Publications by authors named "Majid Zia"

7 Publications

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Overnight, room temperature hold of whole blood followed by 42-day storage of red blood cells in additive solution-7.

Transfusion 2015 Mar 19;55(3):485-90. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Background: Overnight, room temperature hold (ONH) of whole blood before component processing offers several benefits. This study evaluated the storage and in vivo recovery characteristics of ONH red blood cells (RBCs) stored in additive solution-7 (AS-7).

Study Design And Methods: We conducted a three-center, three-arm evaluation of a new blood collection system with AS-7 compared to leukoreduced RBCs processed within 8 hours and stored in AS-1 (control). Whole blood (500 ± 50 mL) from healthy research subjects (n = 240) was held at room temperature 0 to 2 hours, 6 to 8 hours, or ONH (18-24 hr) before component processing and storage at 1 to 6 °C. RBCs were evaluated on Days 42 and 56 with a panel of in vitro assays. Subsets of the AS-7-stored RBCs were evaluated for (51) Cr 24-hour in vivo recovery and long-term survival.

Results: Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in ONH RBCs were not different than AS-7 RBCs prepared within 8 hours. ATP was higher in the ONH group on Day 42 than control, and ATP was maintained in all AS-7 groups through Day 56. ONH units had 0.36 ± 0.14% on Day 42 hemolysis (60/60 < 0.8%), and 0.54 ± 0.22% on Day 56 (10/60 > 0.8%, 2/60 > 1%). In vivo recoveries of stored RBCs were not different between the AS-7 arms at 42 days (p = 0.16; 27/27 ONH units > 75%), but the Day 56 ONH was significantly less than ONH on Day 42 (p = 0.008; 7/28 < 75%).

Conclusions: Overnight hold of whole blood at room temperature before component processing meets current regulatory requirements when RBCs are stored up to 42 days in AS-7.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.12868DOI Listing
March 2015

Additive solution-7 reduces the red blood cell cold storage lesion.

Transfusion 2015 Mar 19;55(3):491-8. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Hoxworth Blood Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio; Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Background: Transfusion of long-stored red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with decreased in vivo RBC recovery, delivery of RBC breakdown products, and increased morbidity and mortality. Reducing the burden of this RBC "storage lesion" is a major challenge in transfusion medicine. Additive solution-7 (AS-7) is a new RBC storage solution designed to improve RBC metabolism by providing phosphate and increasing buffering capacity.

Study Design And Methods: Storage quality in AS-7 was measured in a prospective, randomized, three-center trial using units of whole blood from healthy human subjects whose RBCs were stored for up to 56 days in AS-7 (n = 120) or for 42 days in the control solution AS-1 (n = 60).

Results: Hemolysis and shedding of protein-containing microvesicles were significantly reduced in RBCs stored in AS-7 for 42 and 56 days compared with RBCs stored in AS-1. Autologous in vivo recoveries of RBCs stored in AS-7 was 88 ± 5% at 42 days (n = 27) and 82 ± 3% at 56 days (n = 27), exceeding recoveries of RBCs stored in currently used solutions.

Conclusion: Increasing the phosphate, pH range, and buffer capacity of a RBC storage system allowed RBCs to be stored better and longer than currently approved storage systems. AS-7 ameliorates the long-term storage lesion resulting in significantly increased viability in vitro and in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.12867DOI Listing
March 2015

The bioequivalence of frozen plasma prepared from whole blood held overnight at room temperature compared to fresh-frozen plasma prepared within eight hours of collection.

Transfusion 2015 Mar 19;55(3):476-84. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Background: Overnight, room temperature hold of whole blood (WB) before leukoreduction and component processing offers significant logistic and cost advantages over WB processed within 8 hours. Plasma prepared from WB held at room temperature overnight (PF24RT24WB) may result in a degradation of plasma coagulation protein activities compared to plasma frozen within 8 hours of collection. In this study, we intended to evaluate the bioequivalence (BE) of PF24RT24WB prepared using a new WB collection, leukoreduction, and storage system compared to fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) after 12 months of frozen storage.

Study Design And Methods: We conducted a three-center, three-arm evaluation of the LEUKOSEP HWB-600-XL test system (Hemerus Medical LLC) compared to the RZ2000 control (Fenwal, Inc.). FFP was prepared from WB held at room temperature more than 6 hours and placed at less than -18 °C by 8 hours for control (n = 60) and test (n = 60) arms. PF24RT24WB (n = 60) was prepared with the test system from WB held at room temperature and then filtered and processed 20 to 24 hours postcollection. Frozen plasma was tested at 3, 6, and 12 months using a comprehensive panel of protein and coagulation factor assays.

Results: The test FFP was BE for all coagulation factors and tested proteins at 12 months. As expected, PF24RT24WB had a reduced Factor (F)VIII activity compared to control FFP (87.1%; 90% confidence interval, 79.4%-93.3%) with the lower confidence limit less than 80%. All other factors were within the BE region.

Conclusion: Leukoreduced FFP and PF24RT24WB prepared using the LEUKOSEP HWB-600-XL system has been shown to be BE to control leukoreduced FFP with an expected decrease in FVIII activity after overnight hold.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.12864DOI Listing
March 2015

AS-7 improved in vitro quality of red blood cells prepared from whole blood held overnight at room temperature.

Transfusion 2015 Jan 15;55(1):108-14. Epub 2014 Jul 15.

Research & Development, Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Background: Extended room temperature (RT) hold of whole blood (WB) may affect the quality of red blood cell (RBC) components produced from these donations. The availability of better RBC additive solutions (ASs) may help reduce the effects. A new AS, AS-7 (SOLX, Haemonetics Corporation), was investigated for improved in vitro quality of RBCs prepared from WB held overnight at RT.

Study Design And Methods: Sixteen WB units were held for 21.4 hours ± 40 minutes at 22°C on cooling plates before processing. Each pair of ABO-matched WB units were pooled, divided into a WB filter pack containing saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol (control) and a LEUKOSEP WB-filter pack containing SOLX, and processed according to manufacturer's instructions. RBCs were stored at 2 to 6°C and sampled weekly until expiry. Glycophorin A (GPA+) and annexin V-binding microparticles (MPs) were quantitated using flow cytometry. Osmotic fragility, intracellular pH (pHi), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), and routine quality variables were measured. Adhesion of RBCs to human endothelial cells (ECs) was evaluated by flow perfusion under low shear stress (0.5 dyne/cm(2) ), similar to low blood flow in microvessels.

Results: ATP and 2,3-DPG levels were improved for SOLX-RBCs. SOLX-RBCs maintained higher pHi, increased resistance to hypotonic stress, and reduced numbers of GPA+ MPs. No significant difference was observed between annexin V binding to MPs or adhesion of RBCs to ECs under shear stress.

Conclusion: SOLX-stored RBCs showed increased osmotic resistance, pHi, and reduced GPA+ MPs and together with higher ATP and 2,3-DPG levels demonstrated improved in vitro RBC quality measures during 42 days of storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.12779DOI Listing
January 2015

Effects of nicotine on an in vitro reconstituted model oral mucosa in terms of cytokine production.

J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 2011 Oct-Dec;23(4):80-4

Department of Oral Pathology, Baqai Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan.

Background: The extensive use of tobacco and its associated problematic health issues have been a concern to mankind. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that approximately one-third of the global population aged 15 years or older are smokers and each smoker consumes an average of 15 cigarettes daily. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of nicotine on an in vitro reconstituted oral mucosa model, the effect of treatment with this compound was measured in terms of cytokine production.

Method: Observational laboratory based study design was used to carry out the experiment. The reconstituted human epithelium model used in the study was prepared and supplied by Skin Ethic Laboratories, Nice, France. The effect of nicotine on epithelial cytokine production was assessed using commercially available assay kits (R&D systems). This was done using the enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay.

Result: In this study there was evidence that after 5 minutes treatment on un-inflamed mucosa with nicotine at 10 mm concentration GM-CSF release decreased, and also after 24 hours treatment with nicotine at 10mM concentration GM-CSF release increased. TNF-alpha increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and also GM-CSF from the model mucosa after 24 hours, but had no effect on the release of IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF after 5 minutes and 24 hours respectively.

Conclusion: In conclusion at all the concentrations used in this experiment, nicotine had no effect on the TNF-alpha stimulated tissue and un-inflamed mucosa and had no significant effect on cytokine release including IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF after 5 minutes and 24 hours respectively.
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April 2013

Comparison of distance between maxillary central incisors and incisive papilla in dentate individuals with different arch forms.

J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):125-8

Department of Prosthodontics, Dental Section, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Background: After loss of natural teeth, provision of prosthodontic services almost becomes necessity in the present day living. To provide effective mastication teeth have peculiar forms. To make it more efficient both functionally and biologically, they are arranged in particular geometric manner referred to as dental arch. The objective of this study was to compare the distance between mesial edge of the maxillary central incisors and posterior border of the incisive papilla in dentate individuals with different arch forms.

Methods: After sample selection, impressions were made for upper and lower arches and the resultant casts were standardised. Arch forms were assessed by their morphological description. Measurements on cast were recorded for incisive papilla (IP) and maxillary central incisor (CI) distance after securing it on cast surveyor.

Results: Ovoid arch form was the most frequently observed arch form both in males (57%) and females (68%) while their combination (Ovoid Square and Ovoid tapered) were the least commonly observed arch forms (4% and 5% each). Gender seems to be important in about 1/4th of the dentate individuals, regarding both the type of the arches and CI-IP distance.

Conclusion: Ovoid type of arches was the commonest arch form seen in either sex. There is no significant difference between males and females in 3/4th of dentate individuals, regarding the type of dental arch as well as CI-IP distance.
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January 2011

In vitro and in vivo evaluation of LEUKOSEP HRC-600-C leukoreduction filtration system for red cells.

Transfusion 2006 Aug;46(8):1311-5

Cell Labeling Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, USA.

Background: Documentation of the benefits of leukoreduction has led to the increased use of this technique and the need for development of efficient and effective techniques for its accomplishment. This study investigated the in vitro properties and in vivo autologous radiolabeled recovery of leukoreduced red cells (RBCs) produced through a leukoreduction filtration system for RBCs (LEUKOSEP HRC-600-C, Hemerus Medical).

Study Design And Methods: Normal subjects donated 36 units of RBCs that were leukoreduced on Days 0, 3, or 5 through a "hands-off" technique. Biochemical studies were performed before and after filtration and at the end of 42 days of storage. Units leukoreduced on Days 0 or 5 were held until Day 42 and used for autologous radiolabeled return to determine recovery with 51Cr single-label radiolabeling techniques.

Results: Leukoreduction filtration was accomplished in 16.3 +/- 2 minutes on Day 0 at room temperature or 27 to 30 minutes on Days 3 or 5 after refrigeration. Leukoreduction efficiency was 4.6 +/- 0.6 log with a median residual white blood cell (WBC) content of fewer than 3.3 x 10(4) WBCs per unit. RBC recovery was 90 +/- 2 percent. Hemolysis was 0.34 +/- 0.16 percent at the end of 42 days of storage. The in vivo recovery of radiolabeled RBCs 24 hours after autologous return was 80.6 +/- 4.5 percent for RBC units leukoreduced on Days 0 and 5 combined.

Conclusion: The LEUKOSEP HRC-600-C WBC reduction filtration system produced leukoreduced RBCs efficiently and effectively with acceptable poststorage biochemical measures and posttransfusion recovery after 42 days of storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00897.xDOI Listing
August 2006