Publications by authors named "M U Sani"

530 Publications

Differences in socio-demographic and risk factor profile, clinical presentation, and outcomes between patients with and without RHD heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa: results from the THESUS-HF registry.

Cardiovasc Diagn Ther 2021 Aug;11(4):980-990

Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.

Background: Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was found in the THESUS-HF registry to be the third most common cause of acute heart failure (AHF) in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Methods: One thousand six patients with AHF from 9 Sub-Saharan African countries were recruited in THESUS-HF, of which 143 (14.3%) had RHD-AHF. Clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with RHD-AHF and non-RHD-AHF were compared. Kaplan-Meier plots for time to all-cause death and/or HF readmission according to the presence of RHD-AHF and non-RHD-AHF were performed and survival distributions compared using the log-rank test. Cox regression was used to determine the hazard ratio of death to day 180 and death or readmission to day 60 after adjusting for confounders.

Results: Patients with RHD-AHF were younger, more often females, had higher rates of atrial fibrillation, had less hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes, had lower BP, and higher pulse rate and better kidney function and echocardiographic higher ejection fraction larger left atria and more diastolic dysfunction. Patients with RHD-AHF had a numerically longer mean stay in the hospital (10.5 8.8 days) and significantly higher initial hospitalization mortality (9.1% 3.4%).

Conclusions: In conclusion, patients with HF related to RHD were younger, have higher rate of atrial fibrillation and have a worse short-term outcome compared to HF related to other etiologies in Sub-Saharan Africa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/cdt-21-112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8410489PMC
August 2021

Catalyst-Free Crosslinking Modification of Nata-de-Coco-Based Bacterial Cellulose Nanofibres Using Citric Acid for Biomedical Applications.

Polymers (Basel) 2021 Aug 31;13(17). Epub 2021 Aug 31.

Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Federal University Dutse, PMB 7156 Ibrahim Aliyu Bypass, Dutse 720101, Jigawa State, Nigeria.

Bacterial cellulose (BC) has gained attention among researchers in materials science and bio-medicine due to its fascinating properties. However, BC's fibre collapse phenomenon (i.e., its inability to reabsorb water after dehydration) is one of the drawbacks that limit its potential. To overcome this, a catalyst-free thermal crosslinking reaction was employed to modify BC using citric acid (CA) without compromising its biocompatibility. FTIR, XRD, SEM/EDX, TGA, and tensile analysis were carried out to evaluate the properties of the modified BC (MBC). The results confirm the fibre crosslinking phenomenon and the improvement of some properties that could be advantageous for various applications. The modified nanofibre displayed an improved crystallinity and thermal stability with increased water absorption/swelling and tensile modulus. The MBC reported here can be used for wound dressings and tissue scaffolding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym13172966DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8433797PMC
August 2021

TOAC spin-labeled peptides tailored for DNP-NMR studies in lipid membrane environments.

Biophys J 2021 Sep 2. Epub 2021 Sep 2.

School of Chemistry, Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address:

The benefit of combining in-cell solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR and cryogenic temperatures is providing sufficient signal/noise and preservation of bacterial integrity via cryoprotection to enable in situ biophysical studies of antimicrobial peptides. The radical source required for DNP was delivered into cells by adding a nitroxide-tagged peptide based on the antimicrobial peptide maculatin 1.1 (Mac1). In this study, the structure, localization, and signal enhancement properties of a single (T-MacW) and double (T-T-MacW) TOAC (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid) spin-labeled Mac1 analogs were determined within micelles or lipid vesicles. The solution NMR and circular dichroism results showed that the spin-labeled peptides adopted helical structures in contact with micelles. The peptides behaved as an isolated radical source in the presence of multilamellar vesicles, and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) electron-electron distance for the doubly spin-labeled peptide was ∼1 nm. The strongest paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) was observed for the lipid NMR signals near the glycerol-carbonyl backbone and was stronger for the doubly spin-labeled peptide. Molecular dynamics simulation of the T-T-MacW radical source in phospholipid bilayers supported the EPR and PRE observations while providing further structural insights. Overall, the T-T-MacW peptide achieved better C and N signal NMR enhancements and H spin-lattice T relaxation than T-MacW.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2021.08.040DOI Listing
September 2021

Building Research Capacity in HIV and Noncommunicable Diseases in Africa: A Mentorship and Leadership Workshop Report.

J Contin Educ Health Prof 2021 Aug 27. Epub 2021 Aug 27.

Dr. Aliyu: Professor of Health Policy and Medicine, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and Department of Health Policy and Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. Dr. Sani: Department of Medicine, Bayero University and Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. Ms. Ingles: Assistant Director, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. Ms. Tsiga-Ahmed: Assistant Professor of Community Medicine and Director of the MPH Program, Department of Community Medicine, Bayero University and Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. Mr. Musa: Associate Professor of Medicine, Departments of Medicine, Bayero University and Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria, and Africa Center of Excellence for Population Health and Policy, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria. Dr. Ahonkhai: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. Dr. Salihu: Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Center of Excellence in Health Equity, Training and Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. Dr. Audet: Associate Professor of Health Policy, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Dr. Wester: Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Introduction: Few structured mentoring programs target early-stage investigators in Africa, creating a gap in mentorship skills where HIV burden is greatest. We describe findings from a Nigeria-based workshop for early-career physician scientists to build mentoring and leadership capacity in HIV and noncommunicable disease research.

Methods: Baseline surveys captured participant demographics, confidence in implementing mentoring competencies, and perceived importance of workshop training domains. The workshop included didactic presentations, small group activities, and interactive discussions. Daily surveys evaluated sessions, and postworkshop surveys solicited overall course impressions.

Results: Of the 33 participants, most were male (n = 21, 63.6%) and from medicine, laboratory sciences, and surgical specialties. "Building mentees' confidence" and "setting mentees' research goals" were ranked as areas where participants most believed they needed training. Sessions were rated favorably across five areas. Greatest improvements in mean scores were for confidence in identifying personal temperament styles, describing mentoring and leadership theories/frameworks, and developing mentoring plans. Additional identified workshop strengths were content relevance, leadership case series, interactive nature, and collegial atmosphere. All respondents indicated learning something new/useful/helpful in each session. At 6-month postworkshop, most respondents (25 of 26, 96%) had replicated or plan to replicate parts of the workshop in their departments/institutions.

Discussion: Effective mentoring training initiatives targeting future academic leaders have the potential to create skilled academicians who can impart mentoring skills and competencies to their mentees.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CEH.0000000000000380DOI Listing
August 2021
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