Publications by authors named "Manoochehr Shabani Kordshooli"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A reducing trend of fasciolosis in slaughtered animals based on abattoir data in South of Iran.

Vet World 2017 Apr 20;10(4):418-423. Epub 2017 Apr 20.

Jahrom City Veterinary Offices, Jahrom, Iran.

Aim: Fascioliasis is a zoonosis infection caused by the liver trematodes ( spp.) which have been considered to be an important disease in livestock. After several large outbreaks, fascioliasis remains one of the serious health concerns of Iran. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and possible trends of fascioliasis in slaughtered animals in South of Iran based on abattoir data during a period of 5 years.

Materials And Methods: The daily records for cattle, sheep, and goats slaughtered in the abattoir were extracted from the archived documents of the recent 5 years (2011-2015) and used as the source of data. The collected data were statistically analyzed for finding any probable correlation between the various factors associated with fasciolosis.

Results: Our results showed that 3.44% of all slaughtered animals during 2011-2015 were infected with spp. The mean prevalence of fasciolosis for cattle, sheep, and goat was 11.15%, 5.22%, and 2.15%, respectively. In addition, the highest infection rate was in winter (4.02%), and the lowest were entered in summer (2.86%).

Conclusion: Our findings showed a reducing trend during the 5 years. Improving the animal husbandry and increasing the awareness through fasciolosis may be a logical explanation for this trend. Since there have been suggested numerous factors associated with the epidemiology of fasciolosis, further studies seem essential for better clarifying the various aspects of fasciolosis in areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2017.418-423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5422246PMC
April 2017

Type I, predominant genotype isolated from sheep in South of Iran.

Vet World 2017 Apr 7;10(4):386-392. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

Department of Biology, Basic Sciences Faculty, Islamic Azad University, Jahrom Branch, Jahrom, Iran.

Aim: This study was performed to determine the genetic diversity of in sheep using nested-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in Southern Iran.

Materials And Methods: The tissue samples of diaphragm and heart from 125 sheep were collected from the main slaughterhouses of Jahrom district in South of Fars province, Iran, between Aprils and June 2013. The DNA were extracted and analyzed by nested-PCR using specific primers for SAG2 and GRA6 loci. RFLP was used to classify strains into one of the three major lineages of .

Results: Type I was predominant in this area. The data obtained from both loci demonstrated that the frequency of each genotype was 72% Type I, 2.4% Type III, 7.2% mixed Type I and II, 16.8% mixed Type I and III, 0.8% mixed Type II and III, and 0.8% mixed Type I, II and III.

Conclusions: Although the previously published data indicated that Type II is the predominant genotype in sheep in the other parts of the world, this study showed that genotype I is the dominant genotype of in the southern Iran; however, other genotypes were detected. High diversity of genotypes including mix genotypes in lambs is of importance for the public health. These studies depict a new mapping of genotypes pattern which could be very helpful in toxoplasmosis control and prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2017.386-392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5422241PMC
April 2017

Toxoplasma infection in sheep from south of Iran monitored by serological and molecular methods; risk assessment to meat consumers.

Vet World 2016 Aug 13;9(8):850-5. Epub 2016 Aug 13.

Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Shiraz Branch, Shiraz, Iran.

Aim: Toxoplasma gondii has a clinical and veterinary importance as it is known to cause congenital disease and abortion both in humans and livestock. Since the contaminated lamb is one of the sources of human infection, this study was performed to determine the prevalence of T. gondii in sheep in south of Iran.

Materials And Methods: Sera and tissue samples (diaphragm and heart) were collected from 370 sheep from slaughterhouse of Jahrom. The samples were taken from both sexes and from 6 to 60 months age. Specific immunoglobulin G antibodies to T. gondii were examined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and B1 gene nested-polymerase chain reaction detection was done to survey the tissue samples.

Results: The total prevalence of Toxoplasma infection among sheep was found to be 35.94% and 34.32% based on serological and molecular method, respectively. According to serologic and molecular findings, the females were more positive than males for Toxoplasma; maximum frequency of positive samples was observed in 24-36 months and the positive samples had been collected more in spring than in summer, but no statistical correlation was observed between prevalence rate and the age and sex of animals or season of sampling.

Conclusion: T. gondii is widely distributed in sheep in Jahrom with a rate comparable with other parts of Iran and the world. It suggested a widespread exposure of sheep in this region to T. gondii. Thus, consumption of undercooked or raw meat presents the transmission risk of the parasite and this might be considered as an important public health problem, mainly for high-risk groups such as the pregnant and the immunodeficient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2016.850-855DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5021834PMC
August 2016