Publications by authors named "M T El-Saadony"

16 Publications

Curcumin, the active substance of turmeric: its effects on health and ways to improve its bioavailability.

J Sci Food Agric 2021 Jun 18. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Department of Biology, College of Science, United Arab Emirates University, 15551, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) is a spice utilized widely in India, China, and Southeast Asia as an aromatic stimulant, a food preservative, and coloring material. The commonly used names of turmeric are castor saffron, turmeric, and saffron root. Turmeric is a yellow-orange polyphenolic natural substance derived from C. longa rhizomes. It has been used to treat common inflammatory diseases, tumors, biliary diseases, anorexia, cough, topical wounds, diabetic injuries, liver disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. Extensive studies on the biological properties and pharmacological consequences of turmeric extracts have been conducted in recent years. Curcumin, the primary yellow biocomponent of turmeric, has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, antibacterial, antiprotozoal, antiviral, antifibrotic, immunomodulatory, and antifungal properties. Defense assessment tests showed that curcumin is well tolerated at high doses, without adverse effects. Thus, curcumin is a highly active biological material with the potential to treat different diseases in modern medicine. This current review article focuses on curcumin's biological characteristics. Additionally, the most popular methods for curcumin encapsulation are discussed. Several effective techniques and approaches have been proposed for curcuminoid capsulation, including nanocomplexing, gelation, complex coacervation, electrospraying, and solvent-free pH-driven encapsulation. This review also highlights curcumin's chemical properties, allowing the readers to expand their perspective on its use in the development of functional products with health-promoting properties. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.11372DOI Listing
June 2021

The potential mechanistic insights and future implications for the effect of prebiotics on poultry performance, gut microbiome, and intestinal morphology.

Poult Sci 2021 Mar 23;100(7):101143. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, PR China. Electronic address:

Prebiotics may modify the biological processes in the chickens' gastrointestinal tract to improve poultry performance and health. Prebiotics are natural feed additives that offer many economic advantages by decreasing mortality rates, increasing growth rates, and improving birds' feed efficiency. Prebiotic action potentially affects the degradation of indigestible dietary compounds, the synthesis of nitrogen components and vitamins, and simplifies the removal of undesirable elements in the diet. Prebiotics could also induce desirable gut microbiome modifications and affect host metabolism and immune health. It is worth mentioning that gut bacteria metabolize the prebiotic compounds into organic compounds that the host can subsequently use. It is important to limit the concept of prebiotics to compounds that influence the metabolism of resident microorganisms. Any medicinal component or feed ingredient beneficial to the intestinal microecosystem can be considered a prebiotic. In this review, the impacts of prebiotics on the gut microbiome and physiological structure are discussed, emphasizing the poultry's growth performance. The current review will highlight the knowledge gaps in this area and future research directions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psj.2021.101143DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8170421PMC
March 2021

Nutritional, antimicrobial and medicinal properties of Camel's milk: A review.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2021 May 21;28(5):3126-3136. Epub 2021 Feb 21.

Department of Poultry, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44511, Egypt.

Camel's milk is an important part of staple diet in several parts of the world, particularly in the arid and semi-arid zones. Camel's milk is rich in health-beneficial substances, such as bioactive peptides, lactoferrin, zinc, and mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids. These substances could help in the treatment of some important human diseases like tuberculosis, asthma, gastrointestinal diseases, and jaundice. Camel's milk composition is more variable compared to cow's milk. The effects of feed, breed, age, and lactation stage on milk composition are more significant in camel. Region and season significantly change the ratio of compounds in camel's milk. Camel's whey protein is not only composed of numerous soluble proteins, but also has indigenous proteases such as chymotrypsin A and cathepsin D. In addition to their high nutritional value, these whey proteins have unique characteristics, including physical, chemical, physiological, functional, and technological features that are useful in the food application. The hydrolysis of camel's milk proteins leads to the formation of bioactive peptides, which affect major organ systems of the body and impart physiological functions to these systems. The camel's milk has antioxidant, antimicrobial, angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides, antidiabetic as well as anticholesterol activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2021.02.057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8117040PMC
May 2021

Use of lemongrass essential oil as a feed additive in quail's nutrition: its effect on growth, carcass, blood biochemistry, antioxidant and immunological indices, digestive enzymes and intestinal microbiota.

Poult Sci 2021 Jun 26;100(6):101172. Epub 2021 Mar 26.

Poultry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44511, Egypt.

The present study was designed to assess the impact of dietary supplementation of lemongrass essential oil (LGEO) on growth performance, carcass traits, liver and kidney function, immunity, antioxidant indices and caecal microbiota of growing quail. A total of 200 Japanese quails at 1-week-old were haphazardly allotted to 5 groups of 40 chicks in five replicates (8 per replicate). The first group was the control group, while LGEO was added at levels of 150, 300, 450, and 600 mg/kg diet in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th groups, respectively. Dietary supplementation of LGEO (150, 300 and 450 mg/ kg diet) increased body weight at 3 and 5 wk of age, and increased body weight gain during all periods compared with the control group (P < 0.05). All levels of LGEO improved feed conversion ratio during the periods from 1 to 3 and 1 to 5 wk of age. During 3 to 5 wk, feed conversion ratio was improved in quails fed LGEO (300 and 450 mg/kg diet) compared with the control and other treatments. Carcass traits, plasma globulin, alanine aminotransferase, and urea values did not differ among the treatments (P > 0.05), but the activity of aspartate aminotransferase in the plasma was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in LGEO-treated groups. The total protein and albumin values were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in quails fed levels of LGEO (except 600 mg/kg diet) compared with the control. The inclusion of LGEO in quail diets improved (P < 0.05) plasma lipid profile. The dietary supplementation of LGEO increased (linear and quadratic, P < 0.05) plasma immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG, and IgA) levels, lysozyme values and activities of superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione and catalase compared with the control group. The caecal Coliform, E. coli and Salmonella were lowered (P < 0.0001) in the quails treated with all LGEO levels, but the total bacterial count and Lactobacillus count were increased with dietary supplementation of LGEO levels (300 and 450 mg/kg) compared with those in the control group. The activities of digestive enzymes were significantly higher in birds fed the diet supplemented with LGEO levels than those fed the control diet. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of LGEO can improve the performance, lipid profile, immunity and antioxidant indices and decline intestinal pathogens and thus boost the health status of growing quail.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psj.2021.101172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8111249PMC
June 2021

Ways to minimize bacterial infections, with special reference to Escherichia coli, to cope with the first-week mortality in chicks: an updated overview.

Poult Sci 2021 May 11;100(5):101039. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Poultry, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44511, Egypt.

On the commercial level, the poultry industry strives to find new techniques to combat bird's infection. During the first week, mortality rate increases in birds because of several bacterial infections of about ten bacterial species, especially colisepticemia. This affects the flock production, uniformity, and suitability for slaughter because of chronic infections. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causes various disease syndromes in poultry, including yolk sac infection (omphalitis), respiratory tract infection, and septicemia. The E. coli infections in the neonatal poultry are being characterized by septicemia. The acute septicemia may cause death, while the subacute form could be characterized through pericarditis, airsacculitis, and perihepatitis. Many E. coli isolates are commonly isolated from commercial broiler chickens as serogroups O, O, and O. Although prophylactic antibiotics were used to control mortality associated with bacterial infections of neonatal poultry in the past, the commercial poultry industry is searching for alternatives. This is because of the consumer's demand for reduced antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Despite the vast and rapid development in vaccine technologies against common chicken infectious diseases, no antibiotic alternatives are commercially available to prevent bacterial infections of neonatal chicks. Recent research confirmed the utility of probiotics to improve the health of neonatal poultry. However, probiotics were not efficacious to minimize death and clinical signs associated with neonatal chicks' bacterial infections. This review focuses on the causes of the increased mortality in broiler chicks during the first week of age and the methods used to minimize death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psj.2021.101039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8010699PMC
May 2021