Mahmoud Mansour, Ph.D - College of Pharmacy - Professor

Mahmoud Mansour

Ph.D

College of Pharmacy

Professor

Al-Riyadh, --- Select One --- | Saudi Arabia

Main Specialties: Biochemical Genetics

Additional Specialties: Molecular Biology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5433-9590

Mahmoud Mansour, Ph.D - College of Pharmacy - Professor

Mahmoud Mansour

Ph.D

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: College of Pharmacy - Al-Riyadh, --- Select One --- , Saudi Arabia

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Mahmoud Mansour’s Resume / CV

Education

Aug 2012 - Jul 2005
King Saud University and king Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences
Professor
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Apr 2005 - May 2005
Al-Azhar University
Professor
Biochemistry Department
Apr 1990 - Jan 1993
Karolinska Institutet
Ph.D
College of Medicine
Jan 1987 - Aug 1989
Al-Azhar University
Master Degree in Biochemistry
Pharmacy College
Nov 1985 - Nov 1985
Al-Azhar University
Deploma
Diploma of Clinical Chemistry
Jul 1978 - Jul 1984
Al-Azhar University
Bachelor of Pharmacy
Pharmacy College

Experience

Aug 2012 - Nov 1998
State Encourgement Award
Assistant Professor
Scientific Research Academy

Publications

21Publications

485Reads

36Profile Views

Topical versus subconjunctival anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy (Bevacizumab, Ranibizumab and Aflibercept) for treatment of corneal neovascularization

Saudi Journal of Ophthalmology (2017) 31, 99–105

Saudi Journal of Ophthalmology

In order to evaluate the effect of topical and subconjunctival anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy, Ranibizumab,
Bevacizumab and Aflibercept as a therapy for corneal neovascularization (NV) treatment, the aim of this study was to review all data related to some of anti-VEGF as a promising therapies for corneal NV treatment.
Corneal NV is a dangerous condition leading to a marked reduction in vision due to angiogenesis of abnormal vessels that block light. During the recent years, we have recognized new drug proliferation for corneal NV treatment. Recently, anti-VEGF therapies are one of the most important drugs used for corneal NV treatment.
Several growth factors are involved in angiogenesis. The most important growth factor in corneal angiogenesis is VEGF. VEGF can be considered as key mediators in corneal angiogenesis. It is upregulated during corneal NV. In fact, anti-VEGF therapies have shown efficacy in attenuation of corneal NV in both animal models and clinical trials. A promising therapeutic success has been achieved using antibodies directed against VEGF. Bevacizumab has demonstrated efficacy and efficiency in the treatment of different neo-vascular ocular diseases and it has partially reduced corneal NV through different routes of administrations: topical,
subconjunctival, and intraocular application. A similar efficacy to bevacizumab profiles in the treatment of neo-vascular agerelated macular degeneration was induced by ranibizumab. Moreover, at worse levels of initial visual acuity of diabetic macular edema, aflibercept was more effective at improving vision.
Anti-VEGF agents (Bevacizumab, Ranibizumab and Aflibercept) seem to have a higher efficiency and efficacy for corneal NV treatment.
Both subconjunctival therapy and topical therapy of bevacizumab prohibit corneal NV, while early treatment with subconjunctival administration of ranibizumab may successfully reduce corneal NV. Therefore, establishment of safe doses is highly important before these drugs can be involved in the clinical setting. Further investigations and studies are highly warranted to adjust the dose and route of administration for the antibodies directed against VEGF to be the key therapeutic agents in the corneal NV treatment.

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February 2020

Comparison of the effectiveness of equal doses of short and long-acting erythrocyte stimulating agents for managing anemia in chronic kidney disease adult patients

International Journal of Medical Research & Health Sciences, 2016, 5, 12:335-342

International Journal of Medical Research & Health Sciences

Anemia is the most common side effect in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) mainly due to lower levels of
erythropoietin (EPO) hormone. The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of equivalent doses of
erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs): short acting (Eprex®; Epoetin alfa) and long acting (Darbepoetin alfa:
DA) in the treatment of anemia of CKD adult patients treated from September 2013 to January 2015. A total of fifty
five patients were included; 22 patients were treated with Eprex®® (Epoetin alfa) and 33 patients received DA.
Different blood indices were assessed in the initial 8 weeks. The equality of the doses was based on the conversion
formula (1 μg of DA = 300 IU Eprex®). Treatment with lower dose of DA (0.64±0.07 μg/kg QW) induced a
significant increase in hemoglobin (Hb) from week 4 through week 8, while red blood corpuscles (RBCs) and
hematocrit (Hct) were significantly elevated in week 8. A significant increase in Hb and Hct were observed starting
from week 2 through week 8 parallel with a significant rise in RBCs count, starting from week 3 through week 8
after treatment with DA (0.8±0.06 μg/kg QW), while a significant increment of Hb and Hct were noticed after
treatment with DA (1.215±0.11 μg/kg QW) from week 3 to week 7. Administration of higher dose DA (1.37±0.22
μg/kg QW) led to a significant rise of RBCs in week 3, 6 and 7 while Hb and Hct in week 6 and 7. Treatment with
equal doses of Eprex® (170.85±16.4 IU/kg and 238±25.9 IU/kg) induced only a mild increase in RBCs in week 7
and 6 respectively, while higher dose of Eprex® (413±40.8 IU/kg) elevated RBCs significantly at week 8 and Hct in
week 6 and 8. Administration of DA QW is more effective than Eprex® QTIW in terms of target anemia parameters:
RBCs, Hb and Hct during the first 8 weeks of administration.

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February 2020

Stability study of Valsartan in Aqueous Solutions: Effect of different pH, Time and Temperature

IJRPS 2019, 8(3), 01-15

International Journal of Research in Pharmacy and Science

Angiotensin II type1 receptor blockers are group of drugs binding to and blocking active site
of the receptor Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AngIItype1 R). According to current good
manufacturing practices, all drugs have been tested for their stability before release. In this study we
investigated the stability of valsartan in aqueous buffer solutions (μg/ml) at various pH in range of
pH 2-12 and at various temperatures from 4°C to 37°C with different time ranging from 0-96 h to
determine the optimum pH and temperature and time requirements for its stability and eventually
performance over various human gastrointestinal pH range. The stability study of valsartan was
determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-spectrophotometer.
Valsartan showed the highest stability after 2 hour sat pH 6.8 with different temperature. While
valsartan recovery rate remain stable at pH 12 all over the incubation times and temperatures using
HPLC. In contrast, recovery rate of valsartan was much lower at pH 2. In addition, incubation of
valsartan in different temperature with different time, a maximum decrease in the valsartan
concentrations was noticed. These results were confirmed by using spectrophotometric analysis.
Aqueous solution of valsartan (μg/ml) adjusted at pH 6.8 and 12 showed the highest maximum
stability at room temperature. In contrast pH 2 induced a higher decrease in valsartan concentration
with time.
The present study showed that highest recovery rate and stability were achieved at pH 6.8 and
12 in varies temperatures 4, 20 and 40°C with different time. While elevated hydrogen ion
concentrations (pH 2) and temperature with different time can significantly lower valsartan
concentrations.
In conclusion: The stability study revealed that the neutral and alkaline pH attenuate rate of valsartan
degradation suggested. Thus, keeping hydrogen ion concentrations at neutral or alkaline pH over
different time and temperature would be a very useful method to overcome the stability problems of
valsartan.

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February 2020

Weekly Assessment of Proteinuria After Renal Transplantation: A Possible Clinical Relevance

Vol. 3, No. 04; 2019

International Journal of Medical Science and Health Research

Aim of the study: Presence of protein in urine is negatively associated with kidney function. In order to evaluate the contribution of proteinuria from native kidney to post renal transplant urine protein content, we estimated protein urea before and weekly after kidney transplantation. The relation of proteinuria and serum biochemical parameters in clouding serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, cholesterol level and immunosuppressive drugs used is also investigated. Methods: Proteinuria was evaluated according to definition of >300 mg/24 hours. Patients were classified into three groups, group (A)< 300 mg/24hours. Group (B) 300-1000 mg/24hours and group (C)> 1 gm/24 hours. All Patients were treated with immune suppressive drugs; tacrolimus, my co phenol late mo fetil and prednisone. Anti-hypertensive drugs (ACEI and ARB) that might reduce protein urea were not used. We tested the association between level of protein urea and serum creatinine, fasting blood glucose, HBA1C and Cholesterol. Moreover, we also investigated the association with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and immunosuppressive drugs used. Results: A total of 68 renal transplants recipients were included in our study with mean age of 40.4 years and 57.4% were male. The prevalence of proteinuria in post renal transplant patients based on the average of recorded protein urea during first eight weeks, was27.9 % compared with98.3% in pre-transplant patients. Based on resolution of proteinuria in our study, in pre-transplant patients, group A was 1.6%, group B 25.8% while group C was 72.5%. However, in post-transplant patients, group A was 72%, group B23.5%, and group C 4.4%. Weekly assessment of protein urea for two months indicated significant amelioration in proteinuria level and a remarkable reduction in serum creatinine levels. The prevalence of protein urea during week 8 was (95.2%, 2.9%, and 1.4%) in group A, B and C, respectively. In addition, patients with non-detectable level increased to 82%. No correlation between fasting blood sugar, HBA1C, cholesterol land protein uria were observed. Conclusion: There was a dramatic decrease in proteinuria after renal transplantation. Moreover, a gradual decrease in renal proteinuria during first eight weeks was positively associated with remarkable melioration in kidney function.

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February 2020

Weekly therapeutic effectiveness of different doses of Eprex; Epoetin alfa® in the treatment of anemia of chronic kidney disease adult patients

Int J Res Pharm Sci 2016, 6(3); 17 – 24

International Journal of Research in Pharmacy and Science

Anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very common and its severity is usually proportional to the degree of renal insufficiency. The purpose of this study is to weekly evaluate the effectiveness of short acting erythrocyte stimulating agent; Eprex; Epoetin alfa® for managing anemia in CKD patients. Adult CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis at King Abdulaziz Medical City from December 2014-March 2015 who were treated for the first time with different doses of short acting erythrocyte stimulating agent; Eprex; Epoetin alfa®. The administration frequency of Eprex was 3 times/week, i.v. (QTIW) at doses 3000, 4000, 6000 and 40.000 IU QTIW. Data on several hematological parameters including red blood corpuscle indices, Mean corpuscular volume (MCV), Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), Red blood corpuscular (RBCs) count, hemoglobin (HB), Hematocrit (Hct), serum iron, ferritin and calculated T.SAT were collected prior to treatment (week 0) and at the end of every week for 7 weeks. Statistical comparisons between measured blood parameters over the follow up time were made using one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). A total of 50 were treated with Eprex; Epoetin alfa® (23 male and 27 female). Mean (SD) initial HB, RBCs and Hct for patients treated with Eprex; Epoetin alfa® was 82.38 (13.3) mg/dl, 2.88 (0.7) (×106/mm3) and 0.257 (0.05) (%, × 100), respectively. Treatment with Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 3000 IU QTIW induced a significant elevation in HB and Hct start from week 3 through week 7, while a marked increase in RBCs count in week 3,4, 6 and 7. A significant increase in MCV and MCH were noticed in week 7 and week 5 and 6 respectively. Administration of Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 4000 IU QTIW induced a remarkable increase in HB and Hct from week 5 through week 7 and from week 3 through week 7 respectively. While RBCs count were markedly elevated in week 7. MCV was elevated significantly in week 7 and MCHC was downloaded in week 6 and 7. However, Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 6000 IU QTIW did not significantly modified the investigated hematological parameter in the first 7 weeks. Treatment with the higher dose of Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 40.000 IU QTIW can markedly elevated both HB and Hct significantly during last three weeks and RBCs count last two weeks. No modification in MCV, MCH and MCHC were noticed This study revealed that Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 3000 start to enhance significantly hematological parameters earlier from week 3 while Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 4000 and 40.000 start from week 5 in HB and week 7 in RBCs. Our findings suggest that Eprex; Epoetin alfa® 3000 QTIW seems to be effective than other doses in terms of boosting blood indices (RBCs, HB, Hct). Further studies are highly warranted to evaluate the effect of Eprex;

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February 2020

Implementation ofanOutcome-BasedLongitudinalPharmacology Teaching inUndergraduateDentalCurriculum at KSAU-HSExperience

4(2018)115–126

Health ProfessionsEducation

Purpose/objectives: The aimofthisstudyistopresentamodification ofthestructureofthepharmacologyeducationalexperience
for dentalstudentsasaresultoftheearlyintroductionofapharmacologycourseintothepre-professionalcurriculum.
Methods: Three coursesofprofessionaldentalpharmacologyweremodified beforeand/orafterdeliverybydevelopinggeneral
course learningoutcomes,lecture-by-lecturelearningoutcomesandthememappingtoaligntopicstaughtwithinthesecoursesand
with thosetaughtinthepre-professionaldentalprogram.
Results: Final proposalsforthreeprofessionaldentalpharmacologycourses,whicharedistributedoverthreeprofessionalyears,
were preparedbasedonteachingexperienceandthememapping.Topicswereadded,deleted,transferredfromonecourseto
another toaffordcoursesthatarefullyaligned,relativelycomprehensive,longitudinal,withfocusontopicsrelevanttothedental
practice withoutredundancy.Inaddition,thedesignofthesecoursestookintoconsiderationthelevelofcoverageofthepre-
professional dentalpharmacologycourse.
Conclusions: This longitudinalinclusionofpharmacologycoursesformthesecondpre-professionalyeartothethirdprofessional
year isexpectedtoimprovedentalstudents’ pharmacology educationexperience.Althoughthelastofthesecoursesisa
pharmacotherapeutic course,morecourseswithclinicallyorientedtherapeuticapproacharerecommended.
& 2017 KingSaudbinAbdulAzizUniversityforHealthSciences

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February 2020

Inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway: A possible treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

Vol. 5(6), pp. 312-319, June 2013

International Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences

Alterations in ubiquitination and deubiquitination reactions have been directly implicated in the etiology
of many malignancies. In general, specific cancers can result from stabilization of oncoproteins or
destabilization of tumor suppressor genes. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) represent potential novel
anticancer therapy. These agents inhibit the degradation of multi-ubiquitinated target proteins, that is,
cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors that regulate cell
cycle progression. Following the successful application of Bortezomib as an effective treatment for
multiple myeloma (MM), a number of next-generation proteasome inhibitors have been developed with
the goals of improving efficacy, overcoming drug resistance, minimizing dose-limiting toxicity such as
peripheral neuropathy (PN), and improving convenience of administration. The recent accelerated
approval of carfilzomib exemplifies the success of this approach, with other four inhibitors currently
under study both preclinically and clinically. The role of PIs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been
demonstrated for the first time in 2004 that MG-132 induced apoptosis in human HCC cells through
caspase-dependent cleavage of β-catenin and inhibition of β-catenin-mediated trans-activation. In
addition, effect of Bortezomib on HCC was investigated and concluded that Bortezomib induced
apoptosis in HepG2 cells as a model of HCC by stimulating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic
pathways. Moreover, it has been shown that treatment with MG132 in combination with celecoxib
resulted in synergistic anti-proliferative rather than anti-inflammatory and proapoptotic effects against
liver cancer cells, providing a rational basis for the clinical use of this combination in the treatment of
liver cancer.

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February 2020

A possible antineoplastic potential of selective, irreversible proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib on chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

J Biochem Mol Toxicol 2014 Sep 27;28(9):400-6. Epub 2014 May 27.

Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, 11426, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbt.21577DOI Listing
September 2014
35 Reads
1.925 Impact Factor

Possible role of selective, irreversible, proteasome inhibitor (carfilzomib) in the treatment of rat hepatocellular carcinoma.

Chem Biol Interact 2014 May 13;215:17-24. Epub 2014 Mar 13.

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2014.03.001DOI Listing
May 2014
38 Reads
2.577 Impact Factor

Ginger ingredients inhibit the development of diethylnitrosoamine induced premalignant phenotype in rat chemical hepatocarcinogenesis model.

Biofactors 2010 Nov-Dec;36(6):483-90. Epub 2010 Sep 24.

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/biof.122DOI Listing
May 2011
5 Reads
4.592 Impact Factor

Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methylester ameliorates myocardial toxicity induced by doxorubicin.

J Biochem Mol Biol 2003 Nov;36(6):593-6

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5483/bmbrep.2003.36.6.593DOI Listing
November 2003
365 Reads

L-arginine ameliorates kidney function and urinary bladder sensitivity in experimentally-induced renal dysfunction in rats.

J Biochem Mol Biol 2003 Jul;36(4):373-8

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5483/bmbrep.2003.36.4.373DOI Listing
July 2003
7 Reads

Melatonin inhibits the contractile effect of vanadate in the isolated pulmonary arterial rings of rats: possible role of hydrogen peroxide.

J Biochem Mol Toxicol 2002 ;16(6):273-8

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jbt.10049
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbt.10049DOI Listing
June 2003
13 Reads
1.925 Impact Factor

Effects of volatile oil constituents of Nigella sativa on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice: evidence for antioxidant effects of thymoquinone.

Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol 2001 ;110(3-4):239-51

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, PO Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://faculty.ksu.edu.sa/73551/Papers/Current%20Papers/EFFE
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June 2003

Enhanced generation of leukotriene B4 from calcium ionophore-stimulated rat peritoneal inflammatory cells: a possible clinical relevance.

Curr Drug Targets Inflamm Allergy 2003 Mar;2(1):47-52

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1568010033344444DOI Listing
March 2003
6 Reads

Alpha-lipoic acid ameliorates myocardial toxicity induced by doxorubicin.

Pharmacol Res 2002 Dec;46(6):499-503

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1043661802002311DOI Listing
December 2002
7 Reads
4.408 Impact Factor

Protective effect of aminoguanidine against nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in normal rats.

Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol 2002 Jun;132(2):123-8

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1532-0456(02)00062-5DOI Listing
June 2002
5 Reads
2.301 Impact Factor

Enhanced generation of leukotriene B4 and superoxide radical from calcium ionophore (A23187) stimulated human neutrophils after priming with interferon-alpha.

Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol 1999 ;106(1-2):115-28

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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February 2001
4 Reads

Protective effect of thymoquinone against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats: a possible mechanism of protection.

Pharmacol Res 2000 Mar;41(3):283-9

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/phrs.1999.0585DOI Listing
March 2000
4.408 Impact Factor

Captopril ameliorates myocardial and hematological toxicities induced by adriamycin.

Biochem Mol Biol Int 1998 Jun;45(2):419-27

Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15216549800202802DOI Listing
June 1998

Captopril ameliorates myocardial and hematological toxicities induced by adriamycin.

Biochem Mol Biol Int. 1998 Jun;45(2):419-27.

Biochem Mol Biol Int. 1998 Jun;45(2):419-27.

  • Adriamycin has a wide spectrum of antitumor activity with dose related cardiotoxicity as a major side effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of captopril, a sulphydryl containing angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, on the cardio- and hematotoxicity of adriamycin in normal rats. A single dose of adriamycin (15 mg/kg) caused myocardial toxicity after 24 h manifested biochemically by elevation of serum enzymes:- Aspartate transaminase (AST, EC: 2.6.1.1), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC: 1.1.1.27), creatine phosphokinase (CPK, EC: 2.7.3.2) and the cardiac iso-enzymes of LDH and CPK. The hematotoxicity was characterized by severe leukopenia and anemia that appeared after 72 h of adriamycin administration. Captopril (60 mg/kg i.p.) 1 h before adriamycin injection ameliorated the biochemical toxicity induced by adriamycin. This was evidenced by a significant reduction in serum enzymes, after 24 and 48 h and a significant reduction of serum cardiac iso-enzymes after 48 h. Also restoration of the white blood cell counts as well as hemoglobin concentration occurred after 72 h of captopril administration. These results suggest that captopril may be benificial as a protective agent against cardio- and hematotoxicity induced by adriamycin.

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June 1998
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