Publications by authors named "Manoel Souza"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Real-world evidence on first-line treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma with non-clear cell and sarcomatoid histologies: are sunitinib and pazopanib interchangeable?

Ecancermedicalscience 2019 4;13:973. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Instituto do Cancer do Estado de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Av Dr Arnaldo 251, São Paulo 01246-000, Brazil.

Introduction: Non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma (nccRCC) and sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (sRCC) are underrepresented in clinical trials. Treatment approaches are frequently extrapolated from data of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, in which pazopanib is non-inferior to sunitinib. We aim to compare the effectiveness of first-line sunitinib and pazopanib for nccRCC and sRCC.

Methods: We evaluated a retrospective cohort of patients with metastatic nccRCC and sRCC treated with first-line sunitinib or pazopanib at an academic cancer centre. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and response rate were measured. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were used for time-to-event data. Cox regression was used for prognostic factors.

Results: Fifty-three patients were included; 16 (30.1%) treated with sunitinib and 37 (69.9%) with pazopanib. Forty-six (86.8%) patients had nccRCC and 7 (13.2%) had sRCC. The majority had intermediate or poor International Metastatic Renal-Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium risk (93%).Median PFS was 6.6 months with sunitinib and 4.9 months with pazopanib (HR 1.75; = 0.078). Treatment with pazopanib was associated with inferior OS in comparison with sunitinib (median OS: 30.4 months versus 8.7 months; HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.31-5.58, = 0.007). These results were confirmed in subgroup analysis of patients with papillary, chromophobe and MiT family translocation histologies (median OS: 38.7 months versus 14.7 months; HR 3.16, 95% CI 1.20-8.29, = 0.019). Unclassified and sarcomatoid histologies had inferior OS (median: 6.9 and 1.1 months, respectively) regardless of the treatment used.

Conclusion: In this patient cohort, pazopanib was associated with inferior OS in comparison with sunitinib for metastatic nccRCC. Larger trials are ideally warranted to confirm these results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2019.973DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6946421PMC
November 2019

Metabolic fingerprinting analysis of oil palm reveals a set of differentially expressed metabolites in fatal yellowing symptomatic and non-symptomatic plants.

Metabolomics 2018 10 11;14(10):142. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Embrapa Agroenergy, W3 Norte, PqEB, Brasília, DF, 70770-901, Brazil.

Introduction: Oil palm (E. guineensis), the most consumed vegetable oil in the world, is affected by fatal yellowing (FY), a condition that can lead to the plant's death. Although studies have been performed since the 1980s, including investigations of biotic and abiotic factors, FY's cause remains unknown and efforts in researches are still necessary.

Objectives: This work aims to investigate the metabolic expression in plants affected by FY using an untargeted metabolomics approach.

Method: Metabolic fingerprinting analysis of oil palm leaves was performed using ultra high liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS). Chemometric analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), was applied to data analysis. Metabolites identification was performed by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), MS/MS experiments and comparison with databases and literature.

Results: Metabolomics analysis based on MS detected more than 50 metabolites in oil palm leaf samples. PCA and PLS-DS analysis provided group segregation and classification of symptomatic and non-symptomatic FY samples, with a great external validation of the results. Nine differentially expressed metabolites were identified as glycerophosphorylcholine, arginine, asparagine, apigenin 6,8-di-C-hexose, tyramine, chlorophyllide, 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, proline and malvidin 3-glucoside-5-(6″-malonylglucoside). Metabolic pathways and biological importance of those metabolites were assigned.

Conclusion: Nine metabolites were detected in a higher concentration in non-symptomatic FY plants. Seven are related to stress factors i.e. plant defense and nutrient absorption, which can be affected by the metabolic depression of these compounds. Two of those metabolites (glycerophosphorylcholine and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) are presented as potential biomarkers, since they have no known direct relation to plant stress.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11306-018-1436-7DOI Listing
October 2018

Analysis of Efficacy and Toxicity Profile of First-Line Sunitinib or Pazopanib in Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Brazilian Population.

J Glob Oncol 2018 08;4:1-10

Pedro Isaacsson Velho, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, and Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre; and Mirella Nardo, Manoel Carlos Leonardi de Azevedo Souza, Renata R.C. Colombo Bonadio, Guilherme Nader Marta, David Q.B. Muniz, Diogo Assed Bastos, and Carlos Dzik, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Purpose Sunitinib and pazopanib are multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that act against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and are standard first-line treatment options for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The Brazilian public health system diverges from the randomized clinical trials in the availability of first and subsequent lines of treatment and in clinical and demographic characteristics of patients. Therefore, it is essential to describe the history of advanced ccRCC during and after TKI treatment in this population. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with advanced ccRCC treated with a first-line TKI (either sunitinib or pazopanib) between February 2009 and March 2017 in a single academic Brazilian cancer center (Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo). Results Of the 222 patients, 109 were treated with sunitinib and 113 with pazopanib. The median duration of treatment and overall survival (OS) were 6.4 and 15.2 months for sunitinib and 6.7 and 14.2 months for pazopanib, respectively. Discontinuation of treatment occurred secondarily to progressive disease or death in 64.2% of patients using sunitinib and in 54.8% of patients using pazopanib. Adverse events were responsible for discontinuation of treatment in 28.4% of patients in the sunitinib group and in 22.1% in the pazopanib group. According to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk categories, the OS was 32.9 months, 15.9 months, and 8.1 months for low risk, intermediate risk, and poor risk, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.26; P < .001). Conclusion The use of TKI inhibitors as first-line treatment of metastatic RCC is effective and feasible in the Brazilian public health. However, the median OS of our population is considerably lower compared with the prospective trials that evaluated the same drugs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JGO.18.00073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7010438PMC
August 2018

Targeted and random genetic modification of the black Sigatoka pathogen Pseudocercospora fijiensis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation.

J Microbiol Methods 2018 05 12;148:127-137. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen Plant Research, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; Wageningen University and Research, Laboratory of Phytopathology, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2018.03.017DOI Listing
May 2018

A procedure for maize genotypes discrimination to drought by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging rapid light curves.

Plant Methods 2017 26;13:61. Epub 2017 Jul 26.

Embrapa Agroenergia, Parque Estação Biológica (PqEB), Avenida W3 Norte (Final), Brasília, DF 70770-901 Brazil.

Background: Photosynthesis can be roughly separated into biochemical and photochemical processes. Both are affected by drought and can be assessed by non-invasive standard methods. Gas exchange, which mainly assesses the first process, has well-defined protocols. It is considered a standard method for evaluation of plant responses to drought. Under such stress, assessment of photochemical apparatus by chlorophyll fluorescence needs improvement to become faster and reproducible, especially in growing plants under field conditions. For this, we developed a protocol based on chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, using a rapid light curve approach.

Results: Almost all parameters obtained by rapid light curves have shown statistical differences between control and drought stressed maize plants. However, most of them were affected by induction processes, relaxation rate, and/or differences in chlorophyll content; while they all were influenced by actinic light intensity on each light step of light curve. Only the normalized parameters related to photochemical and non-photochemical quenching were strongly correlated with data obtained by gas exchange, but only from the light step in which the linear electron flow reached saturation.

Conclusions: The procedure developed in this study for discrimination of plant responses to water deficit stress proved to be as fast, efficient and reliable as the standard technique of gas exchange in order to discriminate the responses of maize genotypes to drought. However, unlike that, there is no need to perform daily and time consuming calibration routines. Moreover, plant acclimation to the dark is not required. The protocol can be applied to plants growing in both controlled conditions and full sunlight in the field. In addition, it generates parameters in a fast and accurate measurement process, which enables evaluating several plants in a short period of time.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13007-017-0209-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5530575PMC
July 2017

HPA axis dysregulation, NR3C1 polymorphisms and glucocorticoid receptor isoforms imbalance in metabolic syndrome.

Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2017 03 24;33(3). Epub 2016 Oct 24.

Department of Internal Medicine - Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Context: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) shares several similarities with hypercortisolism.

Objectives: To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis sensitivity to dexamethasone (DEX), NR3C1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoforms and cytokines in peripheral immune cells of MetS patients and controls.

Design: Prospective study with 40 MetS patients and 40 controls was conducted at the Ribeirão Preto Medical School University Hospital.

Methods: Plasma and salivary cortisol were measured in basal conditions and after 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg of DEX given at 2300 h. In addition, p.N363S (rs6195), p.ER22/23EK (rs6189-6190), and BclI (rs41423247) SNPs were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction allelic discrimination. Exons 3 to 9 and exon/intron boundaries of NR3C1 were sequenced. GR isoforms and cytokines (IL1B, IL2, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, IFNγ, TNFα) expression were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

Results: Plasma and salivary cortisol (nmol/L) after 1-mg DEX were higher in MetS patients compared with controls (PF: 70.2 ± 17.3 vs 37.9 ± 2.6, P = .02, and SF: 4.9 ± 1.7 vs 2.2 ± 0.3, P < .0001). After all DEX doses, a lower number of MetS patients suppressed plasma and salivary cortisol compared with controls. The BclI genotypic frequencies (%) differed between patients (CC:56/CG:44) and controls (CC:50/CG:32.5/GG:17.5) (P = .03). The GRβ was overexpressed (fold = 100.0; P = .002) and IL4 (fold = -265.0; P < .0001) was underexpressed in MetS.

Conclusion: MetS patients exhibited decreased HPA sensitivity to glucocorticoid feedback. Moreover, the BclI polymorphism lower frequency, GRβ overexpression, and IL4 underexpression might underlie the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in MetS. Thus, HPA axis dysregulation might contribute to MetS pathogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.2842DOI Listing
March 2017

Combating a Global Threat to a Clonal Crop: Banana Black Sigatoka Pathogen Pseudocercospora fijiensis (Synonym Mycosphaerella fijiensis) Genomes Reveal Clues for Disease Control.

PLoS Genet 2016 08 11;12(8):e1005876. Epub 2016 Aug 11.

Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Black Sigatoka or black leaf streak disease, caused by the Dothideomycete fungus Pseudocercospora fijiensis (previously: Mycosphaerella fijiensis), is the most significant foliar disease of banana worldwide. Due to the lack of effective host resistance, management of this disease requires frequent fungicide applications, which greatly increase the economic and environmental costs to produce banana. Weekly applications in most banana plantations lead to rapid evolution of fungicide-resistant strains within populations causing disease-control failures throughout the world. Given its extremely high economic importance, two strains of P. fijiensis were sequenced and assembled with the aid of a new genetic linkage map. The 74-Mb genome of P. fijiensis is massively expanded by LTR retrotransposons, making it the largest genome within the Dothideomycetes. Melting-curve assays suggest that the genomes of two closely related members of the Sigatoka disease complex, P. eumusae and P. musae, also are expanded. Electrophoretic karyotyping and analyses of molecular markers in P. fijiensis field populations showed chromosome-length polymorphisms and high genetic diversity. Genetic differentiation was also detected using neutral markers, suggesting strong selection with limited gene flow at the studied geographic scale. Frequencies of fungicide resistance in fungicide-treated plantations were much higher than those in untreated wild-type P. fijiensis populations. A homologue of the Cladosporium fulvum Avr4 effector, PfAvr4, was identified in the P. fijiensis genome. Infiltration of the purified PfAVR4 protein into leaves of the resistant banana variety Calcutta 4 resulted in a hypersensitive-like response. This result suggests that Calcutta 4 could carry an unknown resistance gene recognizing PfAVR4. Besides adding to our understanding of the overall Dothideomycete genome structures, the P. fijiensis genome will aid in developing fungicide treatment schedules to combat this pathogen and in improving the efficiency of banana breeding programs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1005876DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981457PMC
August 2016

NR3C1 polymorphisms in Brazilians of Caucasian, African, and Asian ancestry: glucocorticoid sensitivity and genotype association.

Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol 2014 Feb;58(1):53-61

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.

Objective: The Brazilian population has heterogeneous ethnicity. No previous study evaluated NR3C1 polymorphisms in a Brazilian healthy population.

Materials And Methods: We assessed NR3C1 polymorphisms in Brazilians of Caucasian, African and Asian ancestry (n = 380). In a subgroup (n = 40), we compared the genotypes to glucocorticoid (GC) sensitivity, which was previously evaluated by plasma (PF) and salivary (SF) cortisol after dexamethasone (DEX) suppression tests, GC receptor binding affinity (K d ), and DEX-50% inhibition (IC 50 ) of concanavalin-A-stimulated mononuclear cell proliferation. p.N363S (rs6195), p.ER22/23EK (rs6189-6190), and BclI (rs41423247) allelic discrimination was performed by Real-Time PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). Exons 3 to 9 and exon/intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced.

Results: Genotypic frequencies (%) were: rs6195 (n = 380; AA:96.6/AG:3.14/GG:0.26), rs6189-6190 (n = 264; GG:99.6/GA:0.4), rs41423247 (n = 264; CC:57.9/CG:34.1/GG:8.0), rs6188 (n = 155; GG:69.6/GT:25.7/TT:4.7), rs258751 (n = 150; CC:88.0/CT:10.7/TT:1.3), rs6196 (n = 176; TT:77.2/TC:20.4/CC:2.4), rs67300719 (n = 137; CC:99.3/CT:0.7), and rs72542757 (n = 137; CC:99.3/CG:0.7). The rs67300719 and rs72542757 were found only in Asian descendants, in whom p.N363S and p.ER22/23EK were absent. The p.ER22/23EK was observed exclusively in Caucasian descendants. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed, except in the Asian for rs6188 and rs258751, and in the African for p.N363S. The K d , IC 50 , baseline and after DEX PF or SF did not differ between genotype groups. However, the mean DEX dose that suppressed PF or SF differed among the BclI genotypes (P = 0.03). DEX dose was higher in GG- (0.7 ± 0.2 mg) compared to GC- (0.47 ± 0.2 mg) and CC-carriers (0.47 ± 0.1 mg).

Conclusion: The genotypic frequencies of NR3C1 polymorphisms in Brazilians are similar to worldwide populations. Additionally, the BclI polymorphism was associated with altered pituitary-adrenal axis GC sensitivity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0004-2730000002868DOI Listing
February 2014

Reassessment of the Genome Size in Elaeis guineensis and Elaeis oleifera, and Its Interspecific Hybrid.

Genomics Insights 2014 3;7:13-22. Epub 2014 Sep 3.

Laboratory of Genetics and Biotechnology, Embrapa Agroenergy, Brasília, DF, Brazil. ; Graduate Program in Plant Biotechnology, Federal University of Lavras, Lavras, MG, Brazil.

Aiming at generating a comprehensive genomic database on Elaeis spp., our group is leading several R&D initiatives with Elaeis guineensis (African oil palm) and Elaeis oleifera (American oil palm), including the whole-genome sequencing of the last. Genome size estimates currently available for this genus are controversial, as they indicate that American oil palm genome is about half the size of the African oil palm genome and that the genome of the interspecific hybrid is bigger than both the parental species genomes. We estimated the genome size of three E. guineensis genotypes, five E. oleifera genotypes, and two interspecific hybrids genotypes. On average, the genome size of E. guineensis is 4.32 ± 0.173 pg, while that of E. oleifera is 4.43 ± 0.018 pg. This indicates that both genomes are similar in size, even though E. oleifera is in fact bigger. As expected, the hybrid genome size is around the average of the two genomes, 4.40 ± 0.016 pg. Additionally, we demonstrate that both species present around 38% of GC content. As our results contradict the currently available data on Elaeis spp. genome sizes, we propose that the actual genome size of the Elaeis species is around 4 pg and that American oil palm possesses a larger genome than African oil palm.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4137/GEI.S15522DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4504075PMC
July 2015

Development of expressed sequence tag and expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat marker resources for Musa acuminata.

AoB Plants 2012 26;2012:pls030. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

Universidade de Brasília , Campus Universitário Darcy Ribeiro , Instituto de Ciências Biológicas , Asa Norte, CEP 70910-900, Brasília, DF , Brazil.

Background And Aims: Banana (Musa acuminata) is a crop contributing to global food security. Many varieties lack resistance to biotic stresses, due to sterility and narrow genetic background. The objective of this study was to develop an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of transcripts expressed during compatible and incompatible banana-Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Mf) interactions. Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), caused by Mf, is a destructive disease of banana. Microsatellite markers were developed as a resource for crop improvement.

Methodology: cDNA libraries were constructed from in vitro-infected leaves from BLSD-resistant M. acuminata ssp. burmaniccoides Calcutta 4 (MAC4) and susceptible M. acuminata cv. Cavendish Grande Naine (MACV). Clones were 5'-end Sanger sequenced, ESTs assembled with TGICL and unigenes annotated using BLAST, Blast2GO and InterProScan. Mreps was used to screen for simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with markers evaluated for polymorphism using 20 diploid (AA) M. acuminata accessions contrasting in resistance to Mycosphaerella leaf spot diseases.

Principal Results: A total of 9333 high-quality ESTs were obtained for MAC4 and 3964 for MACV, which assembled into 3995 unigenes. Of these, 2592 displayed homology to genes encoding proteins with known or putative function, and 266 to genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Gene ontology (GO) classification identified 543 GO terms, 2300 unigenes were assigned to EuKaryotic orthologous group categories and 312 mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. A total of 624 SSR loci were identified, with trinucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant in MAC4 (54.1 %) and MACV (57.6 %). Polymorphism across M. acuminata accessions was observed with 75 markers. Alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 8, totalling 289. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.81.

Conclusions: This EST collection offers a resource for studying functional genes, including transcripts expressed in banana-Mf interactions. Markers are applicable for genetic mapping, diversity characterization and marker-assisted breeding.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/pls030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3521319PMC
December 2012

Sugar-mediated acclimation: the importance of sucrose metabolism in meristems.

J Proteome Res 2010 Oct;9(10):5038-46

Division of Crop Biotechnics, K.U. Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

We have designed an in vitro experimental setup to study the role of sucrose in sugar-mediated acclimation of banana meristems using established highly proliferating meristem cultures. It is a first step toward the systems biology of a meristem and the understanding of how it can survive severe abiotic stress. Using the 2D-DIGE proteomic approach and a meristem-specific EST library, we describe the long-term acclimation response of banana meristems (after 2, 4, 8, and 14 days) and analyze the role of sucrose in this acclimation by setting up a control, a sorbitol, and a sucrose acclimation treatment over time. Sucrose synthase is the dominant enzyme for sucrose breakdown in meristem tissue, which is most likely related to its lower energy consumption. Metabolizing sucrose is of paramount importance to survive, but the uptake of sugar and its metabolism also drive respiration, which may result in limited oxygen levels. According to our data, a successful acclimation is correlated to an initial efficient uptake of sucrose and subsequently a reduced breakdown of sucrose and an induction of fermentation likely by a lack of oxygen.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr100321vDOI Listing
October 2010

Characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Musa acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4.

BMC Res Notes 2010 May 27;3:148. Epub 2010 May 27.

Universidade de Brasília, Campus Universitário Darcy Ribeiro, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Asa Norte, Brasília, Brazil.

Background: Banana is a nutritionally important crop across tropical and sub-tropical countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and Asia. Although cultivars have evolved from diploid, triploid and tetraploid wild Asian species of Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome), many of today's commercial cultivars are sterile triploids or diploids, with fruit developing via parthenocarpy. As a result of restricted genetic variation, improvement has been limited, resulting in a crop frequently lacking resistance to pests and disease. Considering the importance of molecular tools to facilitate development of disease resistant genotypes, the objectives of this study were to develop polymorphic microsatellite markers from BAC clone sequences for M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4. This wild diploid species is used as a donor cultivar in breeding programs as a source of resistance to diverse biotic stresses.

Findings: Microsatellite sequences were identified from five Calcutta 4 BAC consensi datasets. Specific primers were designed for 41 loci. Isolated di-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, followed by tri-nucleotides. From 33 tested loci, 20 displayed polymorphism when screened across 21 diploid M. acuminata accessions, contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from two to four, with a total of 56. Six repeat classes were identified, with di-nucleotides the most abundant. Expected heterozygosity values for polymorphic markers ranged from 0.31 to 0.75.

Conclusions: This is the first report identifying polymorphic microsatellite markers from M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4 across accessions contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. These BAC-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for banana, applicable for genetic map development, germplasm characterization, evolutionary studies and marker assisted selection for traits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-3-148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2893197PMC
May 2010

The influence of treatment access regulation and technological resources on the mortality profile of acute biliary pancreatitis.

Acta Cir Bras 2008 ;23 Suppl 1:143-50; discussion 150

Division of Digestive Surgery, Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirão Preto Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Purpose: The influence of treatment access regulation and technological resources on the mortality profile of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) was evaluated.

Methods: The cases seen in a tertiary hospital were studied during two periods of time: 1995-1999 and 2000-2004, i.e., before and after the implementation of medical regulation.

Results: Among the 727 patients with acute pancreatitis, 267 had ABP and were classified according to APACHE II scores. The cases being referred to the tertiary hospital decreased from 441 to 286 (p < 0.001). The patients' profile regarding age, gender, severity, cholestasis incidence and mortality were similar during the first and second periods of study (n = 154 and n = 113, respectively). The number of patients with hematocrit > or =44% was smaller during the second study period (p<0.002). The use of magnetic resonance cholangiography, videolaparoscopic cholecystectomy, and access to the ICU were found to be more frequent during the second study period. Regarding the deaths occurring within 14 days of hospitalisation, 73.4% and 81.3% were observed during the first and second study periods, respectively.

Conclusion: Since the improvement in clinical and technological approach was not enough to modify the mortality profile of ABP, further studies on the treatment of inflammatory responses should be carried out.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-86502008000700023DOI Listing
June 2009

Analysis of non-TIR NBS-LRR resistance gene analogs in Musa acuminata Colla: isolation, RFLP marker development, and physical mapping.

BMC Plant Biol 2008 Jan 30;8:15. Epub 2008 Jan 30.

Postgraduate program in Genomic Science and Biotechnology, Universidade Católica de Brasília, SGAN 916, Módulo B, CEP 70,790-160, Brasília, DF, Brazil.

Background: Many commercial banana varieties lack sources of resistance to pests and diseases, as a consequence of sterility and narrow genetic background. Fertile wild relatives, by contrast, possess greater variability and represent potential sources of disease resistance genes (R-genes). The largest known family of plant R-genes encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Conserved motifs in such genes in diverse plant species offer a means for isolation of candidate genes in banana which may be involved in plant defence.

Results: A computational strategy was developed for unbiased conserved motif discovery in NBS and LRR domains in R-genes and homologues in monocotyledonous plant species. Degenerate PCR primers targeting conserved motifs were tested on the wild cultivar Musa acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4, which is resistant to a number of fungal pathogens and nematodes. One hundred and seventy four resistance gene analogs (RGAs) were amplified and assembled into 52 contiguous sequences. Motifs present were typical of the non-TIR NBS-LRR RGA subfamily. A phylogenetic analysis of deduced amino-acid sequences for 33 RGAs with contiguous open reading frames (ORFs), together with RGAs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, grouped most Musa RGAs within monocotyledon-specific clades. RFLP-RGA markers were developed, with 12 displaying distinct polymorphisms in parentals and F1 progeny of a diploid M. acuminata mapping population. Eighty eight BAC clones were identified in M. acuminata Calcutta 4, M. acuminata Grande Naine, and M. balbisiana Pisang Klutuk Wulung BAC libraries when hybridized to two RGA probes. Multiple copy RGAs were common within BAC clones, potentially representing variation reservoirs for evolution of new R-gene specificities.

Conclusion: This is the first large scale analysis of NBS-LRR RGAs in M. acuminata Calcutta 4. Contig sequences were deposited in GenBank and assigned numbers ER935972 - ER936023. RGA sequences and isolated BACs are a valuable resource for R-gene discovery, and in future applications will provide insight into the organization and evolution of NBS-LRR R-genes in the Musa A and B genome. The developed RFLP-RGA markers are applicable for genetic map development and marker assisted selection for defined traits such as pest and disease resistance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-8-15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2262081PMC
January 2008

Insights into the Musa genome: syntenic relationships to rice and between Musa species.

BMC Genomics 2008 Jan 30;9:58. Epub 2008 Jan 30.

French Agricultural Research Center for International Development, UMR 1096, Avenue Agropolis, TA40/03, FR-34398, Montpellier, Cedex 5, France.

Background: Musa species (Zingiberaceae, Zingiberales) including bananas and plantains are collectively the fourth most important crop in developing countries. Knowledge concerning Musa genome structure and the origin of distinct cultivars has greatly increased over the last few years. Until now, however, no large-scale analyses of Musa genomic sequence have been conducted. This study compares genomic sequence in two Musa species with orthologous regions in the rice genome.

Results: We produced 1.4 Mb of Musa sequence from 13 BAC clones, annotated and analyzed them along with 4 previously sequenced BACs. The 443 predicted genes revealed that Zingiberales genes share GC content and distribution characteristics with eudicot and Poaceae genomes. Comparison with rice revealed microsynteny regions that have persisted since the divergence of the Commelinid orders Poales and Zingiberales at least 117 Mya. The previously hypothesized large-scale duplication event in the common ancestor of major cereal lineages within the Poaceae was verified. The divergence time distributions for Musa-Zingiber (Zingiberaceae, Zingiberales) orthologs and paralogs provide strong evidence for a large-scale duplication event in the Musa lineage after its divergence from the Zingiberaceae approximately 61 Mya. Comparisons of genomic regions from M. acuminata and M. balbisiana revealed highly conserved genome structure, and indicated that these genomes diverged circa 4.6 Mya.

Conclusion: These results point to the utility of comparative analyses between distantly-related monocot species such as rice and Musa for improving our understanding of monocot genome evolution. Sequencing the genome of M. acuminata would provide a strong foundation for comparative genomics in the monocots. In addition a genome sequence would aid genomic and genetic analyses of cultivated Musa polyploid genotypes in research aimed at localizing and cloning genes controlling important agronomic traits for breeding purposes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-9-58DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2270835PMC
January 2008

Structural analysis of catalase from two Musa accessions, FHIA18 and Williams, and from Ravenala madagascariensis.

In Silico Biol 2008 ;8(5-6):413-25

Faculty of Agriculture, University of Mauritius, Mauritius.

Nucleotide sequences of catalase were obtained following amplification using specific primers and were blasted against Musa acuminata catalase 2 mRNA from NCBI (157418810). Clustering of the amino acid sequences from NCBI was done using Clustal X. The latter revealed that FHIA18 catalase is more related to Ravenala madagascariensis (Musa relative) catalase while the Williams catalase is more related to a clade containing a Musa acuminata (Musa ancestor) catalase from NCBI. The tertiary structures and the catalase consensus functional sites, based on the Pseudomonas syringae catalase structural template, were obtained for FHIA18, Williams, Ravenala madagascariensis and Musa acuminata catalases. They were found to differ slightly. Using known features of catalase active sites, four pre-requisite criteria were defined to find such sites: (1) Position of tyrosine axial to heme determined by X-ray diffraction, (2) 7 conserved amino acids in the active site found by sequence alignment, (3) favourable docking energy, and (4) presence of an unobstructed long tunnel that leads the ligand to the active site. Two differing potential docking sites were found for both FHIA18 and Williams that fit a maximum number of criteria. In terms of 1D sequence, the region of the docking site for Williams is within the catalase domains as seen upon NCBI blast. The counterpart of FHIA18 for the same region is not. This sequence difference between FHIA18 and Williams affects the best docking site in FHIA18 and Williams in silico.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2009

Introduction of the anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 gene in passion fruit induces herbicide tolerance, reduced bacterial lesions, but does not inhibits passion fruit woodiness disease progress induced by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV).

Biotechnol Lett 2007 Jan 3;29(1):79-87. Epub 2006 Oct 3.

Departamento de Biologia Celular, Univesidade de Brasília, Brasília, Brasil.

The introduction of anti-apoptotic genes into plants leads to resistance to environmental stress and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The anti-apoptotic gene (p35) from a baculovirus was introduced into the genome of passion fruit plants by biobalistics. Eleven regenerated plants showed the presence of the p35 gene by PCR and/or dot blot hybridization. Transcriptional analysis of regenerated plants showed the presence of specific p35 transcripts in 9 of them. Regenerated plants containing the p35 gene were inoculated with the cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae, and the herbicide, glufosinate, (Syngenta). None of the plants showed resistance to CABMV. Regenerated plants (p35+) showed less than half of local lesions showed by non-transgenic plants when inoculated with X. axonopodis and some p35+ plants showed increased tolerance to the glufosinate herbicide when compared to non-transgenic plants.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-006-9201-9DOI Listing
January 2007

Haematozoan parasites of the lizard Ameiva ameiva (Teiidae) from Amazonian Brazil: a preliminary note.

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2003 Dec;98(8):1067-70

Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto Evandro Chagas, Av. Almirante Barroso 492, 66090-000 Belém, PA, Brasil.

Three different haematozoan parasites are described in the blood of the teiid lizard Ameiva ameiva Linn. from North Brazil: one in the monocytes and the other two in erythrocytes. The leucocytic parasite is probably a species of Lainsonia Landau, 1973 (Lankesterellidae) as suggested by the presence of sporogonic stages in the internal organs, morphology of the blood forms (sporozoites), and their survival and accumulation in macrophages of the liver. One of the erythrocytic parasites produces encapsulated, stain-resistant forms in the peripheral blood, very similar to gametocytes of Hemolivia Petit et al., 1990. The other is morphologically very different and characteristically adheres to the host-cell nucleus. None of the parasites underwent development in the mosquitoes Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti and their behaviour in other haematophagous hosts is under investigation. Mixed infections of the parasites commonly occur and this often creates difficulties in relating the tissue stages in the internal organs to the forms seen in the blood. Concomitant infections with a Plasmodium tropiduri-like malaria parasite were seen and were sometimes extremely heavy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0074-02762003000800016DOI Listing
December 2003

Gamma-ray-computed tomography to investigate compaction on sewage-sludge-treated soil.

Appl Radiat Isot 2003 Jul;59(1):17-25

Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, C.P. 96, C.E.P., SP 13.400-970 Piracicaba, Brazil.

Soil compaction is one of the fundamental parameters to evaluate the environmental impact of agricultural machinery traffic on soils. Compaction causes modifications on soil physical properties such as changes in porosity and structure that are related to soil water movement and gas exchange The objective of this work was to evaluate soil surface sealing after sewage-sludge application, and the influence of agricultural machinery traffic, through computed tomography. A first generation tomograph was used having a 137Cs source and a 3 in x 3 in NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Image analysis and tomographic unit profiles could successfully be used for the detection of soil surface sealing and soil compaction due to machinery traffic associated to sewage-sludge application.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0969-8043(03)00145-3DOI Listing
July 2003

Gamma-ray computed tomography to characterize soil surface sealing.

Appl Radiat Isot 2002 Sep;57(3):375-80

Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP. C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.

The application of sewage sludge as a fertilizer on soils may cause compacted surface layers (surface sealing), which can promote changes on soil physical properties. The objective of this work was to study the use of gamma-ray computed tomography, as a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of this sealing process through the measurement of soil bulk density distribution of the soil surface layer of samples subjected to sewage sludge application. Tomographic images were taken with a first generation tomograph with a resolution of 1 mm. The image analysis opened the possibility to obtain soil bulk density profiles and average soil bulk densities of the surface layer and to detect the presence of soil surface sealing. The sealing crust thickness was estimated to be in the range of 2-4 mm.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0969-8043(02)00098-2DOI Listing
September 2002