Publications by authors named "Manasi Deshpande"

7 Publications

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A Critical Review and Scientific Prospective on Contraceptive Therapeutics from Ayurveda and Allied Ancient Knowledge.

Front Pharmacol 2021 3;12:629591. Epub 2021 Jun 3.

Department of DravyagunaVigynan, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University, College of Ayurved, Pune, India.

Commonly used synthetic or prescribed hormonal drugs are known to interfere with the endocrine system and may have adverse reproductive, neurological, developmental, and metabolic effects in the body. These may also produce adverse effects such as polycystic ovarian disorder, endometriosis, early puberty, infertility or toxicity to gonads, testicular germ cell cancer, breast or prostate cancer, brain developmental problems, and even birth defects. Globally, the emergence of renewed interest in natural products for reproductive health is on the rise, which offers opportunities for new contraceptive developments. The search for alternate, safer contraceptive products or agents of natural origin is of scientific interest. Ayurvedic classical texts offer knowledge and information about the reproductive function and therapeutics including those for enhancement and limiting male and female fertility. Review of ancient, medieval, and recent-including texts on erotica that provide information on approaches and large numbers of formulations and drugs of plant, mineral or animal origin-claimed to have sterilizing, contraceptive, abortifacient, and related properties is presented. Few among these are known to be toxic and few are not so common. However, most of the formulations, ingredients, or modes of administration have remained unattended to, due to issues related to consumer compliance and limitations of standardization and lack of appropriate validation modalities. Several of these ingredients have been studied for their phytoconstituents and for the variety of pharmacological activities. Efforts to standardize several classical dosage forms and attempts to adapt to modern technologies have been made. List of formulations, ingredients, and their properties linked with known constituents, pharmacological, biological, and toxicity studies have been provided in a series of tables. The possible effectiveness and safety of selected formulations and ingredients have been examined. Suggestions based on new drug delivery systems integrated with advances in biotechnology, to provide prospects for new therapeutics for contraception, have been considered. Ayurveda is built on a holistic paradigm of biological entity rather than limited gonadal functions. Graphic presentation of a few carefully chosen possibilities has been depicted. New approaches to standardization and ethnopharmacological validation of natural contraceptive therapeutics may offer novel mechanisms and modalities and therapeutic opportunities to satisfy unmet needs of contraception.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2021.629591DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8210421PMC
June 2021

Corrigendum: Phytochemicals in Cancer Treatment: From Preclinical Studies to Clinical Practice.

Front Pharmacol 2020 28;11:175. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2019.01614.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.00175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7058694PMC
February 2020

Phytochemicals in Cancer Treatment: From Preclinical Studies to Clinical Practice.

Front Pharmacol 2019 28;10:1614. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States.

Cancer is a severe health problem that continues to be a leading cause of death worldwide. Increasing knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer progression has led to the development of a vast number of anticancer drugs. However, the use of chemically synthesized drugs has not significantly improved the overall survival rate over the past few decades. As a result, new strategies and novel chemoprevention agents are needed to complement current cancer therapies to improve efficiency. Naturally occurring compounds from plants known as phytochemicals, serve as vital resources for novel drugs and are also sources for cancer therapy. Some typical examples include taxol analogs, vinca alkaloids such as vincristine, vinblastine, and podophyllotoxin analogs. These phytochemicals often act regulating molecular pathways which are implicated in growth and progression of cancer. The specific mechanisms include increasing antioxidant status, carcinogen inactivation, inhibiting proliferation, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis; and regulation of the immune system. The primary objective of this review is to describe what we know to date of the active compounds in the natural products, along with their pharmacologic action and molecular or specific targets. Recent trends and gaps in phytochemical based anticancer drug discovery are also explored. The authors wish to expand the phytochemical research area not only for their scientific soundness but also for their potential druggability. Hence, the emphasis is given to information about anticancer phytochemicals which are evaluated at preclinical and clinical level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2019.01614DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7025531PMC
January 2020

Experiential documentation of Trimad for its anti-obesity potential: A survey of Ayurvedic physicians from Pune city.

J Ayurveda Integr Med 2017 Jul - Sep;8(3):190-193. Epub 2017 Aug 16.

Obesity Research Lab, Interactive Research School for Health Affairs, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University, Dhankawadi, Pune-Satara Road, Maharashtra, Pune 411043, India. Electronic address:

Background: Trimad is an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation consisting of tubers of Mustaka (Cyperus rotundus), fruits of Vidanga (Embelia ribes) and roots of Chitraka (Plumbago zeylanica). It is recommended in Ayurveda for the management of obesity. However, there is no documented evidence about its safety and efficacy. Hence, as a first step, we carried out a survey to find out its usage by Ayurvedic physicians and their personal clinical experiences while using the formulation.

Methodology: A questionnaire was designed which included questions regarding the usage, dosage, formulation, safety and tolerability of Trimad. After obtaining Ethics Committee permission, the questionnaire was administered to 86 physicians. Out of 86, the data obtained from 70 physicians who filled the complete information, was analyzed. The data are presented as percentages.

Results: Sixty seven percentage physicians were found to use Trimad for management of obesity. The commonly used form of Trimad was churna administered along with luke warm water as an adjuvant. The criteria for selection of drug informed by the physicians were Ayurvedic signs & symptoms followed by conventional anthropometry. The average efficacy rating for Trimad on scale of 1-10 was found to be 5.

Conclusion: The survey revealed that Trimad is being used by large number of Ayurvedic physicians for the management of obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaim.2017.03.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5607389PMC
August 2017

Does Welfare Inhibit Success? The Long-Term Effects of Removing Low-Income Youth from the Disability Rolls.

Authors:
Manasi Deshpande

Am Econ Rev 2016 Nov;106(11):3300-30

Department of Economics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

I estimate the effects of removing low-income youth with disabilities from Supplemental Security Income (SSI) on their earnings and income in adulthood. Using a regression discontinuity design based on a 1996 policy change in age 18 medical reviews, I find that youth who are removed from SSI at age 18 recover one-third of the lost SSI cash income in earnings. SSI youth who are removed and stay off SSI earn on average $4,400 annually, and they lose $76,000 in present discounted observed income over the 16 years following removal relative to those who do not receive a review.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1257/aer.20151129DOI Listing
November 2016

Evaluating the anti-inflammatory potential of Tectaria cicutaria L. rhizome extract in vitro as well as in vivo.

J Ethnopharmacol 2013 Oct 27;150(1):215-22. Epub 2013 Aug 27.

Interactive Research School for Health Affairs (IRSHA), Bharati Vidyapeeth University, Katraj-Dhankawadi, Pune-Satara Road, Pune-411043, Maharashtra, India.

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: The rhizome of Tectaria cicutaria has been used in the folklore system of Indian traditional medicine (Ayurveda) for the treatment of various disorders such as rheumatic pain, chest complaints, burns, sprain, poisonous bites, tonsilitis, toothache, gum complaints, cuts and wounds. The present work has for the first time tried to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of aqueous extract of Tectaria cicutaria rhizome (TCRaq) in vitro as well as in vivo.

Materials And Methods: Anti-inflammatory potential of TCRaq was analyzed in vivo in carrageenan induced rat paw edema model. Serum antioxidant status in TCRaq-treated as well as untreated control rodents was measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. In vitro experiments for analyzing the anti-inflammatory potential of TCRaq were performed on murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Analysis of nitric oxide release in RAW 264.7 cells was done by Griess reaction. RT-PCR and western blotting experiment was performed to analyze the expression of iNOS. Expression of COX-2 and NFκB proteins was evaluated by western blotting.

Results: TCRaq significantly reduced the paw volume in Sprague-Dawley rats at a dose of 200mg/kg body weight, which was comparable with the standard diclofenac treatment. The rats treated with TCRaq showed a significant increase in the serum antioxidant levels compared to the untreated control animals. TCRaq was able to reduce the nitric oxide (NO) levels in RAW 264.7 cells that had been stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This was accompanied by a corresponding decrease in iNOS expression at mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, TCRaq was found to decrease the expression of COX-2 as well as the nuclear translocation of NFκB in RAW 264.7 cells.

Conclusion: Our study signifies the anti-inflammatory potential of Tectaria cicutaria and scientifically validates its traditional use in inflammatory conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2013.08.025DOI Listing
October 2013

Scientific basis for the use of Indian ayurvedic medicinal plants in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders: ashwagandha.

Cent Nerv Syst Agents Med Chem 2010 Sep;10(3):238-46

Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Laval, Québec, Canada G1K 7P4, Canada.

Ayurveda is a Sanskrit word, which means "the scripture for longevity". It represents an ancient system of traditional medicine prevalent in India and in several other south Asian countries. It is based on a holistic view of treatment which is believed to cure human diseases through establishment of equilibrium in the different elements of human life, the body, the mind, the intellect and the soul [1]. Ayurveda dates back to the period of the Indus Valley civilization (about 3000 B.C) and has been passed on through generations of oral tradition, like the other four sacred texts (Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda and Atharvanaveda) which were composed between 12(th) and 7(th) century B.C [2, 3]. References to the herbal medicines of Ayurveda are found in all of the other four Vedas, suggesting that Ayurveda predates the other Vedas by at least several centuries. It was already in full practice at the time of Buddha (6(th) century B.C) and had produced two of the greatest physicians of ancient India, Charaka and Shushrutha who composed the basic texts of their trade, the Samhitas. By this time, ayurveda had already developed eight different subspecialties of medical treatment, named Ashtanga, which included surgery, internal medicine, ENT, pediatrics, toxicology, health and longevity, and spiritual healing [4]. Ayurvedic medicine was mainly composed of herbal preparations which were occasionally combined with different levels of other compounds, as supplements [5]. In the Ayurvedic system, the herbs used for medicinal purposes are classed as brain tonics or rejuvenators. Among the plants most often used in Ayurveda are, in the descending order of importance: (a) Ashwagandha, (b) Brahmi, (c) Jatamansi, (d) Jyotishmati, (e) Mandukparni, (f) Shankhapushpi, and (g) Vacha. The general appearance of these seven plants is shown in Fig.1. Their corresponding Latin names, as employed in current scientific literature, the botanical families that each of them belongs to, their normal habitats in different areas of the world, as well as the common synonyms by which they are known, are shown in the Table 1. The scientific investigations concerning the best known and most scientifically investigated of these herbs, Ashwagandha will be discussed in detail in this review. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera, WS), also commonly known, in different parts of the world, as Indian ginseng, Winter cherry, Ajagandha, Kanaje Hindi and Samm Al Ferakh, is a plant belonging to the Solanaceae family. It is also known in different linguistic areas in India by its local vernacular names [6]. It grows prolifically in dry regions of South Asia, Central Asia and Africa, particularly in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, South Africa, Egypt, Morocco, Congo and Jordon [7]. In India, it is cultivated, on a commercial scale, in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Gujarat and Rajasthan [6]. In Sanskrit, ashwagandha, the Indian name for WS, means "odor of the horse", probably originating from the odor of its root which resembles that of a sweaty horse. The name"somnifera" in Latin means "sleep-inducer" which probably refers to its extensive use as a remedy against stress from a variety of daily chores. Some herbalists refer to ashwagandha as Indian ginseng, since it is used in India, in a way similar to how ginseng is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a large variety of human diseases [8]. Ashwagandha is a shrub whose various parts (berries, leaves and roots) have been used by Ayurvedic practitioners as folk remedies, or as aphrodisiacs and diuretics. The fresh roots are sometimes boiled in milk, in order to leach out undesirable constituents. The berries are sometimes used as a substitute to coagulate milk in cheese making. In Ayurveda, the herbal preparation is referred to as a "rasayana", an elixir that works, in a nonspecific, global fashion, to increase human health and longevity. It is also considered an adaptogen, a nontoxic medication that normalizes physiological functions, disturbed by chronic stress, through correction of imbalances in the neuroendocrine and immune systems [9, 10]. The scientific research that has been carried out on Ashwagandha and other ayurvedic herbal medicines may be classified into three major categories, taking into consideration the endogenous or exogenous phenomena that are known to cause physiological disequilibrium leading to the pathological state; (A) pharmacological and therapeutic effects of extracts, purified compounds or multi-herbal mixtures on specific non-neurological diseases; (B) pharmacological and therapeutic effects of extracts, purified compounds or multi-herbal mixtures on neurodegenerative disorders; and (C) biochemical, physiological and genetic studies on the herbal plants themselves, in order to distinguish between those originating from different habitats, or to improve the known medicinal quality of the indigenous plant. Some of the major points on its use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are described below.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871524911006030238DOI Listing
September 2010