Publications by authors named "Mahshid Vakili"

5 Publications

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Relationship between spirometry results and colonisation of Aspergillus species in allergic asthma.

Clin Respir J 2020 Mar 26. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Department of Medical Mycology, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

Introduction And Objectives: Exposure to fungi in patients with asthma leads to the release of various fungal antigens, which can increase the severity of asthma. Regarding this, the present study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between the colonisation of Aspergillus species and spirometry results in allergic asthma.

Materials And Methods: Two hundred sixteen patients with mild to severe asthma and 30 healthy controls were included. All participants underwent pulmonary function tests. Furthermore, sputum samples were collected from each subject. Each sputum sample was subjected to direct microscopic examination and fungal culture. All cultured Aspergillus colonies were identified at species level by molecular methods. Finally, all available data from sputum culture and spirometry test were analysed.

Results: Out of 216 sputum samples, 145 (67.1%) were positive for fungal growth. Furthermore, out of 264 grown fungal colonies, 137 (51.9%) were Aspergillus species. Among the Aspergillus isolates, A. flavus (29.2%) was the most prevalent species, followed by A. fumigatus (27.7%). The mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in the mild, moderate and severe asthmatic patients with a positive sputum culture for fungi were obtained as 90.0 ± 11.1, 71.1 ± 15.9 and 54.9 ± 16.4, respectively. In general, Aspergillus species colonisation had no statistically significant effect on spirometry results of study patients.

Conclusion: Our results showed that there is no difference in the FEV1 and forced vital capacity between Aspergillus positive and negative patients in any asthma severity group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/crj.13192DOI Listing
March 2020

Prevalence of specific immunoglobulin E and G against in patients with asthma.

Curr Med Mycol 2018 Dec;4(4):7-11

Invasive Fungi Research Centre, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

Background And Purpose: as a ubiquitous fungus can be found in the respiratory tract of the asthmatic and healthy people. The inhalation of spores leads to an immune response in individuals with asthma and results in the aggravation of the clinical symptoms. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of specific immunoglobulin E and G IgE and IgG) against in asthmatic patients.

Materials And Methods: This study was conducted on 200 consecutive patients with moderate to severe asthma referring to Masih Daneshvari hospital Tehran, Iran, from January 2016 to February 2018. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed in all subjects with allergens. Moreover, all patients underwent specific IgE testing for using Hycor method. Enzyme immune assay was applied to measure total IgE and specific IgG.

Results: According to the results, the mean age of the patients was 45.8 years (age range: 18-78 years). The mean levels of total IgE and specific IgE in asthmatic patients were obtained as 316.3 (range: 6-1300 IU/ml) and 1.5 (range: 0.1-61.3 IU/ml), respectively. Out of 200 patients, 27 (13.5%), 65 (32.5%), 22 (11.0%), and 86 (43.0%) cases had positive SPT, total IgE of > 417 IU/ml, specific IgE, and IgG, respectively. The level of these variables in patients with severe asthma were 16 (16.5%), 36 (37.1%), 15 (15.5%), and 46 (47.4%), respectively.

Conclusion: As the findings indicated, reactivity to is a remarkable phenomenon in asthmatic patients. It is also emphasised that the climatic condition may affect the positive rate of hypersensitivity to .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/cmm.4.4.380DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6386509PMC
December 2018

Fungal epidemiology in cystic fibrosis patients with a special focus on Scedosporium species complex.

Microb Pathog 2019 Apr 8;129:168-175. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Center of Expertise in Microbiology, Infection Biology and Antimicrobial Pharmacology, Tehran, Iran.

In this present study, for the first time, we evaluated the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients for the Scedosporium species and their antifungal susceptibility against eight antifungal agents. During one-year period, 90 Sputum samples were collected from Iranian CF patients. All samples were evaluated by direct microscopic examination, culture onto four different media including Malt extract agar, Inhibitory mold agar, Brain Heart Infusion and Scedo-Select III. The mold isolated fungi were identified by PCR-Sequencing of ITS and β-tubulin genes. In-vitro antifungal susceptibility was performed according to the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M38-A2 guidelines. Out of 90 CF patients, 47 (52.2%) were male. The age of the patients ranged from 1 to 34 years (median of 15.84 ± 7.41 years). Overall, 3 (3.3%) cases were positive for Scedosporium spp. of which two isolates were characterized as Scedosporium boydii and one isolate as S. ellipsoideum. Among Aspergillus genus, A. flavus (29.4%) was the most prevalent species followed by A. tubingensis (24.7%), A. niger (17.0%) and A. fumigatus (14.5%). The minimum effective concentration ranges of micafungin, anidulafungin, and caspofungin were 0.008-0.031 μg/mL, 0.0625-0.25 μg/mL, and 0.0625-0.25 μg/mL, respectively. All isolates of Scedosporium species showed high minimum inhibitory concentration to the triazoles tested, except voriconazole. Our results showed that A. flavus and Scedosporium species are the most prevalent molds isolated from CF patient populations in Iran. Our findings have also showed that Scedo-Select III can be used as a reliable culture media for isolation of Scedosporium spp. in clinical samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2019.02.009DOI Listing
April 2019

Novel Point Mutations in and Genes Associated with Itraconazole and Posaconazole Resistance in Isolates.

Microb Drug Resist 2019 Jun 18;25(5):652-662. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

1 Invasive Fungi Research Center (IFRC), School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

is a common environmental species known to cause occupational allergic disease in grain handlers. We have recently observed azole-resistant isolates of this fungus as a cause of onychomycosis. To further characterize the cause of resistance, the genes encoding 14 α-sterol demethylase enzyme ( and ) were characterized and analyzed in 9 ITC-susceptible isolates and 6 isolates with high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of clinical (nail and sputum) and environmental strains. We found that six isolates with itraconazole MIC >16 mg/L demonstrated nonsynonymous mutations, including V51I, L378P, E483K, and E506G, and synonymous mutations, including F53F, A186A, Q276Q, and H359H. Moreover, P486S was detected in five strains with ITR MIC >16 mg/L. One mutation, F324S, was detected in an isolate with posaconazole MIC >16 mg/L. The effect of E483K and P486S mutations of CYP51A on azole resistance was further investigated using homology modeling and molecular dynamics. We found that E483K and P486S mutations were located near the ligand access channel of CYP51A that could partly lead to narrowing the entry of the ligand access channels. Therefore, we concluded that E483K and P486S mutations may potentially contribute to the limited access of inhibitors to the binding pocket and therefore confer resistance to azole agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2018.0300DOI Listing
June 2019

Fungal vaccines, mechanism of actions and immunology: A comprehensive review.

Biomed Pharmacother 2019 Jan 3;109:333-344. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Department of Medical Mycology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; Immunology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Fungal infections include a wide range of opportunistic and invasive diseases. Two of four major fatal diseases in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are related to the fungal infections, cryptococcosis, and pneumocystosis. Disseminated candidiasis and different clinical forms of aspergillosis annually impose expensive medical costs to governments and hospitalized patients and ultimately lead to high mortality rates. Therefore, urgent implementations are necessary to prevent the expansion of these diseases. Designing an effective vaccine is one of the most important approaches in this field. So far, numerous efforts have been carried out in developing an effective vaccine against fungal infections. Some of these challenges engaged in different stages of clinical trials but none of them could be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, in addition to have a comprehensive overview on the data from studied vaccine programs, we will discuss the immunology response against fungal infections. Moreover, it will be attempted to clarify the underlying immune mechanisms of vaccines targeting different fungal infections that are crucial for designing an effective vaccination strategy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2018.10.075DOI Listing
January 2019