Publications by authors named "Manjit Bhamra"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dual mobility versus unipolar total hip arthroplasty for neck of femur fractures : a single centre study.

Acta Orthop Belg 2021 Mar;87(1):35-39

Current national guidelines (NICE) recommends that all medically fit, independently-mobile patients without cognitive impairment receive a total hip arTHAoplasty(THA) for displaced intracapsular neck of femur (NOF) fractures. Dislocation is a concern(2-10%). Dual mobility cups have been suggested to address this complication. Our study sets out to compare dislocation rates between dual mobility cups versus unipolar cups. We performed a retrospective single centre multiple surgeon study of all THAs performed for NOFs between January 2012 and May 2018. A total of 322 total hip replacements (127 dual mobility and 195 unipolar ; Age range of patients, 29 to 91, mean 70 years) were identified for analysis using a database. Data was obtained from electronic patient records and radiographs. 12 patients sustained a dislocation of their THA out of our 322 patients. Of these, 10 dislocations occurred in the unipolar group (5.13%). From the dual mobility cups, 2 had dislocations(1.57%), both with a 28mm head. Both of these dislocations were in alcohol dependent patients with increased susceptibility to falls. Statistical analysis of our data was performed using chi-squared test (p value = 0.0723) In 'Getting It Right First Time' (GIRFT), the authors recommend that all patients that sustain a NOF fracture meeting the criteria of a THA to be offered a dual mobility acetabular cup to reduce the risk of dislocation. The cost of the dual mobility acetabular cup is offset from the cost of overall revision surgery. Limitations of our study are its retrospective nature and selection bias.
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March 2021

What effect has the major trauma network had on perceptions of trauma care delivery amongst trauma teams in major trauma centres and neighbouring trauma units?

Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg 2021 Feb 26;47(1):171-177. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, UK.

Introduction: The Trauma network was established in April 2012 in England to improve the care of patients with trauma. The care of major trauma was centralised to major trauma centres. This article aims to survey trauma team members (TTM) to compare perceptions of trauma care delivery in major trauma centres (MTC) and trauma units (TU) from where major trauma care has been diverted.

Methods: Trauma team members (TTM) from six hospitals were interviewed between June and July 2016. This included three MTCs and their neighbouring TU. Data were also gathered to determine appropriate trauma qualifications of TTMs.

Results: TTMs in MTCs perceived the standard of trauma service improved (90% increased, 10% same) since April 2012 in comparison to TUs (10% increased, 63% same, 27% decreased) (p ≤ 0.001). In MTCs, TTMs felt their skills improved more (66% improved, 34% unchanged) compared to TU's (24% improved, 64% unchanged, 12% regressed) (p ≤ 0.001). TTM's in MTCs were more satisfied with their trauma teams training (p ≤ 0.001), leader's communication (p ≤ 0.001) and handover process (p ≤ 0.01) in comparison to TTMs in TUs. 69% of doctors in MTCs held valid trauma qualifications as compared to only 37% in TUs (p ≤ 0.001).

Conclusion: The centralisation of major trauma care to MTCs allows care for severely injured patients in specialised hospitals with allocated resources. This survey shows the effect of this reorganisation where diversion of major trauma from TUs may have led to their TTMs perceiving their standard of care to be less than TTMs in MTCs. This study recommends training support for TUs using modalities such as simulation-based training and regular audits to ensure improved perceptions and adequate qualifications. Multidisciplinary meetings between MTCs and TUs can allow information to be exchanged and shared to ensure reciprocal support and engagement to improve perception of trauma care delivery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00068-019-01206-1DOI Listing
February 2021

Uncemented metal-on-metal acetabular component: follow-up of 112 hips for a minimum of 5 years.

Acta Orthop 2007 Aug;78(4):470-8

Department of Orthopaedics, Rotherham District General Hospital, Rotherham, UK.

Background: Aseptic loosening is the major cause of implant failure. In cemented hip arthroplasty, failure of the acetabular side is mainly due to lysis caused by wear particles. By using an implant with low wear characteristics and by enhancing acetabular fixation using an uncemented implant, we aimed to reduce acetabular lysis and thereby loosening.

Patients And Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of 119 hips (101 patients) that had the Uncemented Fitmore cup (Sulzer Orthopedics). In 66 patients, the femoral component was CF-30 (Sulzer) used with cement. In the remaining 35 patients, thrust plate prosthesis (TPP) (Sulzer) was used. Of the 101 patients, 94 (112 hips) were available for study. Mean follow-up of the 94 patients was 7 (5-13) years.

Results: The mean preoperative Harris hip score was 38 and the mean postoperative Harris hip score was 89 at the last follow-up. Taking aseptic loosening as the endpoint, the survival rate of the Fitmore cup was 100% at 11 years.

Interpretation: The uncemented Fitmore acetabular cup with second generation metal-on-metal articulation showed good results with regard to aseptic loosening in the medium term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670710014103DOI Listing
August 2007

Early results with the thrust plate prosthesis in young patients with osteoarthritis of the hip.

Acta Orthop Belg 2005 Apr;71(2):182-8

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rotherham General Hospital, Rotherham, UK.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of the Thrust Plate Prosthesis as a treatment option for osteoarthritis of the hip in young patients. Of the fifty patients (63 hips) reviewed, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) females. Pre-operative diagnosis included primary osteoarthritis (23), developmental dysplasia (8), avascular necrosis (7), Perthes (4), post-traumatic arthritis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (2), ankylosing spondylitis (1), psoriatic arthropathy (1) and slipped upper femoral epiphysis (1). All components were implanted uncemented with metal-on-metal articulation. The average follow-up was 4.04 years (range 12 months-8.5 years). The mean age of the patients was 42.3 years (range 21-57 years). The mean pre-operative Harris Hip Score was 41.9 (range 12-89) and at final follow-up 89.91 (range 41-100). In 25 hips with > or = 5 yr follow-up, the average HHS at final follow-up was 84.5 (range 50-100). Complications included dislocation (2), transient sciatic nerve palsy (1), discomfort from lateral strap (2), implantation of wrong femoral head (1), revision (3 = 4.76%) and implant loosening (4) (6.35%). The thrust plate prosthesis is a useful alternative in young patients with hip arthritis and the results are comparable with other uncemented hip replacements. The added advantage is preservation of the proximal femoral bone stock, which can prove useful in future revisions.
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April 2005

Changes in metal levels and chromosome aberrations in the peripheral blood of patients after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

J Arthroplasty 2004 Dec;19(8 Suppl 3):78-83

University of Bristol, Orthopaedic Surgery, BIRC-Bristol Implant Research Center, Bristol, UK.

A prospective study was performed to investigate changes in metal levels and chromosome aberrations in patients within 2 years of receiving metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties. There was a statistically significant increase of cobalt and chromium concentrations, with a small increase in molybdenum, in whole blood at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. There was also a statistically significant increase of both chromosome translocations and aneuploidy in peripheral blood lymphocytes at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The changes were generally progressive with time, but the change in aneuploidy was much greater than in chromosome translocations. No statistically significant correlations were found in secondary analyses between chromosome translocation indices and cobalt or chromium concentration in whole blood. Although the clinical consequences of these changes, if any, are unknown, future epidemiological studies could usefully include direct comparisons of patients with implants of different composition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2004.09.010DOI Listing
December 2004
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