Publications by authors named "Madhavi Bhaskarabhatla"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

PI3K/AKT/mTOR hypersignaling in autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease engendered by the epistatic interplay of Sle1b and FASlpr.

Int Immunol 2007 Apr 15;19(4):509-22. Epub 2007 Mar 15.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Previous studies have demonstrated that the NZM2410/NZW 'z' allele of Sle1 on telomeric murine chromosome 1 led to lymphoproliferative autoimmunity, when acting in concert with the FAS(lpr) defect on the C57BL/6 background. The present report shows that the Sle1b sub-locus, harboring the NZM2410/NZW 'z' allele of SLAM, in epistasis with FAS(lpr), may be sufficient to induce lymphoproliferative autoimmunity. Disease in this simplified genetic model is accompanied by significant activation of the AKT signaling axis in both B- and T cells, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, 4EBP-1 and p70S6K, resulting from increased PI3K and reduced PTEN activity. In addition, blocking this axis using RAD001, an mTOR inhibitor, ameliorated lymphoproliferation and modulated serum IgG anti-nuclear auto-antibodies. Finally, mTOR inhibition also dampened signaling via parallel axes, including the MAPK and NFkB pathways. Hence, hypersignaling via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR axis appears to be an important mechanism underlying autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease, presenting itself as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxm017DOI Listing
April 2007

Excreted urinary mediators in an animal model of experimental immune nephritis with potential pathogenic significance.

Arthritis Rheum 2007 Mar;56(3):949-59

University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, New York 75390, USA.

Objective: Currently, proteinuria is viewed as the earliest indicator of renal disease in immune-mediated nephritis. The objective of this study was to determine whether additional mediators may be excreted in the urine during immune-mediated nephritis, using an experimental model with a well-defined disease course.

Methods: Urine samples from mice with anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody-induced experimental nephritis were screened using a focused immunoproteome array bearing 62 cytokines/chemokines/soluble receptors. Molecules identified through this screening assay were validated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One of these molecules was further evaluated for its pathogenic role in disease, using antibody-blocking studies.

Results: Compared with B6 and BALB/c mice, in which moderately severe immune-mediated nephritis develops, the highly nephritis-susceptible 129/Sv and DBA/1 mice exhibited significantly increased urinary levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFRI), and CXCL16, particularly at the peak of disease. Whereas some of the mediators appeared to be serum derived early in the disease course, local production in the kidneys appeared to be an important source of these mediators later in the course of disease. Both intrinsic renal cells and infiltrating leukocytes appeared to be capable of producing these mediators. Finally, antibody-mediated blocking of CXCL16 ameliorated experimental immune nephritis.

Conclusion: These studies identified VCAM-1, P-selectin, TNFRI, and CXCL16 as a quartet of molecules that have potential pathogenic significance; the levels of these molecules are significantly elevated during experimental immune nephritis. The relevance of these molecules in spontaneous immune nephritis warrants investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.22556DOI Listing
March 2007

Regulation of B cell tolerance by the lupus susceptibility gene Ly108.

Science 2006 Jun;312(5780):1665-9

Department of Internal Medicine (Rheumatology), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

The susceptibility locus for the autoimmune disease lupus on murine chromosome 1, Sle1z/Sle1bz, and the orthologous human locus are associated with production of autoantibody to chromatin. We report that the presence of Sle1z/Sle1bz impairs B cell anergy, receptor revision, and deletion. Members of the SLAM costimulatory molecule family constitute prime candidates for Sle1bz, among which the Ly108.1 isoform of the Ly108 gene was most highly expressed in immature B cells from lupus-prone B6.Sle1z mice. The normal Ly108.2 allele, but not the lupus-associated Ly108.1 allele, was found to sensitize immature B cells to deletion and RAG reexpression. As a potential regulator of tolerance checkpoints, Ly108 may censor self-reactive B cells, hence safeguarding against autoimmunity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1125893DOI Listing
June 2006

Enhanced expression of stem cell antigen-1 (Ly-6A/E) in lymphocytes from lupus prone mice correlates with disease severity.

J Autoimmun 2005 Nov 24;25(3):215-22. Epub 2005 Oct 24.

Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, and the Center for Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, 75235, USA.

B6.Sle1 mice, congenic for the NZM2410-derived lupus susceptibility locus, Sle1 on chromosome 1 exhibit many of the features seen in human lupus including activated lymphocytes and high titers of antinuclear autoantibodies. Among the different surface molecules that were aberrantly expressed on the B6.Sle1 lymphocytes was Ly-6A/E. Splenic B- and T-lymphocytes but not myeloid cells from B6.Sle1 mice exhibited enhanced levels of Ly-6A/E compared to B6 controls. In particular, MZ B cells, GC B cells and B-cell blasts expressed the highest levels of Ly-6A/E in both strains, with the levels being even higher on B6.Sle1 derived cells. Following stimulation with LPS or anti-IgM, there was a profound up-regulation in Ly-6A/E, particularly on MZ B cells and B-cell blasts. CD4 and CD8 T cells also up-regulated Ly-6A/E after stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28. These studies were extended to additional autoimmune strains including B6.Sle3, B6.Sle1.lpr and BXSB. Importantly, Ly-6A/E levels on lymphocytes were commensurate with the degree of disease exhibited by these lupus strains. Finally, it appears that increased interferon levels, in addition to antigen receptor stimulation, may also be a factor accounting for elevated Ly-6A/E in lupus. Given these observations it is important to elucidate the functional role of Ly-6A/E in lupus in future studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaut.2005.09.015DOI Listing
November 2005