Publications by authors named "M Turtle"

19 Publications

Surgery and spondylosis. Inappropriate partners.

Authors:
Mark J Turtle

BMJ 2010 Aug 24;341:c4439. Epub 2010 Aug 24.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c4439DOI Listing
August 2010

Sevoflurane, weaning and learning difficulty in the intensive care unit.

Anaesth Intensive Care 2010 Jul;38(4):783-4

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July 2010

Inadvertent subdural spread complicating cervical epidural steroid injection with local anaesthetic agent.

Authors:
S Bansal M J Turtle

Anaesth Intensive Care 2003 Oct;31(5):570-2

Anaesthetic Department, Walsgrave Hospital, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, CV2 2DX, United Kingdom.

Although cervical epidural steroid injection with local anaesthetic is considered a safe technique and widely practiced, complications may occur. We report a patient experiencing unexpected delayed high block, moderate hypotension and unconsciousness eight to ten minutes after an apparently normal cervical epidural steroid injection. The most probable diagnosis was a subdural block. Anatomical peculiarities of the epidural and subdural space in the cervical region increase the risk of subdural spread during cervical epidural injection. Fluoroscopic guidance is important during cervical epidural injection to increase certainty of correct needle placement, thus minimizing the risk of complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0310057X0303100512DOI Listing
October 2003

A clinical evaluation of platelet function, haemolysis and oxygen transfer during cardiopulmonary bypass comparing the Quantum HF-6700 to the HF-5700 hollow fibre membrane oxygenator.

Perfusion 2000 Nov;15(6):479-84

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

The continued improvement of oxygenators is an important aspect of patient safety during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The purpose of this study was to compare the Bard William Harvey HF-5700 oxygenator to the upgraded Bard Quantum HF-6700, which has recently been introduced into clinical practice. No clinical evaluation of this device has been published to date. The two oxygenators differ principally in that the Quantum has a smaller priming volume, achieved at the expense of a smaller membrane surface area which could result in sub-optimal gas exchange characteristics, increased haemolysis and increased platelet dysfunction during CPB. Twenty adult patients undergoing elective, first time coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were randomly assigned either to the HF-5700 (n=10) or to the HF-6700 (n=10) group. One patient underwent mitral valve repair in addition to CABG and was excluded from further study. There were no statistically significant differences in either preoperative or operative parameters between the two groups. Samples were obtained at the start of CPB, at 30 min, 60 min, at the end of CPB and at 1 h following termination of CPB. No significant differences between the two groups were found in oxygen transfer, haemolysis (plasma haptoglobin levels) or platelet function (a novel platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet activation test) at any of the time points during CPB. It was concluded that the Quantum HF-6700 matches the HF-5700 for the parameters studied, whilst having the advantage of requiring a smaller priming volume.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/026765910001500602DOI Listing
November 2000

A new technique for measuring cardiac output and shunt fraction during venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Perfusion 1999 Jan;14(1):43-7

St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

A new indicator dilution technique is described for measuring cardiac output and shunt fraction in patients undergoing venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Shunt fraction is the proportion of the ECMO pump flow which recirculates through the ECMO circuit (passing directly from the inflow cannula to the outflow cannula) instead of flowing through the pulmonary and systemic circulations. The indicator is an isotonic (150 mmol/l) solution of lithium chloride which is injected into the ECMO flow returning to the patient. Two lithium sensors are used simultaneously to record the resulting lithium dilution curves in arterial blood and in the blood in the ECMO circuit. Cardiac output and shunt fraction are derived from these curves. The techniques, which is simple and safe, provides measurements that allow optimal adjustment of ECMO flow and cardiovascular support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/026765919901400107DOI Listing
January 1999
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