Publications by authors named "Mae Chappe"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rational design and synthesis of affinity matrices based on proteases immobilized onto cellulose membranes.

Prep Biochem Biotechnol 2017 Sep 12;47(8):745-753. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

c Department of Biocatalysis , Institute for Catalysis, Higher Council for Scientific Research, Campus Cantoblanco , Madrid , Spain.

Discovery of new protease inhibitors may result in potential therapeutic agents or useful biotechnological tools. Obtainment of these molecules from natural sources requires simple, economic, and highly efficient purification protocols. The aim of this work was the obtainment of affinity matrices by the covalent immobilization of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) and papain onto cellulose membranes, previously activated with formyl (FCM) or glyoxyl groups (GCM). GCM showed the highest activation grade (10.2 µmol aldehyde/cm). We implemented our strategy for the rational design of immobilized derivatives (RDID) to optimize the immobilization. pH 9.0 was the optimum for the immobilization through the terminal α-NH, configuration predicted as catalytically competent. However, our data suggest that protein immobilization may occur via clusters of few reactive groups. DPP-IV-GCM showed the highest maximal immobilized protein load (2.1 µg/cm), immobilization percentage (91%), and probability of multipoint covalent attachment. The four enzyme-support systems were able to bind at least 80% of the reversible competitive inhibitors bacitracin/cystatin, compared with the available active sites in the immobilized derivatives. Our results show the potentialities of the synthesized matrices for affinity purification of protease inhibitors and confirm the robustness of the RDID strategy to optimize protein immobilization processes with further practical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826068.2017.1315600DOI Listing
September 2017

FOXE1 Polymorphism Interacts with Dietary Iodine Intake in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Risk in the Cuban Population.

Thyroid 2016 12 27;26(12):1752-1760. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

1 Cancer and Radiations, Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) - U1018, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Villejuif, France .

Background: The incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is low in Cuba, and the contribution of dietary factors to DTC in this population has not been investigated so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between dietary iodine intake and DTC with regard to the interaction with environmental factors or some common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on a case-control study carried out in Cuba.

Methods: A total of 203 cases and 212 controls from the general population were interviewed face-to-face using the dietary intake questionnaire and the photo booklet from the E3N cohort. A specific food composition table was constructed for this study. For each parameter studied, the odds ratio (OR) was stratified on age group and sex, and further adjusted for dietary energy, smoking status, ethnic group, level of education, number of pregnancies, and body surface area.

Results: The risk of DTC was significantly reduced with increasing consumption of fish (p = 0.04), but no association between total dietary iodine intake and DTC risk was evident (p = 0.7). This lack of significant association was true whatever the age, the smoking status, the dietary selenium intake, and the ethnicity (p > 0.05). DTC risk was positively and strongly associated with the number of copies in the minor allele (A) for SNP rs965513 near FOXE1 among people who consumed less iodine than the median (p = 0.005).

Conclusion: Overall, the majority of the studied population had an optimal dietary iodine intake. DTC risk was inversely associated with high fish consumption. Furthermore, DTC risk was positively associated with the number of copies in the minor allele (A) of rs965513 among people who consumed less iodine than the median. Because these findings are based on post-diagnostic measures, studies with pre-diagnostic dietary iodine are needed for confirmation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/thy.2015.0594DOI Listing
December 2016

Recreational Physical Activity and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis of Two Case-Control Studies.

Eur Thyroid J 2016 Jul 21;5(2):132-8. Epub 2016 May 21.

U1018, Centre d'Epidémiologie et de Santé des Populations (CESP), Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France.

Purpose: Physical activity has been hypothesized to influence cancer occurrence through several mechanisms. To date, its relation with thyroid cancer risk has been examined in relatively few studies. We pooled 2 case-control studies conducted in Cuba and Eastern France to assess the relationship between self-reported practice of recreational physical activity since childhood and thyroid cancer risk.

Methods: This pooled study included 1,008 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) matched with 1,088 controls (age range 9-35 and 17-60 years in the French and Cuban studies, respectively). Risk factors associated with the practice of recreational physical activity were estimated using OR and 95% CI. Logistic regressions were stratified by age class, country, and gender and were adjusted for ethnic group, level of education, number of pregnancies for women, height, BMI, and smoking status.

Results: Overall, the risk of thyroid cancer was slightly reduced among subjects who reported recreational physical activity (OR = 0.8; 95% CI 0.5-1.0). The weekly frequency (i.e. h/week) seems to be more relevant than the duration (years).

Conclusion: Long-term recreational physical activity, practiced since childhood, may reduce the DTC risk. However, the mechanisms whereby the DTC risk decreases are not yet entirely clear.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000445887DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4949366PMC
July 2016

Thyroid volume and its relation to anthropometric measures in a healthy cuban population.

Eur Thyroid J 2015 Mar 26;4(1):55-61. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Radiation Epidemiology Group, Unit 1018-Inserm, Villejuif, France ; The Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Villejuif, France ; Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the thyroid volume in healthy adults by ultrasound and to correlate this volume with some anthropometric measures and other differentiated thyroid cancer risk factors.

Study Design: Thyroid volume and anthropometric measures were recorded in a sample of 100 healthy adults, including 21 men and 79 women aged 18-50 years, living in a non-iodine-deficient area of Havana city.

Results: The average thyroid volume was 6.6 ± 0.26 ml; it was higher in men (7.3 ml) than in women (6.4 ml; p = 0.15). In the univariate analysis, thyroid volume was correlated with all anthropometric measures, but in the multivariate analysis, body surface area was found to be the only significant anthropometric parameter. Thyroid volume was also higher in current or former smokers and in persons with blood group AB or B.

Conclusion: Specific reference values of thyroid volume as a function of body surface area could be used for evaluating thyroid volume in clinical practice. The relation between body surface area and thyroid volume is coherent with what is known about the relation of thyroid volume to thyroid cancer risk, but the same is not true about the relation between thyroid volume and smoking habit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371346DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4404892PMC
March 2015

Common variants at the 9q22.33, 14q13.3 and ATM loci, and risk of differentiated thyroid cancer in the Cuban population.

BMC Genet 2015 Mar 1;16:22. Epub 2015 Mar 1.

The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm), Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Radiation Epidemiology Group, Villejuif, 94805, France.

Background: The incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in Cuba is low and the contribution of host genetic factors to DTC in this population has not been investigated so far. Our goal was to assess the role of known risk polymorphisms in DTC cases living in Havana. We genotyped five polymorphisms located at the DTC susceptibility loci on chromosome 14q13.3 near NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1), on chromosome 9q22.33 near Forkhead factor E1 (FOXE1) and within the DNA repair gene Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) in 203 cases and 212 age- and sex- matched controls. Potential interactions between these polymorphisms and other DTC risk factors such as body surface area, body mass index, size, ethnicity, and, for women, the parity were also examined.

Results: Significant association with DTC risk was found for rs944289 near NKX2-1 (OR per A allele = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.1), and three polymorphisms near or within FOXE1, namely rs965513 (OR per A allele = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.3), rs1867277 in the promoter region of the gene (OR per A allele = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9) and the poly-alanine tract expansion polymorphism rs71369530 (OR per Long Allele = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.3-2.5), only the 2 latter remaining significant when correcting for multiple tests. Overall, no association between DTC and the coding SNP D1853N (rs1801516) in ATM (OR per A Allele = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.7-1.7) was seen. Nevertheless women who had 2 or more pregnancies had a 3.5-fold increase in risk of DTC if they carried the A allele (OR 3.5, 95% CI: 3.2-9.8) as compared to 0.8 (OR 0.8, 95% CI: 0.4-1.6) in those who had fewer than 2.

Conclusions: We confirmed in the Cuban population the role of the loci previously associated with DTC susceptibility in European and Japanese populations through genome-wide association studies. Our results on ATM and the number of pregnancies raise interesting questions on the mechanisms by which oestrogens, or other hormones, alter the DNA damage response and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins such as ATM. Due to the small size of our study and to multiple tests, all these results warrant further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12863-015-0180-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4354996PMC
March 2015

Environmental, lifestyle, and anthropometric risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancer in cuba: a case-control study.

Eur Thyroid J 2014 Sep 28;3(3):189-96. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

Radiation Epidemiology Group, 1018 INSERM Unit, Villejuif, France ; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France ; University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France.

Background: The incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is low in people of African origin and higher in populations living on islands, but there is no well-established explanation for these differences. Cuba is a multiethnic nation with people of African and Spanish descent. Until now, no study on the risk factors of DTC has focused on the Cuban population. Our aim is to establish the role of environmental and lifestyle factors and to relate anthropometric measurements to the risk of developing DTC in Cuba.

Methods: We performed a case-control study of 203 DTC patients treated in two hospitals in Havana and 212 controls living in the area covered by these hospitals (i.e. parts of Havana and the municipality of Jaruco). Risk factors were analyzed using conditional logistic regression.

Results: As has been shown by other studies, we found that non-African ethnicity, never smoking, parity, and high body mass index are risk factors significantly associated with DTC, whereas a history of exposure to ionizing radiation and level of education were not significantly related with disease development. Being rhesus factor-positive, having a personal history of benign thyroid disorder, agricultural occupation, and consumption of artesian well water were also associated with a significantly increased risk of developing DTC.

Conclusions: The original findings reported here concern the risk of DTC that was associated with non-African ethnicity, positive rhesus factor, farming, and drinking water from an artesian well.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000362928DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4224259PMC
September 2014

Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound form of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

J Biosci 2013 Sep;38(3):461-9

Centro de Estudios de Proteinas (CEP), Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de la Habana, Calle 25 No. 455, Vedado, La Habana 10400, Cuba.

Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is an ectopeptidase with many roles, and a target of therapies for different pathologies. Zinc and calcium produce mixed inhibition of porcine DPP-IV activity. To investigate whether these results may be generalized to mammalian DPP-IV orthologues, we purified the intact membrane-bound form from rat kidney. Rat DPP-IV hydrolysed Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide with an average Vmax of 0.86 +/- 0.01 meu mol min-1mL-1 and KM of 76 +/- 6 meu M. The enzyme was inhibited by the DPP-IV family inhibitor L-threo-Ile-thiazolidide (Ki=64.0 +/- 0.53 nM), competitively inhibited by bacitracin (Ki=0.16 +/- 0.01 mM) and bestatin (Ki=0.23 +/- 0.02 mM), and irreversibly inhibited by TLCK (IC50 value of 1.20 +/- 0.11 mM). The enzyme was also inhibited by divalent ions like Zn2+ and Ca2+, for which a mixed inhibition mechanism was observed (Ki values of the competitive component: 0.15 +/- 0.01 mM and 50.0 +/- 1.05 mM, respectively). According to bioinformatic tools, Ca2+ ions preferentially bound to the beta-propeller domain of the rat and human enzymes, while Zn2+ ions to the alpha-beta hydrolase domain; the binding sites were essentially the same that were previously reported for the porcine DPP-IV. These data suggest that the cationic susceptibility of mammalian DPP-IV orthologues involves conserved mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12038-013-9333-8DOI Listing
September 2013

Effect of divalent cations on the porcine kidney cortex membrane-bound form of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

Int J Biochem Cell Biol 2011 Mar 17;43(3):363-71. Epub 2010 Nov 17.

Centro de Estudios de Proteínas, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de la Habana, Calle 25 No. 455, Vedado, La Habana 10400, Cuba.

Dipeptidyl peptidase IV is an ectopeptidase with multiple physiological roles including the degradation of incretins, and a target of therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Divalent cations can inhibit its activity, but there has been little effort to understand how they act. The intact membrane-bound form of porcine kidney dipeptidyl peptidase IV was purified by a simple and fast procedure. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide with an average V(max) of 1.397±0.003 μmol min(-1) mL(-1), k(cat) of 145.0±1.2 s(-1), K(M) of 0.138±0.005 mM and k(cat)/K(M) of 1050 mM(-1) s(-1). The enzyme was inhibited by bacitracin, tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, and by the dipeptidyl peptidase IV family inhibitor L-threo-Ile-thiazolidide (K(i) 70 nM). The enzyme was inhibited by the divalent ions Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Zn(2+), following kinetic mechanisms of mixed inhibition, with K(i) values of 2.04×10(-1), 2.28×10(-2), 4.21×10(-4), 8.00×10(-5) and 2.95×10(-5) M, respectively. According to bioinformatic tools, Ca(2+) ions preferentially bound to the β-propeller domain of the porcine enzyme, while Zn(2+) ions to the α-β hydrolase domain; the binding sites were strikingly conserved in the human enzyme and other homologues. The functional characterization indicates that porcine and human homologues have very similar functional properties. Knowledge about the mechanisms of action of divalent cations may facilitate the design of new inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2010.11.006DOI Listing
March 2011