Publications by authors named "Madhusmita Mohapatra"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Responses of phytoplankton community structure and association to variability in environmental drivers in a tropical coastal lagoon.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Apr 1;783:146873. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon 752030, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

Spatial and seasonal heterogeneity in phytoplankton communities are governed by many biotic and abiotic drivers. However, the identification of long-term spatial and temporal trends in abiotic drivers, and their interdependencies with the phytoplankton communities' structure is understudied in tropical brackish coastal lagoons. We examined phytoplankton communities' spatiotemporal dynamics from a 5-year dataset (n = 780) collected from 13 sampling stations in Chilika Lagoon, India, where the salinity gradient defined the spatial patterns in environmental variables. Generalized additive models showed a declining trend in phytoplankton biomass, pH, and dissolved PO in the lagoon. Hierarchical modelling of species communities revealed that salinity (44.48 ± 28.19%), water temperature (4.37 ± 5.65%), and season (4.27 ± 0.96%) accounted for maximum variation in the phytoplankton composition. Bacillariophyta (Indicator Value (IV): 0.74) and Dinophyta (IV: 0.72) emerged as top indicators for polyhaline regime whereas, Cyanophyta (IV: 0.81), Euglenophyta (IV: 0.79), and Chlorophyta (IV: 0.75) were strong indicators for oligohaline regime. The responses of Dinophyta and Chrysophyta to environmental drivers were much more complex as random effects accounted for ~70-75% variation in their abundances. Prorocentrum minimum (IV: 0.52), Gonyaulax sp. (IV: 0.52), and Alexandrium sp. (IV: 0.51) were potential indicators of P-limitation. Diploneis weissflogii (IV: 0.43), a marine diatom, emerged as a potential indicator of N-limitation. Hierarchical modelling revealed the positive association between Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta whereas, Dinophyta and Chrysophyta showed a negative association with Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta. Landsat 8-Operational Land Imager satellite models predicted the highest and lowest Cyanophyta abundances in northern and southern sectors, respectively, which were in accordance with the near-coincident field-based measurements from the lagoon. This study highlighted the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and their relationships with environmental drivers by separating the signals of habitat filtering and biotic interactions in a monsoon-regulated tropical coastal lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146873DOI Listing
April 2021

Streptomyces pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult - a rare isolate.

Adv Respir Med 2021 20;89(1):68-71. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Jawaharlal Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Dhanvantri Nagar, Gorimedu, Puducherry, India.

Streptomyces belongs to the Actinomycetes group of bacteria which are gram-positive non acid-fast bacilli, widely recognised for their potential to produce antimicrobials active against bacterial, mycobacterial, parasitic and fungal infections. They commonly cause cutaneous infections following traumatic inoculation. Visceral infections are relatively rare and limited to immunocompro-mised hosts. We describe a case of Streptomyces pneumonia in a healthy immunocompetent female, who when investigated for voluntary kidney donation, resulted in the isolation of Streptomyces species from bronchial wash cultures. Streptomyces, a potential pathogen in immunocompetent hosts is frequently underdiagnosed. Once isolated, both physicians and microbiologists should pay attention to differentiate true infection from contamination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/ARM.a2020.0171DOI Listing
January 2021

with pathological intercostal lung herniation.

Indian J Med Res 2020 09;152(3):320-321

Department of Plastic Surgery, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, Puducherry 605 006, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_747_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7881823PMC
September 2020

Seasonal and spatial dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in a brackish water coastal lagoon.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Feb 5;705:134729. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon, Odisha 752030, India. Electronic address:

Coastal ecosystems, one of the most productive ecosystems, are subjected to natural and anthropogenic stresses. Coastal bacterioplankton communities are highly dynamic due to spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the environmental parameters. We investigated the seasonal and spatial variation in bacterioplankton communities, their abundances and environmental drivers during one year period in Chilika, a brackish water coastal lagoon of India. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of bacterioplankton communities showed that they were dominated by heterotrophs namely α-Proteobacteria SAR11 and their sub-clades (SAR11_Ib, Chesapeake-Delaware_Bay, Candidatus_Pelagibacter, and SAR11_Surface_1), actinobacterial lineages (hgcI, CL500-29, and Candidatus_Aquiluna), β-Proteobacteria MWH-UniP1, β-Proteobacteria OM43, and verrucomicrobial clade Spartobacteria 'LD29'. Synechococcus was the dominant member within autotrophic cyanobacterial community. Response ratio derived from comparisons of taxon-specific absolute abundances and indicator analyses showed that SAR11_Surface_1 sub-clade occupied high-salinity environment especially during summer and winter and emerged as a strong indicator for mesohaline-polyhaline salinity regime. In contrast, Spartobacteria 'LD29', Actinobacteria hgcI, and CL500-29 preferred low-salinity freshwater environment and were strong indicators for oligohaline-mesohaline regimes. Spatiotemporal patterns were governed by 'distance-decay' and 'similarity-time' relationships. Bacterioplankton communities were mostly determined by salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, and pH which resulted 'species sorting' leading to biogeographical patterns in the bacterioplankton communities. Modeling analysis revealed the characteristic shift in the indicator bacterioplankton taxa along with estuarine salinity gradient. This study has provided baseline information on the bacterioplankton communities and their environmental drivers within an anthropogenically impacted cyclone prone coastal lagoon which would be useful in assessing the impact of multiple stressors on this vulnerable ecosystem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.134729DOI Listing
February 2020

Benthic archaeal community structure and carbon metabolic profiling of heterotrophic microbial communities in brackish sediments.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Mar 23;706:135709. Epub 2019 Nov 23.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon 752030, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

Benthic Archaea play a crucial role in the biogeochemical cycles and food webs, however, their spatiotemporal distribution and environmental drivers are not well investigated in brackish sediments. The composition and abundances of benthic archaeal communities were examined from a coastal lagoon; Chilika (India) which is experiencing an intense pressure from anthropogenic and natural factors. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that sediment (n = 96) archaeal communities were largely composed of Crenarchaeota (18.76%), Euryarchaeota (18.34%), Thaumarchaeota (13.45%), Woesearchaeota (10.05%), and Pacearchaeota (4.21%). Archaeal taxa affiliated to methanogens, sulfate-reducers, and ammonia-oxidizers were detected suggesting that carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles might be prominent in benthic sediments. Salinity, total organic carbon, available nitrogen, available phosphorus, macrophyte (Phragmites karka) and inter-taxa relationships between community members and with bacterial communities played steering roles in structuring the archaeal communities. Marine sites with mesohaline-polyhaline regime were dominated by Nitrosopumilus and Thaumarchaeota. In contrast, riverine sites with oligohaline regime demonstrated a higher abundance of Thermoprotei. Macrophyte dominated zones were enriched in Methanomicrobia and Methanobacteria in their rhizosphere sediments, whereas, bulk (un-vegetated) sediments were dominated by Nitrosopumilus. Spatial patterns in archaeal communities demonstrated 'distance-decay' patterns which were correlated with changes in physicochemical factors over geographical distances. Heterotrophic microbial communities showed much higher metabolic diversity and activity in their carbon utilization profiles in rhizosphere sediments than the bulk sediments. This baseline information on benthic archaea and their environmental drivers would be useful to assess the impact of anthropogenic and natural pressures on these communities and associated biogeochemical cycles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.135709DOI Listing
March 2020

Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the structure and function of sediment bacterial communities of a tropical mangrove forest.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 Feb 13;26(4):3893-3908. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon, Odisha, 752030, India.

Bacterial communities of mangrove sediments are well appreciated for their role in nutrient cycling. However, spatiotemporal variability in these communities over large geographical scale remains understudied. We investigated sediment bacterial communities and their metabolic potential in an intertidal mangrove forest of India, Bhitarkanika, using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and community-level physiological profiling. Bulk surface sediments from five different locations representing riverine and bay sites were collected over three seasons. Seasonality largely explained the variation in the structural and metabolic patterns of the sediment bacterial communities. Freshwater Actinobacteria were more abundant in monsoon, whereas γ-Proteobacteria demonstrated higher abundance in summer. Distinct differences in the bacterial community composition were noted between riverine and bay sites. For example, salt-loving marine bacteria affiliated to Oceanospirillales were more prominent in the bay sites than the riverine sites. L-asparagine, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and D-mannitol were the preferentially utilized carbon sources by bacterial communities. Bacterial community composition was largely governed by salinity and organic carbon content of the sediments. Modeling analysis revealed that the abundance of δ-Proteobacteria increased with salinity, whereas β-Proteobacteria displayed an opposite trend. Metabolic mapping of taxonomic data predicted biogeochemical functions such as xylan and chitin degradation, ammonia oxidation, nitrite reduction, and sulfate reduction in the bacterial communities suggesting their role in carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycling in mangrove sediments. This study has provided valuable clues about spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the structural and metabolic patterns of bacterial communities and their environmental determinants in a tropical mangrove forest.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-3927-5DOI Listing
February 2019

HIV status among presumptive tuberculosis cases attending tertiary care centre in South India.

Adv Respir Med 2018 ;86(5):211-214

Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India.

Introduction: In India, to increase human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) case detection, the National Technical Working Group on TB /HIV had made it mandatory to screen for HIV infection among presumptive tuberculosis (TB) cases.

Material And Methods: Our study was a cross-sectional study, conducted between June 2015 and December 2016 in a tertiary care institute (JIPMER), in South India, to estimate the prevalence of HIV among presumptive TB cases.

Results: Among the 964 presumptive TB cases who attended pulmonary medicine OPD, 189 patients were sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) positive. Among the 189 sputum positive cases, 9 were HIV positive. Of the 964 presumptive TB cases, 879 gave consent for HIV testing and 33 (3.7%) turned out to be HIV positive. If only sputum positive cases had been screened for HIV, we would have missed 24 new HIV positive cases. The number needed to screen was 27 among presumptive TB cases and 18 among TB patients.

Conclusions: The uptake of HIV testing (91%) and the diagnostic yield of 3.7% of HIV positive cases among the presumptive TB patients is quite high compared to that of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) mechanism of Puducherry. This reinforces the need to screen all the presumptive cases for HIV infection, to increase HIV case detection so that anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can be initiated early.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/ARM.2018.0033DOI Listing
June 2019

Clinical, Radiological and Bacteriological Profile of Lung Abscess - An Observational Hospital Based Study.

Open Access Maced J Med Sci 2018 Sep 23;6(9):1642-1646. Epub 2018 Sep 23.

Department of Pulmonary Medicine, JIPMER, Pondicherry, India.

Background: The incidence of lung abscess acquired in the community is unknown, but this is a common clinical problem encountered in developing countries. The incidence of lung abscess was high in the pre-antibiotic era but the advent of susceptible antibiotics it has reduced with an equal fall in mortality to 8.7%. With the emerging antibiotic resistance and change in the trends of bacteriological profile causing lung abscess, it is the need of time to reevaluate lung abscess.

Aim: The study aimed to determine the clinical, radiological and bacteriological profile of lung abscess.

Material And Method: The study was a non-randomized prospective observational study conducted in the department of pulmonary medicine for 18 months. In the study, patients > 15 years of age with clinical features of lung abscess were recruited and were subjected to chest X-ray, routine blood test. Sputum gram stain and culture, as well as antibiotic sensitivity according to the organism, were evaluated. Reports of all investigations along with patient characteristics and risk factors were analysed statistically using SPSS 20.0.

Results: Forty-six cases of lung abscess were included, and the majority of patients were found to be adults with a mean age of 42.9 years with a male to female ratio of 6.6:1. The most common predisposing factor was an unhygienic oral cavity in 28% of cases with alcohol ingestion being the most important risk factor in 22% of cases. The most common organism found in lung abscess cases was , and they were sensitive to ceftazidime.

Conclusion: Our study shows that should be considered an important pathogen in community-acquired lung abscesses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2018.374DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182528PMC
September 2018

Arthritis in sarcoidosis: A multicentric study from India.

Int J Rheum Dis 2018 Sep 5;21(9):1728-1733. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

KGMU, Lucknow, India.

Introduction: Ten to 15% of patients with sarcoidosis have associated arthritis. Chronic arthritis is fairly uncommon. There is a paucity of data on articular manifestations of the disease from India.

Methods: Case records of adult patients with sarcoidosis presenting to 11 rheumatology centers from 2005 to 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. Joint involvement was assessed clinically, classified as acute or chronic depending on duration of symptoms less or greater than 6 months, respectively.

Results: A total of 117 patients with sarcoid arthritis were reviewed. Forty-five patients were classified as having Lofgren's syndrome. The pattern of joint involvement revealed the ankle to be most commonly affected in both the groups. Shoulder, wrist, metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal joints of hands and knee joint involvement were significantly more common in chronic sarcoid arthritis. Peripheral lymphadenopathy and uveitis were significantly more frequent in chronic sarcoid arthritis. Forty out of 49 patients with acute arthritis followed up over a median of 1.8 years had achieved complete remission. Twelve out of 16 chronic sarcoid arthritis (median follow up 2.5 years) had achieved complete remission with 15, 12 and five patients on steroids, methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine, respectively. One patient with acute sarcoid arthritis with concomitant interstitial lung disease had died due to lung infection.

Conclusion: Acute oligoarthritis was the commonest presentation with the ankle being the most commonly affected joint. Upper limb joint (predominantly distal) and knee involvement were more common as reported in our largest series worldwide of chronic sarcoid arthritis in adults. Hilar adenopathy and erythema nodosum were common extra-articular features in both acute and chronic sarcoid arthritis. A limitation of the study was the retrospective nature of the analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1756-185X.13349DOI Listing
September 2018

Filarial breast lump.

BMJ Case Rep 2017 Aug 23;2017. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

Department of Pulmonary Medicine, JIPMER, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu, India.

Lymphatic filariasis is one of the most debilitating and disfiguring scourges among all diseases. This report presents a case of a woman with recurrent breast nodularity after being previously operated for a suspected breast neoplasm. We would like to highlight the issue of similar clinical presentation of a filarial breast lump and other breast lesions leading to inappropriate therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2017-221536DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5624070PMC
August 2017

Salinity and macrophyte drive the biogeography of the sedimentary bacterial communities in a brackish water tropical coastal lagoon.

Sci Total Environ 2017 Oct;595:472-485

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Barkul, Balugaon, 752030, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

Brackish water coastal lagoons are least understood with respect to the seasonal and temporal variability in their sedimentary bacterial communities. These coastal lagoons are characterized by the steep environmental gradient and provide an excellent model system to decipher the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the bacterial community structure over time and space. Using Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes from a total of 100 bulk surface sediments, we investigated the sedimentary bacterial communities, their spatiotemporal distribution, and compared them with the rhizosphere sediment communities of a common reed; Phragmites karka and a native seagrass species; Halodule uninervis in Chilika Lagoon. Spatiotemporal patterns in bacterial communities were linked to specific biotic factors (e.g., presence and type of macrophyte) and abiotic factors (e.g., salinity) that drove the community composition. Comparative assessment of communities highlighted bacterial lineages that were responsible for segregating the sediment communities over distinct salinity regimes, seasons, locations, and presence and type of macrophytes. Several bacterial taxa were specific to one of these ecological factors suggesting that species-sorting processes drive specific biogeographical patterns in the bacterial populations. Modeling of proteobacterial lineages against salinity gradient revealed that α- and γ-Proteobacteria increased with salinity, whereas β-Proteobacteria displayed the opposite trend. The wide variety of biogeochemical functions performed by the rhizosphere microbiota of P. karka must be taken into consideration while formulating the management and conservation plan for this reed. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics and functionality of sedimentary bacterial communities and highlighted the role of biotic and abiotic factors in generating the biogeographical patterns in the bacterial communities of a tropical brackish water coastal lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.03.271DOI Listing
October 2017

Breast filariasis or inflammatory breast carcinoma? Reaching a diagnosis.

BMJ Case Rep 2015 Nov 13;2015. Epub 2015 Nov 13.

Department of Pulmonary Medicine, JIPMER, Pondicherry, India.

Lymphatic filariasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by the parasite Wuchereria bancrofti. Involvement of the breast is relatively uncommon and may affect only 10% of individuals with lymphatic filariasis. We present a case of an elderly woman with breast pathology. The condition clinically appeared as a malignancy. Routine diagnostic tests including tissue histopathological studies failed to clinch a diagnosis. However, a serological test helped in identifying the pathology, which turned out to be a manifestation of breast filariasis, and aided in instituting appropriate therapy for this condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2015-212254DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4654134PMC
November 2015

Obstructive sleep apnea in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

Ren Fail 2015 Mar 7;37(2):214-8. Epub 2014 Nov 7.

Department of General Medicine, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences , Ganapthychettikulam, Kalapet, Pondicherry , India .

There is an enormous increase in the burden of chronic kidney disease both in developing and developed countries. There is a paucity of data on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in India. We used a cross-sectional prospective observational study to determine the prevalence of OSA in non-dialysis CKD patients. Of the 647 CKD patients 302 patients were in stage II, III and IV. The study population was screened using the Berlin questionnaire and 87 patients were positive for OSA (28%). Among the 87, 37 patients were excluded based on the exclusion criteria. Fifty patients underwent a split night sleep study. Stage II, III CKD patients were clubbed as early CKD or group one and stage IV CKD patients were clubbed as late CKD or group two. The spilt night study revealed an 88% incidence of OSA of varying severity. A sub group analysis was done to assess the severity of OSA. A statistical significance (p<0.05) between early and late CKD group was observed with respect to AHI and ODI. An improvement in the late CKD is observed and the Z values for AHI and ODI are 4.273 and 2.307, respectively. The prevalence and incidence of OSA was found to be 28% and 88% in non-dialysis CKD patients, respectively and the risk and severity of OSA increased with the progression of CKD stages and thus necessitating the need for screening the non-dialysis CKD population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/0886022X.2014.979730DOI Listing
March 2015