Publications by authors named "Magda F Morton"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

JNJ-26070109 [(R)4-bromo-N-[1-(2,4-difluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(quinoxaline-5-sulfonylamino)-benzamide]: a novel, potent, and selective cholecystokinin 2 receptor antagonist with good oral bioavailability.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2011 Jul 14;338(1):328-36. Epub 2011 Apr 14.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, LLC San Diego, California 92101, USA.

JNJ-26070109 [(R)4-bromo-N-[1-(2,4-difluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(quinoxaline-5-sulfonylamino)-benzamide] is a representative of a new chemical class of competitive antagonists of cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2) receptors. In this study, the primary in vitro pharmacology of JNJ-26070109 was evaluated along with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of this compound in rat and canine models of gastric acid secretion. JNJ-26070109 expressed high affinity for human (pK(I) = 8.49 ± 0.13), rat (pK(I) = 7.99 ± 0.08), and dog (pK(I) = 7.70 ± 0.14) CCK2 receptors. The selectivity of JNJ-26070109 at the CCK2 receptor versus the CCK1 receptor was species-dependent, with the greatest degree of selectivity (>1200-fold) measured at the human isoforms of the CCK1 receptor (selectivity at CCK2 versus CCK1 receptors: human, ∼1222-fold; rat, ∼324-fold; dog ∼336-fold). JNJ-26070109 behaved as a surmountable, competitive, antagonist of human CCK2 receptors in a calcium mobilization assay (pK(B) = 8.53 ± 0.05) and in pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the isolated, lumen-perfused, mouse stomach assay (pK(B) = 8.19 ± 0.13). The pharmacokinetic profile of this compound was determined in vivo in rats and dogs. JNJ-26070109 was shown to have high oral bioavailability (%F rat = 73 ± 16; %F dog = 92 ± 12) with half lives of 1.8 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.1 h in rat and dog, respectively. The pharmacodynamic properties of this compound were investigated using two in vivo models. In conscious rat and dog chronic gastric fistula models of pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion, JNJ-26070109 had oral EC(50) values of 1.5 and 0.26 μM, respectively. Overall, we have demonstrated that JNJ-26070109 is a high-affinity, selective CCK2 receptor antagonist with good pharmacokinetic properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.110.178483DOI Listing
July 2011

Anthranilic sulfonamide CCK1/CCK2 dual receptor antagonists II: tuning of receptor selectivity and in vivo efficacy.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2009 Nov 23;19(22):6376-8. Epub 2009 Sep 23.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

In the previous article we demonstrated how certain CCK2R-selective anthranilic amides could be structurally modified to afford high-affinity, selective CCK1R activity. We now describe our efforts at modulating and optimizing the CCK1R and CCK2R affinities aimed at producing compounds with good pharmacokinetics properties and in vivo efficacy in rat models of gastric acid and pancreatic amylase secretion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2009.09.065DOI Listing
November 2009

Anthranilic sulfonamide CCK1/CCK2 dual receptor antagonists I: discovery of CCKR1 selectivity in a previously CCKR2-selective lead series.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2009 Nov 23;19(22):6373-5. Epub 2009 Sep 23.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

A series of CCK2R-selective anthranilic amides is shown to derive CCK1R affinity via selective substitution of the amide side chain. Thus, extending the length of the original benzamide side chain by a single methylene unit imparts CCK1R affinity to the series, and further fine tuning of the affinity results in CCK1R selectivity of greater than 100-fold.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2009.09.064DOI Listing
November 2009

Characterization of a robust enzymatic assay for inhibitors of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent hydroxylases.

J Biomol Screen 2009 Jul 4;14(6):627-35. Epub 2009 Jun 4.

Department of Drug Discovery, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., San Diego, California, USA.

The prolyl-4-hydroxylase proteins regulate the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) by hydroxylation of proline residues targeting HIF-1alpha for proteasomal degradation. Using the purified catalytic domain of prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2(181-417)), an enzymatic assay has been developed to test inhibitors of the enzyme in vitro. Because PHD2 hydroxylates HIF-1alpha, with succinic acid produced as an end product, radiolabeled [5-(14)C]-2-oxoglutaric acid was used and formation of [14C]-succinic acid was measured to quantify PHD2(181-417) enzymatic activity. Comparison of the separation of 2-oxoglutaric acid and succinic acid by either ion exchange chromatography or precipitation with phenylhydrazine showed similar results, but the quantification and throughput were vastly increased using the latter method. The PHD2 reaction was substrate and concentration dependent. The addition of iron to the enzyme reaction mix resulted in an increase in enzymatic activity. The Km value for 2-oxoglutaric acid was determined to be 0.9 microM, and known PHD2 inhibitors were used to validate the assay. In addition, the authors demonstrate that this assay can be applied to other 2-oxoglutaric acid-dependent enzymes, including the asparaginyl hydroxylase, factor-inhibiting HIF-1alpha (FIH). A concentration-dependent increase in succinic acid production using recombinant FIH enzyme with a synthetic peptide substrate was observed. The authors conclude that a by-product enzyme assay measuring the conversion of 2-oxoglutaric acid to succinic acid using the catalytic domain of the human PHD2 provides a convenient method for the biochemical evaluation of inhibitors of the 2-oxoglutaric acid-dependent hydroxylases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087057109333976DOI Listing
July 2009

Discovery of potent cholecystokinin-2 receptor antagonists: elucidation of key pharmacophore elements by X-ray crystallographic and NMR conformational analysis.

Bioorg Med Chem 2008 Apr 5;16(7):3917-25. Epub 2008 Feb 5.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., Drug Discover, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

A novel series of cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK-2R) antagonists has been identified, as exemplified by anthranilic sulfonamide 1 (pK(i)=7.6). Pharmacokinetic and stability studies indicated that this series of compounds suffered from metabolic degradation, and that both the benzothiadiazole and piperidine rings were rapidly oxidized by liver enzymes. A combination of synthesis, computational methods, (1)H NMR conformational studies, and X-ray crystallographic analyses were applied to elucidate key pharmacophore elements, and to discover analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and high receptor binding affinity and selectivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2008.01.059DOI Listing
April 2008

Synthesis and solid-phase purification of anthranilic sulfonamides as CCK-2 ligands.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2007 Dec 29;17(24):6905-9. Epub 2007 Sep 29.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

A novel strategy for the synthesis of cholecystokinin-2 receptor ligands was developed. The route employs a solution-phase synthesis of a series of anthranilic sulfonamides followed by a resin capture purification strategy to produce multi-milligram quantities of compounds for bioassay. The synthesis was used to produce >100 compounds containing various functional groups, highlighting the general applicability of this strategy and to address specific metabolism issues in our CCK-2 program.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2007.09.087DOI Listing
December 2007

3-[5-(3,4-Dichloro-phenyl)-1-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-m-tolyl-propionate (JNJ-17156516), a novel, potent, and selective cholecystokinin 1 receptor antagonist: in vitro and in vivo pharmacological comparison with dexloxiglumide.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2007 Nov 7;323(2):562-9. Epub 2007 Aug 7.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., San Diego, California 92121, USA.

3-[5-(3,4-Dichloro-phenyl)-1-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-m-tolyl-propionate (JNJ-17156516) is a novel, potent, and selective cholecystokinin (CCK)1-receptor antagonist. In this study, the pharmacology of JNJ-17156516 was investigated both in vitro and in vivo, and the pharmacokinetic profile was evaluated in rats. JNJ-17156516 expressed high-affinity at the cloned human (pK(I) = 7.96 +/- 0.11), rat (pK(I) = 8.02 +/- 0.11), and canine (pK(I) = 7.98 +/- 0.04) CCK1 receptors, and it was also highly selective for the CCK1 receptor compared with the CCK2 receptor across the same species ( approximately 160-, approximately 230-, and approximately 75-fold, respectively). The high affinity of JNJ-17156516 at CCK1 receptors in vitro was confirmed in radioligand binding studies on fresh human gallbladder tissue (pK(I) = 8.22 +/- 0.05). In a functional in vitro assay of guinea pig gallbladder contraction, JNJ-17156516 behaved as a competitive antagonist, with a pK(B) value of 8.00 +/- 0.07. In vivo, JNJ-17156516 produced a parallel, rightward shift in the CCK-8S-evoked contraction of the guinea pig gallbladder. The dose required to shift the CCK-8S dose-response curve was 240 nmol kg(-1) i.v. In the anesthetized rat, JNJ-17156516 produced a dose-related decrease in the number of duodenal contractions evoked by infusion of CCK-8S, with an ED(50) = 484 nmol kg(-1). Pharmacokinetic analysis of JNJ-17156516 in rats, revealed that JNJ-17156516 had a half-life of 3.0 +/- 0.5 h and a very high bioavailability (108 +/- 10%) in this species. Overall, we have demonstrated that JNJ-17156516 is a high-affinity selective human CCK1 receptor antagonist with good pharmacokinetic properties in rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.107.124578DOI Listing
November 2007

Obestatin reduces food intake and suppresses body weight gain in rodents.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2007 May 30;357(1):264-9. Epub 2007 Mar 30.

Internal Medicine, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Obestatin was recently described as a bioactive peptide encoded for by the same gene as ghrelin but with opposite actions on food intake. Although some groups have confirmed these findings others find no effect. We investigated the effect of obestatin on feeding in rodents over a wide range of doses. Acute administration of obestatin inhibited feeding at doses of 10-100 nmol/kg i.p. in mice and 100-300 nmol/kg i.p. in lean and Zucker fatty rats. Interestingly, the dose-response relationship was U-shaped such that both low and high doses were without effect in either species. Treatment of mice with obestatin over a 7-day period decreased body weight gain and food consumption. Overall, obestatin suppressed food intake and body weight gain in rodent and an unusual dose-response relationship was found. These findings may explain the difficulties in reproducing the effects of obestatin on feeding reported by some groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.138DOI Listing
May 2007

Neuromedin U stimulates contraction of human long saphenous vein and gastrointestinal smooth muscle in vitro.

Regul Pept 2006 Sep 19;136(1-3):109-16. Epub 2006 Jun 19.

Department of Surgery, Royal Free and University College Medical School, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, London W1T 3AA, UK.

The neuropeptide Neuromedin U (NMU) stimulates smooth muscle contraction, and modulates local blood flow and adrenocortical function via two endogenous receptors, NMU1 and NMU2. Although its amino-acid sequence is highly conserved across species, the physiological effects of NMU are variable between species and little is known of its effects on human tissues. We have examined the contractile effects of NMU-25 on human smooth muscles of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (ascending colon, gallbladder) and long saphenous vein (LSV) using in vitro organ bath bioassays. From LSV, ileum, gallbladder, caecum and colon, NMU receptor transcripts were amplified by RT-PCR and expression levels were determined by semi-quantitative scanning densitometry. NMU-25 produced a concentration-dependent, sustained contraction of isolated smooth muscle (p[A](50)+/-s.e.m., ascending colon, 8.93+/-0.18; gallbladder, 7.01+/-0.15; LSV, 8.67+/-0.09). NMU1 and NMU2 receptor transcription was detected in all tissues; transcription of both receptors was similar in gallbladder, but NMU1 receptor transcription was predominant in the sigmoid colon and LSV. In summary, these studies indicate that NMU may control tone in the human GI tract and LSV through an action on smooth muscle. Development of NMU receptor subtype-selective ligands will aid the further elucidation of the physiological roles of NMU and its two receptors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regpep.2006.05.003DOI Listing
September 2006

Species-dependent smooth muscle contraction to Neuromedin U and determination of the receptor subtypes mediating contraction using NMU1 receptor knockout mice.

Br J Pharmacol 2006 Apr;147(8):886-96

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

The peptide ligand neuromedin U (NMU) has been implicated in an array of biological activities, including contraction of uterine, intestinal and urinary bladder smooth muscle. However, many of these responses appear to be species-specific. This study was undertaken to fully elucidate the range of smooth muscle-stimulating effects of NMU in rats, mice and guinea-pigs, and to examine the extent of the species differences. In addition, the NMU1 receptor knockout mouse was used to determine which receptor subtype mediates the contractile responses generated by NMU in the mouse. A range of isolated organ in vitro bioassays were carried out, which were chosen to re-confirm previous literature reports (uterine and stomach fundus contraction) and also to explore potentially novel smooth muscle responses to NMU. This investigation uncovered a number of previously unidentified NMU-mediated responses: contraction of rat lower esophageal sphinster (LES), rat ileum, mouse gallbladder, enhancement of electrically evoked contractions in rat and mouse vas deferens, and a considerable degree of cross-species differences. Studies using the NMU1 receptor knockout mice revealed that in the mouse fundus and gallbladder assays the NMU contractile response was mediated entirely through the NMU1 receptor subtype, whereas, in assays of mouse uterus and vas deferens, the response to NMU was unchanged in the NMU1 receptor knockout mouse, suggesting that the NMU response may be mediated through the NMU2 receptor subtype. NMU receptor subtype-selective antagonists are required to further elucidate the role of the individual receptor subtypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjp.0706677DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1760708PMC
April 2006

Pharmacological analysis of CCK2 receptors up-regulated using engineered transcription factors.

Regul Pept 2005 Jul;129(1-3):227-32

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, LLC., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA.

Designed zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) regulate expression of target genes when coupled to activator or repressor domains. Transfection of ZFPs into cell lines can create expression systems where the targeted endogenous gene is transcribed and the protein of interest can be investigated in its own cellular context. Here we describe the pharmacological investigation of an expression system generated using CCK2 receptor-selective ZFPs transfected into human embryonic kidney cells (HEKZFP system). The receptors expressed in this system, in response to ZFP expression, were functional in calcium mobilization studies and the potency of the agonists investigated was consistent with their action at CCK2 receptors (CCK-8S pA50 = 9.05+/-0.11, pentagastrin pA50 = 9.11+/-0.13). In addition, binding studies were conducted using [125I]-BH-CCK-8S as radioligand. The saturation binding analysis of this radioligand was consistent with a single population of high affinity CCK receptors (pK(D) = 10.24). Competition studies were also conducted using a number of previously well-characterized CCK-receptor selective ligands; JB93182, YF476, PD-134,308, SR27897, dexloxiglumide, L-365,260 and L-364,718. Overall, the estimated affinity values for these ligands were consistent with their interaction at CCK2 receptors. Therefore, CCK2 receptors up-regulated using zinc finger protein technology can provide an alternative to standard transfection techniques for the pharmacological analysis of compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regpep.2005.02.013DOI Listing
July 2005

Cell lines for drug discovery: elevating target-protein levels using engineered transcription factors.

J Biomol Screen 2004 Feb;9(1):44-51

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., Point Richmond Technology Center, Richmond, CA 94804, USA.

Drug discovery requires high-quality, high-throughput bioassays for lead identification and optimization. These assays are usually based on immortalized cell lines, which express the selected drug target either naturally or as a consequence of transfection with the cDNA encoding the target. Natural untransfected cell lines often fail to achieve the levels of expression required to provide assays of sufficient quality with a high enough signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, the use of cDNA is increasingly restricted, as the sequences for more and more genes become subject to patent restrictions. To overcome these limitations, the authors demonstrate that engineered transcription factors with Cys2-His2 zinc finger DNA-binding domains can be used to effectively activate an endogenous gene of interest without the use of isolated cDNA of the target gene. Using this approach, the authors have generated a cell line that provides a high-quality and pharmacologically validated G-protein-coupled receptor bioassay. In principle, this technology is applicable to any gene of pharmaceutical importance in any cell type.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087057103260115DOI Listing
February 2004