Publications by authors named "Mahdi Aloosh"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dietary pattern and risk of multiple sclerosis.

Iran J Neurol 2012 ;11(2):47-53

Shefa Neuroscience Research Center, Tehran, Iran.

Background: It has been suggested that nutrition might play a role in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, dietary patterns associated with MS risk are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the dietary patterns of patients with MS and healthy controls to find the relationship between dietary patterns and MS.

Methods: Usual dietary intake of 75 women with relapsing/remitting MS (RRMS) and 75 healthy controls were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire consisting of 168 food items. To define major dietary patterns, we used factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between dietary patterns and risk of MS.

Results: Traditional pattern (high in low-fat dairy products, red meat, vegetable oil, onion, whole grain, soy, refined grains, organ meats, coffee, and legumes) was inversely related to the risk of MS [odds ratio (OR) = 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03-0.18; P = 0.028]. A similar inverse relationship was noted between MS risk and lacto-vegetarian (high in nuts, fruits, French fries, coffee, sweets and desserts, vegetables, and high-fat dairy products) and vegetarian (high in green leafy vegetables, hydrogenated fats, tomato, yellow vegetables, fruit juices, onion, and other vegetables) patterns (OR = 0.31; 95% CI: 0.12-0.82; P = 0.018 and OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19-0.90; P = 0.026, respectively). In contrast, the prevalence of MS was higher in those who had high animal fat dietary pattern (high in animal fats, potato, meat products, sugars, and hydrogenated fats and low in whole grains) (OR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.63-2.94; P < 0.005).

Conclusion: Our findings showed that the risk of RRMS can be affected by major dietary patterns.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3829243PMC
November 2013

Antigliadin antibody in sporadic adult ataxia.

Iran J Neurol 2012 ;11(1):16-20

Department of Radiology, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Background: The most common neurologic manifestation of gluten sensitivity is ataxia, which accounts for up to 40% of idiopathic sporadic ataxia. Timing of diagnosis of gluten ataxia is vital as it is one of the very few treatable causes of sporadic ataxia and causes irreversible loss of Purkinje cells. Antigliadin antibody (AGA) of the IgG type is the best marker for neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity. This study was conducted to measure the prevalence of gluten ataxia in a group of Iranian patients with idiopathic ataxia.

Methods: For 30 patients with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, a questionnaire about clinical and demographic data was completed. Serum AGA (IgA and IgG) and antiendomysial antibody (AEA) were assessed. Gluten ataxic patients underwent duodenal biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging was done for all patients to see if cerebellar atrophy is present.

Results: Only 2 patients had a positive IgG AGA (6.7%) who both had a positive AEA while none of them showed changes of celiac disease in their duodenal biopsies. Only presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and pursuit eye movement disorders were higher in patients with gluten ataxia.

Conclusion: Prevalence of gluten ataxia in Iranian patients with idiopathic ataxia seems to be lower than most of other regions. This could be explained by small sample size, differences in genetics and nutritional habits and also effect of serologic tests in clinical versus research setting. Further researches with larger sample size are recommended.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3829230PMC
November 2013