Publications by authors named "Madison S Strine"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Stability of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in Nonsupplemented Saliva.

Emerg Infect Dis 2021 04;27(4):1146-1150

The expense of saliva collection devices designed to stabilize severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA is prohibitive to mass testing. However, virus RNA in nonsupplemented saliva is stable for extended periods and at elevated temperatures. Simple plastic tubes for saliva collection will make large-scale testing and continued surveillance easier.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2704.204199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8007305PMC
April 2021

Comprehensive in vivo secondary structure of the SARS-CoV-2 genome reveals novel regulatory motifs and mechanisms.

Mol Cell 2021 02 1;81(3):584-598.e5. Epub 2021 Jan 1.

Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Department of Chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Electronic address:

Severe-acute-respiratory-syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the positive-sense RNA virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The genome of SARS-CoV-2 is unique among viral RNAs in its vast potential to form RNA structures, yet as much as 97% of its 30 kilobases have not been structurally explored. Here, we apply a novel long amplicon strategy to determine the secondary structure of the SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome at single-nucleotide resolution in infected cells. Our in-depth structural analysis reveals networks of well-folded RNA structures throughout Orf1ab and reveals aspects of SARS-CoV-2 genome architecture that distinguish it from other RNA viruses. Evolutionary analysis shows that several features of the SARS-CoV-2 genomic structure are conserved across β-coronaviruses, and we pinpoint regions of well-folded RNA structure that merit downstream functional analysis. The native, secondary structure of SARS-CoV-2 presented here is a roadmap that will facilitate focused studies on the viral life cycle, facilitate primer design, and guide the identification of RNA drug targets against COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2020.12.041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7775661PMC
February 2021

CD300lf Conditional Knockout Mouse Reveals Strain-Specific Cellular Tropism of Murine Norovirus.

J Virol 2021 01 13;95(3). Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Noroviruses are a leading cause of gastrointestinal infection in humans and mice. Understanding human norovirus (HuNoV) cell tropism has important implications for our understanding of viral pathogenesis. Murine norovirus (MNoV) is extensively used as a surrogate model for HuNoV. We previously identified CD300lf as the receptor for MNoV. Here, we generated a conditional knockout ( ) mouse to elucidate the cell tropism of persistent and nonpersistent strains of murine norovirus. Using this mouse model, we demonstrated that CD300lf expression on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), and on tuft cells in particular, is essential for transmission of the persistent MNoV strain CR6 (MNoV) In contrast, the nonpersistent MNoV strain CW3 (MNoV) does not require CD300lf expression on IECs for infection. However, deletion of CD300lf in myelomonocytic cells (+) partially reduces CW3 viral load in lymphoid and intestinal tissues. Disruption of CD300lf expression on B cells (), neutrophils (), and dendritic cells () did not affect MNoV viral RNA levels. Finally, we show that the transcription factor STAT1, which is critical for the innate immune response, partially restricts the cell tropism of MNoV to LysM+ cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD300lf expression on tuft cells is essential for MNoV; that myelomonocytic cells are a major, but not exclusive, target cell of MNoV; and that STAT1 signaling restricts the cellular tropism of MNoV This study provides the first genetic system for studying the cell type-specific role of CD300lf in norovirus pathogenesis. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of gastroenteritis resulting in up to 200,000 deaths each year. The receptor and cell tropism of HuNoV in immunocompetent humans are unclear. We use murine norovirus (MNoV) as a model for HuNoV. We recently identified CD300lf as the sole physiologic receptor for MNoV. Here, we leverage this finding to generate a conditional knockout mouse to decipher the contributions of specific cell types to MNoV infection. We demonstrate that persistent MNoV requires CD300lf expression on tuft cells. In contrast, multiple CD300lf+ cell types, dominated by myelomonocytic cells, are sufficient for nonpersistent MNoV infection. CD300lf expression on epithelial cells, B cells, neutrophils, and dendritic cells is not critical for MNoV infection. Mortality associated with the MNoV strain in mice does not require CD300lf expression on LysM+ cells, highlighting that both CD300lf receptor expression and innate immunity regulate MNoV cell tropism .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01652-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7925115PMC
January 2021

Genome-wide CRISPR Screens Reveal Host Factors Critical for SARS-CoV-2 Infection.

Cell 2021 01 20;184(1):76-91.e13. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Immunobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address:

Identification of host genes essential for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection may reveal novel therapeutic targets and inform our understanding of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pathogenesis. Here we performed genome-wide CRISPR screens in Vero-E6 cells with SARS-CoV-2, Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), bat CoV HKU5 expressing the SARS-CoV-1 spike, and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike. We identified known SARS-CoV-2 host factors, including the receptor ACE2 and protease Cathepsin L. We additionally discovered pro-viral genes and pathways, including HMGB1 and the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, that are SARS lineage and pan-coronavirus specific, respectively. We show that HMGB1 regulates ACE2 expression and is critical for entry of SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and NL63. We also show that small-molecule antagonists of identified gene products inhibited SARS-CoV-2 infection in monkey and human cells, demonstrating the conserved role of these genetic hits across species. This identifies potential therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2 and reveals SARS lineage-specific and pan-CoV host factors that regulate susceptibility to highly pathogenic CoVs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.10.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7574718PMC
January 2021

Genome-wide CRISPR screen reveals host genes that regulate SARS-CoV-2 infection.

bioRxiv 2020 Jun 17. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Identification of host genes essential for SARS-CoV-2 infection may reveal novel therapeutic targets and inform our understanding of COVID-19 pathogenesis. Here we performed a genome-wide CRISPR screen with SARS-CoV-2 and identified known SARS-CoV-2 host factors including the receptor ACE2 and protease Cathepsin L. We additionally discovered novel pro-viral genes and pathways including the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and key components of the TGF-β signaling pathway. Small molecule inhibitors of these pathways prevented SARS-CoV-2-induced cell death. We also revealed that the alarmin HMGB1 is critical for SARS-CoV-2 replication. In contrast, loss of the histone H3.3 chaperone complex sensitized cells to virus-induced death. Together this study reveals potential therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2 and highlights host genes that may regulate COVID-19 pathogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.16.155101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7457610PMC
June 2020

Simply saliva: stability of SARS-CoV-2 detection negates the need for expensive collection devices.

medRxiv 2020 Aug 4. Epub 2020 Aug 4.

Most currently approved strategies for the collection of saliva for COVID-19 diagnostics require specialized tubes containing buffers promoted for the stabilization of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and virus inactivation. Yet many of these are expensive, in limited supply, and not necessarily validated specifically for viral RNA. While saliva is a promising sample type as it can be reliably self-collected for the sensitive detection of SARS-CoV-2, the expense and availability of these collection tubes are prohibitive to mass testing efforts. Therefore, we investigated the stability of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and infectious virus detection from saliva without supplementation. We tested RNA stability over extended periods of time (2-25 days) and at temperatures representing at-home storage and elevated temperatures which might be experienced when cold chain transport may be unavailable. We found SARS-CoV-2 RNA in saliva from infected individuals is stable at 4°C, room temperature (~19°C), and 30°C for prolonged periods and found limited evidence for viral replication in saliva. This work demonstrates that expensive saliva collection options involving RNA stabilization and virus inactivation buffers are not always needed, permitting the use of cheaper collection options. Affordable testing methods are urgently needed to meet current testing demands and for continued surveillance in reopening strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.03.20165233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7418742PMC
August 2020

CD300lf is the primary physiologic receptor of murine norovirus but not human norovirus.

PLoS Pathog 2020 04 6;16(4):e1008242. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

Murine norovirus (MNoV) is an important model of human norovirus (HNoV) and mucosal virus infection more broadly. Viral receptor utilization is a major determinant of cell tropism, host range, and pathogenesis. The bona fide receptor for HNoV is unknown. Recently, we identified CD300lf as a proteinaceous receptor for MNoV. Interestingly, its paralogue CD300ld was also sufficient for MNoV infection in vitro. Here we explored whether CD300lf is the sole physiologic receptor in vivo and whether HNoV can use a CD300 ortholog as an entry receptor. We report that both CD300ld and CD300lf are sufficient for infection by diverse MNoV strains in vitro. We further demonstrate that CD300lf is essential for both oral and parenteral MNoV infection and to elicit anti-MNoV humoral responses in vivo. In mice deficient in STAT1 signaling, CD300lf is required for MNoV-induced lethality. Finally, we demonstrate that human CD300lf (huCD300lf) is not essential for HNoV infection, nor does huCD300lf inhibit binding of HNoV virus-like particles to glycans. Thus, we report huCD300lf is not a receptor for HNoV.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1008242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7162533PMC
April 2020