Publications by authors named "Mansur Zarrabi"

10 Publications

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Dataset for adsorptive removal of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution via natural light weight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) and LECA coated with manganese oxide nanoparticles in the presence of HO.

Data Brief 2019 Feb 28;22:676-686. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran.

In this data article, natural (NL) and manganese oxide-modified LECA (MML) adsorbents were applied for adsorptive removal of Tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The used adsorbents was characterized using fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The chemical analysis of XRF data revealed increased chemical composition of Mn as MnO to 8.96 wt%. The SEM patterns were illustrated the extent of surface and enhanced porosity in MML with Mn. In optimum operational conditions, maximum removal percentage of TC was achieved at 51.5 and 99.4% using NL and MML, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained from Langmuir modeling were 6.89 and 9.24 for NL and MML, respectively. The modeling of the adsorption kinetics revealed that TC adsorption by both NL and MML adsorbents was best-fitted with a pseudo-first-order model ( = 0.978). The isotherm studies of TC adsorption by MML showed that the Freundlich isotherm was the most appropriate model, with a higher coefficient of determination. The obtained data was illustrated that high competitive capacity of chloride and hardness ions compared with other ions against TC adsorption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2018.12.077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327738PMC
February 2019

Effective reduction of metronidazole over the cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (K-OMS-2) catalyst: facile synthesis, experimental design and modeling, statistical analysis, and identification of by-products.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2018 Dec 4;25(34):34164-34180. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Research Center for Health, Safety and Environment, Faculty of Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.

High concentrations of antibiotic compounds within pharmaceutical wastewater have hazardous impacts toward environment and human health. Therefore, there is an immediate requirement of efficient treatment method for removal of antibiotics from aquatic environment. In the present study, the cryptomelane catalyst-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (K-OMS-2) was synthesized in the presence of benzyl alcohol as a reducing agent and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a structure-directing agent and then utilized to reduce the metronidazole. The central composite design method was the experimental design adopted. The FESEM analysis revealed that the K-OMS-2 surface contained many uniformly cylindrical aggregates less than about 40 nm in diameter and about 80-100 nm in length. Besides, a high specific surface area of 129 m/g and average pore size of 45.47 nm were recorded. According to the TGA/DTA analysis, the prepared catalyst revealed high thermal stability. The maximum metronidazole degradation (95.36%) was evident at conditions of pH = 3, catalyst mass = 0.97 g/L, contact time = 200 min, and metronidazole concentration = 20 mg/L. Metronidazole did not form a complex with nitrate, fluoride, sulfate, or hardness. These ions exerted a negligible effect on metronidazole reduction using the K-OMS-2 catalyst, except for hardness, which reduced the removal efficiency of metronidazole by 17%. The FTIR and LC-MS revealed a complex mechanism involved in the metronidazole degradation by the K-OMS-2 involving the formation of an amino group, a hydroxyelated compound via N-denitration, and hydrogenation process on the K-OMS-2 catalyst surface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-3352-9DOI Listing
December 2018

An overview report on the application of heteropoly acids on supporting materials in the photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants from aqueous solutions.

PeerJ 2018 12;6:e5501. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Social Development & Health Promotion Research Center, Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran.

Organic pollutants contaminate water resources and the environment when discharged into water streams. Also, the presence of these materials in incompletely treated or untreated wastewater leads to serious environmental hazards. The hydroxyl radicals and holes are regarded as the most oxidant species in the degradation of organic pollutants using the studied composites. The results of this review show that heteropoly acids on supporting materials could be considered as appropriate photocatalysts in the removal of organic pollutant from aqueous solutions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.5501DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6139020PMC
September 2018

Using natural clinoptilolite zeolite as an amendment in vermicomposting of food waste.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2018 Aug 2;25(23):23045-23054. Epub 2018 Jun 2.

Torbat Heydariyeh University of Medical Sciences, Torbat Heydariyeh, Iran.

The effect of adding different proportions of natural clinoptilolite zeolite (5 and 10%) to food waste vermicomposting was investigated by assessing the physicochemical characteristics, worms' growth, and maturation time of finished vermicompost in comparison with the vermicompost prepared with no amendment (control). Vermicomposting was performed in 18 plastic containers for 70 days. The experimental results showed that the carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratios were 15.85, 10.75, and 8.94 for 5 and 10% zeolite concentration and control after 70 days, respectively. The addition of zeolite could facilitate organic matter degradation and increase the total nitrogen content by adsorption of ammonium ions. Increasing the proportion of zeolite from 0% (control) to 10% decreased the ammonia escape by 25% in the final vermicompost. The natural zeolite significantly reduced the electrical conductivity (EC). At the end of the process, salinity uptake efficiency was 39.23% for 5% zeolite treatment and 45.23% for 10% zeolite treatment. The pH values at 5 and 10% zeolite-amended treatments were 7.31 and 7.57, respectively, in comparison to 7.10 in the control. The maturation time at the end of vermicomposting decreased with increasing zeolite concentration. The vermicompost containing 5 and 10% zeolite matured in 49 and 42 days, respectively, in comparison to 56 days for the control. With the use of an initial ten immature Eisenia fetida worms, the number of mature worms in the 10% zeolite treatment was 26 more than that in the 5% zeolite treatment (21 worms) and 9 more than that in the control treatment (17 worms). Significantly, natural zeolite showed a beneficial effect on the characteristics of the end-product when used in the vermicomposting of food waste.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-2360-0DOI Listing
August 2018

Health risk assessment of heavy metal intake due to fish consumption in the Sistan region, Iran.

Environ Monit Assess 2017 Oct 25;189(11):583. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran.

The heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni) content of a fish species consumed by the Sistan population and its associated health risk factors were investigated. The mean concentrations of Pb, Cd, and Cr were slightly higher than the standard levels. The Ni content of fish was below the maximum guideline proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). The average estimated weekly intake was significantly below the provisional tolerable intake based on the FAO and WHO standards for all studied metals. The target hazard quotients (THQ) of all metals were below 1, showing an absence of health hazard for the population of Sistan. The combined target hazard quotient for the considered metals was 26.94 × 10. The cancer risk factor for Pb (1.57 × 10) was below the acceptable lifetime carcinogenic risk (10). The results of this study reveal an almost safe level of Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni contents in the fish consumed by the Sistan population. Graphical abstract ᅟ.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-017-6286-7DOI Listing
October 2017

Enhancement of the adsorption capacity of the light-weight expanded clay aggregate surface for the metronidazole antibiotic by coating with MgO nanoparticles: Studies on the kinetic, isotherm, and effects of environmental parameters.

Chemosphere 2017 May 9;175:8-20. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Research Center for Health, Safety and Environment (RCHSE), Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.

The synthesized MgO nanoparticles were used to coat the light-weight expanded clay aggregates (LECA) and as a metronidazole (MNZ) adsorbent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques were employed to study the surface morphology and characteristics of the adsorbents. MgO/LECA clearly revealed the advantages of the nanocomposite particles, showing high specific surface area (76.12 m/g), significant adsorption sites and functional groups. Between pH 5 and 9, the MNZ sorption was not significantly affected. Kinetic studies revealed that the MNZ adsorption closely followed the Avrami model, with no dominant process controlling the sorption rate. The study of the effects of foreign ions revealed that the addition of carbonate raised the MNZ removal efficiency of LECA by 8% and the total removal of MNZ by MgO/LECA. Furthermore, nitrate and hardness only marginally influenced the MNZ removal efficiency and their effects can be ranked in the order of carbonate>nitrate>hardness. The isotherm adsorption of MNZ was best fitted with the Langmuir model enlighten the monolayer MNZ adsorption on the homogeneous LECA and MgO/LECA surfaces. The maximum adsorption capacity under optimum conditions was enhanced from 56.31 to 84.55 mg/g for LECA and MgO/LECA, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the MgO/LECA nanocomposite showed potential as an efficient adsorbent for MNZ removal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.02.043DOI Listing
May 2017

Kinetic modeling of antibiotic adsorption onto different nanomaterials using the Brouers-Sotolongo fractal equation.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2017 Feb 7;24(4):4048-4057. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Research Center for Health, Safety and Environment (RCHSE), Alborz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box No: 31485/561, Alborz, Karaj, Iran.

In this study, the kinetic data of the adsorption of two antibiotics onto three nanoadsorbents was modeled using the Brouers-Sotolongo fractal model. The model parameters were calculated at different initial antibiotic concentrations using various approximations of the kinetic equation for two quantities of practical relevance: the sorption power and the half-time characteristic of the sorption. The merits of the nanomaterial were then compared in terms of their application in the elimination of dangerous antibiotic wastes. We also developed a formula to calculate the effective rate of the best adsorbent. This study presents the modeling method in detail and has a pedagogical value for similar researches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-016-8182-zDOI Listing
February 2017

Post-treatment of secondary wastewater treatment plant effluent using a two-stage fluidized bed bioreactor system.

J Environ Health Sci Eng 2013 Jun 17;11(1):10. Epub 2013 Jun 17.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.

The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of a two-stage fluidized bed reactor (FBR) system for the post-treatment of secondary wastewater treatment plant effluents (Shahrak Gharb, Tehran, Iran). The proposed treatment scheme was evaluated using pilot-scale reactors (106-L of capacity) filled with PVC as the fluidized bed (first stage) and gravel for the filtration purpose (second stage). Aluminum sulfate (30 mg/L) and chlorine (1 mg/L) were used for the coagulation and disinfection of the effluent, respectively. To monitor the performance of the FBR system, variation of several parameters (biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, total phosphorous, total coliform and fecal coliform) were monitored in the effluent wastewater samples. The results showed that the proposed system could effectively reduce BOD5 and COD below 1.95 and 4.06 mg/L, respectively. Turbidity of the effluent could be achieved below 0.75 NTU, which was lower than those reported for the disinfection purpose. The total phosphorus was reduced to 0.52 mg/L, which was near the present phosphorous standard for the prevention of eutrophication process. Depending on both microorganism concentration and applied surface loading rates (5-10 m/h), about 35 to 75% and 67 to 97% of coliform were removed without and with the chlorine addition, respectively. Findings of this study clearly confirmed the efficiency of the FBR system for the post-treatment of the secondary wastewater treatment plant effluents without any solid problem during the chlorination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2052-336X-11-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4176305PMC
June 2013

Urban runoff treatment using nano-sized iron oxide coated sand with and without magnetic field applying.

J Environ Health Sci Eng 2013 Dec 20;11(1):43. Epub 2013 Dec 20.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Hamedan University of Medical Sciences, Hamedan, Iran.

Increase of impervious surfaces in urban area followed with increases in runoff volume and peak flow, leads to increase in urban storm water pollution. The polluted runoff has many adverse impacts on human life and environment. For that reason, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of nano iron oxide coated sand with and without magnetic field in treatment of urban runoff. In present work, synthetic urban runoff was treated in continuous separate columns system which was filled with nano iron oxide coated sand with and without magnetic field. Several experimental parameters such as heavy metals, turbidity, pH, nitrate and phosphate were controlled for investigate of system efficiency. The prepared column materials were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) instruments. SEM and EDXA analyses proved that the sand has been coated with nano iron oxide (Fe3O4) successfully. The results of SEM and EDXA instruments well demonstrate the formation of nano iron oxide (Fe3O4) on sand particle. Removal efficiency without magnetic field for turbidity; Pb, Zn, Cd and PO4 were observed to be 90.8%, 73.3%, 75.8%, 85.6% and 67.5%, respectively. When magnetic field was applied, the removal efficiency for turbidity, Pb, Zn, Cd and PO4 was increased to 95.7%, 89.5%, 79.9%, 91.5% and 75.6% respectively. In addition, it was observed that coated sand and magnetic field was not able to remove NO3 ions. Statistical analyses of data indicated that there was a significant difference between removals of pollutants in two tested columns. Results of this study well demonstrate the efficiency of nanosized iron oxide-coated sand in treatment of urban runoff quality; upon 75% of pollutants could be removed. In addition, in the case of magnetic field system efficiency can be improved significantly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2052-336X-11-43DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3892038PMC
December 2013

Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

Iranian J Environ Health Sci Eng 2012 Nov 5;9(1). Epub 2012 Nov 5.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.

Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1735-2746-9-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561058PMC
November 2012