Publications by authors named "M Taberna Sanz"

1,970 Publications

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Peripherally active dextromethorphan derivatives lower blood glucose levels by targeting pancreatic islets.

Cell Chem Biol 2021 Jun 2. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Institute for Vascular and Islet Cell Biology, German Diabetes Center (DDZ), Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Heinrich Heine University, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany; Center of Competence for Innovative Diabetes Therapy (KomIT), German Diabetes Center (DDZ), 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.), Helmholtz Zentrum München, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. Electronic address:

Dextromethorphan (DXM) acts as cough suppressant via its central action. Cell-protective effects of this drug have been reported in peripheral tissues, making DXM potentially useful for treatment of several common human diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pancreatic islets are among the peripheral tissues that positively respond to DXM, and anti-diabetic effects of DXM were observed in two placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials in humans with T2DM. Since these effects were associated with central side effects, we here developed chemical derivatives of DXM that pass the blood-brain barrier to a significantly lower extent than the original drug. We show that basic nitrogen-containing residues block central adverse events of DXM without reducing its anti-diabetic effects, including the protection of human pancreatic islets from cell death. These results show how to chemically modify DXM, and possibly other morphinans, as to exclude central side effects, while targeting peripheral tissues, such as pancreatic islets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2021.05.011DOI Listing
June 2021

Periodontal health and the initiation and progression of COVID-19.

Authors:
Mariano Sanz

J Periodontal Implant Sci 2021 Jun;51(3):145-146

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5051/jpis.215103edi01DOI Listing
June 2021

Guidelines of the Spanish ITP Group for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with immune thrombopenia.

Med Clin (Barc) 2021 Jun 2. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Grupo de investigación CB15/00055, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer, Universidad de Murcia, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, España.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.medcli.2021.03.017DOI Listing
June 2021

The Mutational Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Predicts Responses and Outcomes in Elderly Patients from the PETHEMA-FLUGAZA Phase 3 Clinical Trial.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 May 18;13(10). Epub 2021 May 18.

Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Cáncer (CIBERONC), Instituto Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain.

We sought to predict treatment responses and outcomes in older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from our FLUGAZA phase III clinical trial (PETHEMA group) based on mutational status, comparing azacytidine (AZA) with fludarabine plus low-dose cytarabine (FLUGA). Mutational profiling using a custom 43-gene next-generation sequencing panel revealed differences in profiles between older and younger patients, and several prognostic markers that were useful in young patients were ineffective in older patients. We examined the associations between variables and overall responses at the end of the third cycle. Patients with mutated or were shown to benefit from azacytidine in the treatment-adjusted subgroup analysis. An analysis of the associations with tumor burden using variant allele frequency (VAF) quantification showed that a higher overall response was associated with an increase in VAF (odds ratio (OR), 1.014; = 0.030) and lower VAF (OR, 0.981; = 0.003). In the treatment-adjusted multivariate survival analyses, only the (hazard ratio (HR), 1.9, = 0.005) and (HR, 2.6, = 9.8 × 10) variants were associated with shorter overall survival (OS), whereas only mutated (HR, 3.6, = 0.0003) was associated with a shorter relapse-free survival (RFS). Subgroup analyses of OS according to biological and genomic characteristics showed that patients with low-intermediate cytogenetic risk (HR, 1.51, = 0.045) and mutated (HR, 3.66, = 0.047) benefited from azacytidine therapy. In the subgroup analyses, patients with mutated (HR, 4.71, = 0.009) showed a better RFS in the azacytidine arm. In conclusion, differential mutational profiling might anticipate the outcomes of first-line treatment choices (AZA or FLUGA) in older patients with AML. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT02319135.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102458DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8158477PMC
May 2021

How do women living with HIV experience menopause? Menopausal symptoms, anxiety and depression according to reproductive age in a multicenter cohort.

BMC Womens Health 2021 05 28;21(1):223. Epub 2021 May 28.

National Center for Epidemiology, Institute of Health Carlos III, Avda. Monforte de Lemos, 5, 28029, Madrid, Spain.

Background: To estimate the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms and anxiety/depression and to assess the differences according to menopausal status among women living with HIV aged 45-60 years from the cohort of Spanish HIV/AIDS Research Network (CoRIS).

Methods: Women were interviewed by phone between September 2017 and December 2018 to determine whether they had experienced menopausal symptoms and anxiety/depression. The Menopause Rating Scale was used to evaluate the prevalence and severity of symptoms related to menopause in three subscales: somatic, psychologic and urogenital; and the 4-item Patient Health Questionnaire was used for anxiety/depression. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of association between menopausal status, and other potential risk factors, the presence and severity of somatic, psychological and urogenital symptoms and of anxiety/depression.

Results: Of 251 women included, 137 (54.6%) were post-, 70 (27.9%) peri- and 44 (17.5%) pre-menopausal, respectively. Median age of onset menopause was 48 years (IQR 45-50). The proportions of pre-, peri- and post-menopausal women who had experienced any menopausal symptoms were 45.5%, 60.0% and 66.4%, respectively. Both peri- and post-menopause were associated with a higher likelihood of having somatic symptoms (aOR 3.01; 95% CI 1.38-6.55 and 2.63; 1.44-4.81, respectively), while post-menopause increased the likelihood of having psychological (2.16; 1.13-4.14) and urogenital symptoms (2.54; 1.42-4.85). By other hand, post-menopausal women had a statistically significant five-fold increase in the likelihood of presenting severe urogenital symptoms than pre-menopausal women (4.90; 1.74-13.84). No significant differences by menopausal status were found for anxiety/depression. Joint/muscle problems, exhaustion and sleeping disorders were the most commonly reported symptoms among all women. Differences in the prevalences of vaginal dryness (p = 0.002), joint/muscle complaints (p = 0.032), and sweating/flush (p = 0.032) were found among the three groups.

Conclusions: Women living with HIV experienced a wide variety of menopausal symptoms, some of them initiated before women had any menstrual irregularity. We found a higher likelihood of somatic symptoms in peri- and post-menopausal women, while a higher likelihood of psychological and urogenital symptoms was found in post-menopausal women. Most somatic symptoms were of low or moderate severity, probably due to the good clinical and immunological situation of these women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12905-021-01370-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8162006PMC
May 2021