Publications by authors named "Madeline Hannington"

5 Publications

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Prevalence and pain distribution of anterior knee pain in college basketball players.

J Athl Train 2021 Jul 30. Epub 2021 Jul 30.

1La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre; College of Science, Health and Engineering; La Trobe University; Australia.

Context: Causes of anterior knee pain (AKP) in jumping athletes include patellofemoral pain and patellar tendinopathy. Differential diagnosis of AKP is challenging, with variation in clinical presentations. No previous research has used pain location to describe AKP in basketball athletes.

Objectives: To describe the prevalence and pain distribution of AKP in college basketball. To report the prevalence of focal inferior pole pain using two outcome measures.

Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: University and college basketball facilities in Alberta, Canada.

Patients Or Other Participants: 242 collegiate basketball athletes Main Outcome Measure(s): The single leg decline squat test (SLDS) was used to capture pain location using pain mapping (dichotomised into focal/diffuse) and pain severity (numerical rating scale). The Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre Knee questionnaire (OSTRC-Knee) and adapted version for patellar tendinopathy (OSTRC-P) were used to report the prevalence of anterior knee pain (AKP) and patellar tendinopathy respectively. Focal inferior pole pain during the SLDS was used to classify patellar tendinopathy.

Results: Of the 242 players (138 women, 104 men), 146 (60%) reported pain with the SLDS [unilateral n=64, (26%); bilateral n=82 (34%)]. 101 (43%) reported knee pain using the OSTRC-Knee. Pain mapping captured variability in pain location. Diffuse pain was more prevalent [left 70%; right 72%] than focal pain [left 30%; right 28%]. There was low prevalence of patellar tendinopathy with either outcome measure; OSTRC-P [n=21, 8.7%] and inferior pole pain during the SLDS [n=25, 10.3%] Conclusions: Diffuse AKP was common in Canadian basketball players, however pain mapped to the inferior pole of the patella was not. Few players reported tendinopathy using the OSTRC-P, suggesting that patellar tendinopathy was not a primary knee pain presentation in this jumping cohort. Pain location rather than presence or severity of pain alone may better describe the clinical presentations of AKP in jumping athletes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-0604.20DOI Listing
July 2021

Nearly 40% of adolescent athletes report anterior knee pain regardless of maturation status, age, sex or sport played.

Phys Ther Sport 2021 Sep 27;51:29-35. Epub 2021 Jun 27.

La Trobe University Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia; Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Cabrini Institute, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia; Cabrini Institute, Cabrini Health, Malvern, VIC, Australia.

Objective: To report point prevalence of anterior knee pain (AKP) in adolescent athletes by (1) maturation status, (2) chronological age, (3) sex, and (4) primary sport.

Design: Cross-sectional.

Methods: Male and female participants aged 11-15 years were recruited from specialised sports programs for basketball, volleyball, Australian Rules Football and tennis. Standing height, sitting height, and body mass were measured and used to calculate maturity status. Past injury history, self-reported physical activity, and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Questionnaire Patellar Tendon (VISA-P) questionnaires were completed. Anterior knee pain was defined as any pain experienced on the anterior surface of the knee and recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS). A single leg decline squat (SLDS) was performed for provocation of AKP.

Results: Two hundred and seventeen male and female adolescent athletes participated in this study. Twenty participants were excluded from data analysis. Point prevalence of AKP was 39% (N = 76). Average self-reported physical activity/week was 7.9 ± 4.1 h of their specialised sport and 2.0 ± 2.0 h of other physical activity/week. Maturation status, chronological age, sex nor primary sporting program was statistically significant in explaining the presence or absence of AKP.

Conclusion: Due to the right-skewed maturation sample, the authors cannot state conclusively that maturation status was not associated with AKP. Nearly 40% of this cohort reported AKP during a pain provocation test. The presence of AKP was not explained by maturation status, age, sex or primary sport program. Given the chronic nature of AKP and future morbidity reported, this high prevalence provides rationale for intervention or prevention studies targeting younger athletes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ptsp.2021.06.005DOI Listing
September 2021

Physical Activity and Investigation With Magnetic Resonance Imaging Partly Explain Variability in the Prevalence of Patellar Tendon Abnormalities: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis of Imaging Studies in Asymptomatic Individuals.

J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2021 05 28;51(5):216-231. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Objective: To estimate the pooled prevalence of, and factors associated with, the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities observed on imaging in people without symptoms.

Design: Systematic review with stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Literature Search: We searched Embase, Scopus, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science from 1980 to August 2020.

Study Selection Criteria: We included studies that reported the prevalence of asymptomatic patellar tendon abnormalities on imaging. We excluded studies of participants with current tendon pain, a history of tendon pain, or other systemic conditions.

Data Synthesis: Stratification and meta-regression of studies based on study-level descriptive statistics (mean age, body mass index, proportion of female participants, physical activity participation, imaging modality) were performed using a random-effects model to account for between-study heterogeneity. Risk of bias was assessed using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale.

Results: Meta-analysis of 64 studies (7125 limbs from 4616 participants) found significant between-study heterogeneity (I≥90%, <.01), which precluded a summary prevalence estimate. Heterogeneity was partially explained by studies that included participants who were physically active and studies that assessed tendon abnormalities using magnetic resonance imaging compared to ultrasound (<.05). Mean age, body mass index, proportion of female participants, and sample size did not explain the remaining heterogeneity.

Conclusion: There was substantial variability in the reported prevalence of asymptomatic patellar tendon abnormalities. A clear and valid method is needed to assess and report the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities to increase research capacity and establish the clinical value of imaging the patellar tendon. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2021.10054DOI Listing
May 2021

Explaining Variability in the Prevalence of Achilles Tendon Abnormalities: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis of Imaging Studies in Asymptomatic Individuals.

J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2021 05 28;51(5):232-252. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of, and factors associated with, Achilles tendon abnormalities observed on imaging in asymptomatic individuals.

Design: Systematic review with stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Literature Search: Embase, Scopus, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science were searched from 1980 to August 2020.

Study Selection Criteria: We included studies that reported the prevalence of Achilles tendon abnormalities, observed with any imaging modality, in an asymptomatic population. We excluded studies if participant mean age was younger than 12 years or if participants had current/previous lower-limb tendon injuries/symptoms or other systemic conditions.

Data Synthesis: Random-effects proportion meta-analysis was used to estimate prevalence. We used meta-regression for continuous variables (mean age and body mass index [BMI], sample size, proportion of female participants) and stratified categorical variables (imaging modality and participation in physical activity) to explain between-study heterogeneity.

Results: We included 91 studies (10 156 limbs, 5841 participants). The prevalence of Achilles tendon abnormalities on imaging ranged from 0% to 80% per participant. Between-study heterogeneity was high (I>90%, <.001), precluding data pooling. Between-study heterogeneity was partly explained by participant mean BMI (slope, 2.8% per 1-unit increase in BMI; 95% confidence interval: 0.57%, 5.03%; = .015) and participation in physical activity per limb, and mean age of 40 years old or older ( = .022) per participant.

Conclusion: There was substantial variability in the prevalence of Achilles tendon abnormalities on imaging in asymptomatic individuals. Higher prevalence of abnormalities was associated with older age (40 years old or older), higher BMI, and participation in physical activity. A large proportion of heterogeneity remains unaccounted for, likely due to variations in abnormality definitions and study design. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2021.9970DOI Listing
May 2021

Self-reported jumpers' knee is common in elite basketball athletes - But is it all patellar tendinopathy?

Phys Ther Sport 2020 May 23;43:58-64. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Australia. Electronic address:

Objectives: To describe the prevalence and pain location of self-reported patellar tendinopathy and patellar tendon abnormality in a male elite basketball population.

Design: Cross-sectional.

Setting: Pre-season tournament.

Participants: Sixty male athletes from the Australian National Basketball League.

Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported patellar tendinopathy (PT) using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre Overuse Questionnaire (OSTRC). Pain location using pain mapping (dichotomised: focal/diffuse) and severity during the single leg decline squat. Ultrasound tissue characterisation scans of both patellar tendons.

Results: Thirteen participants (22.7%) self-reported PT. Only 3 who reported PT had localised inferior pole pain. Thirty athletes reported pain during the decline squat, 15 described focal pain; 10 diffuse pain (5 missing data). Those with diffuse pain had greater years played [Md = 21 (13-24), n = 10 than focal pain (Md = 12 (7-26), n = 15), p = 0.042, r = 0.3]. Bilateral tendon abnormality was found in 45% of athletes and 15% had unilateral tendon abnormality.

Conclusion: Elite male basketball athletes self-reporting PT had heterogeneity in pain location. When focal pain with loading was used as a primary definition of PT, 'jumpers' knee' was not common in this cohort. This study found that abnormality of the patellar tendon was common and did not correlate with symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ptsp.2020.01.012DOI Listing
May 2020
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