Publications by authors named "Mansour Soltanzadeh"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of Effects of Melatonin and Gabapentin on Post Operative Anxiety and Pain in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Anesth Pain Med 2018 Jun 24;8(3):e68763. Epub 2018 Jun 24.

Department of Anesthesia, Ahvaz Anesthesiology and Pain Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Background: Surgery is one of the stressors that cause physiological and psychological stress. Anxiety and pain and their complications are very important in anesthesiology and many researches have been done to decrease or eliminate them. This training was done to compare the effect of melatonin and gabapentin on pain and anxiety during lumbar surgery.

Methods: This study was a double-blinded clinical trial conducted on 90 patients undergoing lumbar surgery with general anesthesia in Golestan Academic Hospital in 2017. Patients were randomly assigned into 3 groups: 30 patients received 6 mg melatonin, 30 patients received 600 mg gabapentin, and 30 patients were on placebo (control), 100 minutes preoperatively. All patients were given a fixed method of anesthesia. The pain intensity and patients' satisfaction from analgesia measured at 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery. The anxiety was measured 15 minutes before surgery and 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery.

Results: In our study, there was a significant difference between mean Visual Analog Score between melatonin and gabapentin groups in comparison to placebo (P = 0.02). The intensity of anxiety among the groups was lower in melatonin and gabapentin groups in comparison to placebo (P = 0.01).

Conclusions: The results show that pretreatment with melatonin or gabapentin decreases anxiety and pain in lumbar surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/aapm.68763DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6119980PMC
June 2018

The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate Versus Intravenous Sufentanil on the Duration of Analgesia and Postoperative Pain in Patients with Tibia Fracture.

Anesth Pain Med 2017 Apr 21;7(2):e44035. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

Anesthesiologist, Department of Anesthesiology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Background: In the recent decades controlling postoperative pain has become a popular topic as it leads to the patients' wellbeing and improved life quality, while it reduces the costs for both patients and medical facilities.

Objectives: This study aimed at comparing intravenous magnesium sulfate versus intravenous sufentanil on the duration of analgesia and postoperative pain in patients undergoing tibia fracture surgery.

Methods: This double blind clinical trial study was performed on 70 candidates of tibia fractures between the ages of 18 and 55 years with American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class I and II. The patients were randomly divided to 2 groups, 1 receiving magnesium sulfate (M) and another receiving sufentanil (S). Both of the groups underwent spinal anesthesia with 10 mg bupivacaine 0.5%. One hour after ensuring the sensorimotor blockade, in the S group 0.1 µg/kg/hour and in the M group 8 mg/kg/hour was diluted in 1 liter of Ringer's solution and infused. In this study, full weakness of the lower limb was considered as the sign of sensorimotor blockade initiation. The postoperative pain intensity was measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), 0, 1, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after the end of anesthesia duration. In case of VAS ≥ 3, the patients received 0.3 mg/kg pethidine, intravenously. At last, the time of requesting the first narcotic drug and the total usage of pethidine were recorded.

Results And Conclusions: Sufentanil was found to be more effective than magnesium sulfate in reducing postoperative pain and the time of first narcotics request was later in patients receiving sufentanil (P < 0.05).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/aapm.44035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5594416PMC
April 2017

Analgesic effect of low dose subcutaneous ketamine administration before and after cesarean section.

Iran Red Crescent Med J 2014 Mar 5;16(3):e15506. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Pain Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran ; Department of Anesthesiology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran.

Background: Pain is considered as an importantissue after cesarean section. Multimodal approach to post cesarean pain management may not only enhance analgesia but also reduce side effects after the surgery.

Objectives: This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of subcutaneous injection of low dose ketamine at the incision site to reduce cesarean section pain.

Patients And Methods: Sixty patients, aged between 18 and 25 years old, scheduled for elective cesarean section, were enrolled to this double-blind randomized controlled trial study. Patients were divided into three groups of 20 patients each group one (k-pre) received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine before skin incision and normal saline after skin closure, group two (k-post) received normal saline before skin incision and 0.5 mg/kg ketamine after skin closure and group three (C) received normal saline before skin incision and after skin closure; subcutaneously at the incision site. The first analgesic request, the amount of analgesic and the pain intensity were evaluated for 24 hours.

Results: The first time analgesic requested was longer and the amount of analgesic used during the first 24 hours was significantly lower in groups K-pre and K-post compared with group C (P < 0.05). Pain intensity was significantly lower at 2, 4, 6 and 12 hours in groups K-pre and K-post compared with group C (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, pain intensity was not significantly different at 18 and 24 hours in group C (P > 0.05). The first requested time, total used amount of analgesicand pain intensity were not meaningfully different in K-pre and K-post groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Patients who were given ketamine before or after cesarean section subcutaneously at incision site had lower pain intensity and less analgesic consumption than patients who were given placebo.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/ircmj.15506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4005445PMC
March 2014