Publications by authors named "Manoel V F Lemos"

7 Publications

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Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis Strain T01-328, a Brazilian Isolate That Produces a Soluble Pesticide Protein, Cry1Ia.

Genome Announc 2013 Oct 10;1(5). Epub 2013 Oct 10.

Departamento de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho," Campus de Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil.

Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis strain T01-328, isolated from Cubatão county (São Paulo State, Brazil), produces a soluble pesticide protein, Cry1Ia, during vegetative growth. Here, we report the 7.089-Mbp draft genome sequence, composed of a 5.5-Mb chromosome and 14 plasmids, which is the largest B. thuringiensis genome sequenced to date.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00817-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3795215PMC
October 2013

[Toxic activity of Bacillus Thuringiensis isolates to Aedes Aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae].

Neotrop Entomol 2010 Sep-Oct;39(5):757-66

Depto de Biologia Aplicada à Agropecuária, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Unesp, Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil, 14.884-900.

Aedes aegypti (L.), the main vector of dengue fever in Brazil, has been controlled with the use of massive chemical products, contributing to the development of resistance and decreasing the insect control efficiency. The control of dipterans with bioinsecticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis has been satisfactory, due to the production of insecticidal proteins denominated Cry (crystal), Cyt (cytolytic) toxins and Chi (chitinase), and to the synergistic effects among them. The present work aimed to select B. thuringiensis isolates efficient against A. aegypti larvae. A bacterial collection containing 1,073 isolates of B. thuringiensis, obtained from different locations of Brazilian territory, had the DNA isolated and submitted to PCR amplifications using specific primers for cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cry11Ba, cyt1Aa, cyt1Ab, cyt2Aa and chi genes. For the LC50 and LC90 determination, the entomopathogenic isolates were evaluated by selective and quantitative bioassays. Only 45 isolates (4.2%) presented amplicons for the cry and cyt genes. The chi gene sequence was detected in 25 (54.3%) of those isolates. From the 45 isolates submitted to the selective bioassays, 13 caused 100% mortality of A. aegypti larvae. The identification of cry, cyt and chi genes of B. thuringiensis and the toxicity analysis on A. aegypti led to the selection of a set of isolates that have the potential to be used in the formulation of new bioinsecticides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s1519-566x2010000500015DOI Listing
March 2011

cry1 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis: specificity determination and implications for primer design.

Biotechnol Lett 2009 Dec 28;31(12):1891-7. Epub 2009 Jul 28.

Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinária, Laboratório de Genética de Bactérias e Biotecnologia Aplicada, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Jaboticabal, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Some pest management programs employ PCR to identify cry1 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis to predict bacterial toxicity towards different insect pests. However, due to changes on the mode of action of the Cry proteins, new primers had to be designed to detect the new genes. Therefore, an 'in-silico' study of genetic sequences from five cry1 subclasses was carried out and characterized by molecular tools. The design of new primers allows for more precise selection of B. thuringiensis isolates, helping to better direct the programs employing biological control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-009-0088-0DOI Listing
December 2009

[Association of bioassays and molecular characterization to select new Bacillus thuringiensis isolates effective against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)].

Neotrop Entomol 2007 Sep-Oct;36(5):737-45

Depto. Biologia Aplicada à Agropecuária, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP.

The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is one of the main corn pests and Bacillus thuringiensis is important in its control because of its entomopathogenic property. The objective of this study was the molecular characterization of B. thuringiensis isolates for cry1 locus presence and the assessment of the efficiency of these isolates in controlling S. frugiperda caterpillars. Gral-cry1 was used in the PCR analyses to confirm the presence of the cry1 locus in 15 isolates. A 3 x 10(8) spore/ml suspension bathed the diet used to feed 30 caterpillars per isolate, with three replications. The cry1 locus type genes of the different isolates were identified for five gene subclasses; linear regression analyses were carried out to ascertain possible associations between the presence of an individual cry1 locus gene and high levels of toxicity. All the DNAs amplified with Gral-cry1 presented an amplification product with the expected size. Regarding the levels of insecticide efficiency against the cob worm, 41 isolates presented 100% mortality and 16 presented an index between 70% and 90%. The cry1Ab gene was present in 80 isolates, cryb in 69 isolates, cry1Ac in all the isolates and cryv and cry1E in 93 and 27 isolates, respectively. The values regarding the individual effect of each gene on caterpillar mortality were significant at 1% probability for the cry1Ac and cry1E genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s1519-566x2007000500015DOI Listing
February 2008

The genome sequence of the gram-positive sugarcane pathogen Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli.

Mol Plant Microbe Interact 2004 Aug;17(8):827-36

Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Pádua Dias, 11, 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.

The genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, which causes ratoon stunting disease and affects sugarcane worldwide, was determined. The single circular chromosome of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli CTCB07 was 2.6 Mb in length with a GC content of 68% and 2,044 predicted open reading frames. The analysis also revealed 307 predicted pseudogenes, which is more than any bacterial plant pathogen sequenced to date. Many of these pseudogenes, if functional, would likely be involved in the degradation of plant heteropolysaccharides, uptake of free sugars, and synthesis of amino acids. Although L. xyli subsp. xyli has only been identified colonizing the xylem vessels of sugarcane, the numbers of predicted regulatory genes and sugar transporters are similar to those in free-living organisms. Some of the predicted pathogenicity genes appear to have been acquired by lateral transfer and include genes for cellulase, pectinase, wilt-inducing protein, lysozyme, and desaturase. The presence of the latter may contribute to stunting, since it is likely involved in the synthesis of abscisic acid, a hormone that arrests growth. Our findings are consistent with the nutritionally fastidious behavior exhibited by L. xyli subsp. xyli and suggest an ongoing adaptation to the restricted ecological niche it inhabits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/MPMI.2004.17.8.827DOI Listing
August 2004

Evaluation of monocot and eudicot divergence using the sugarcane transcriptome.

Plant Physiol 2004 Mar;134(3):951-9

Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6010, 13083-970, Campinas SP, Brazil.

Over 40,000 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) consensus sequences assembled from 237,954 expressed sequence tags were compared with the protein and DNA sequences from other angiosperms, including the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa). Approximately two-thirds of the sugarcane transcriptome have similar sequences in Arabidopsis. These sequences may represent a core set of proteins or protein domains that are conserved among monocots and eudicots and probably encode for essential angiosperm functions. The remaining sequences represent putative monocot-specific genetic material, one-half of which were found only in sugarcane. These monocot-specific cDNAs represent either novelties or, in many cases, fast-evolving sequences that diverged substantially from their eudicot homologs. The wide comparative genome analysis presented here provides information on the evolutionary changes that underlie the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Our comparative analysis also led to the identification of several not yet annotated putative genes and possible gene loss events in Arabidopsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.103.033878DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC389918PMC
March 2004

Analysis and functional annotation of an expressed sequence tag collection for tropical crop sugarcane.

Genome Res 2003 Dec 12;13(12):2725-35. Epub 2003 Nov 12.

Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Instituto da Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas-SP, Brazil.

To contribute to our understanding of the genome complexity of sugarcane, we undertook a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) program. More than 260,000 cDNA clones were partially sequenced from 26 standard cDNA libraries generated from different sugarcane tissues. After the processing of the sequences, 237,954 high-quality ESTs were identified. These ESTs were assembled into 43,141 putative transcripts. Of the assembled sequences, 35.6% presented no matches with existing sequences in public databases. A global analysis of the whole SUCEST data set indicated that 14,409 assembled sequences (33% of the total) contained at least one cDNA clone with a full-length insert. Annotation of the 43,141 assembled sequences associated almost 50% of the putative identified sugarcane genes with protein metabolism, cellular communication/signal transduction, bioenergetics, and stress responses. Inspection of the translated assembled sequences for conserved protein domains revealed 40,821 amino acid sequences with 1415 Pfam domains. Reassembling the consensus sequences of the 43,141 transcripts revealed a 22% redundancy in the first assembling. This indicated that possibly 33,620 unique genes had been identified and indicated that >90% of the sugarcane expressed genes were tagged.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.1532103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC403815PMC
December 2003