Publications by authors named "M R Bailey"

2,755 Publications

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in its biofilm state promotes neurodevelopment after experimental necrotizing enterocolitis in rats.

Brain Behav Immun Health 2021 Jul 6;14. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA.

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease affecting premature newborns with no known cure. Up to half of survivors subsequently exhibit cognitive impairment and neurodevelopmental defects. We created a novel probiotics delivery system in which the probiotic () was induced to form a biofilm [ (biofilm)] by incubation with dextranomer microspheres loaded with maltose (-DM-maltose). We have previously demonstrated that a single dose of the probiotic administered in its biofilm state significantly reduces the incidence of NEC and decreases inflammatory cytokine production in an animal model of the disease. The aim of our current study was to determine whether a single dose of the probiotic administered in its biofilm state protects the brain after experimental NEC. We found that rat pups exposed to NEC reached developmental milestones significantly slower than breast fed pups, with mild improvement with (biofilm) treatment. Exposure to NEC had a negative effect on cognitive behavior, which was prevented by (biofilm) treatment. administration also reduced anxiety-like behavior in NEC-exposed rats. The behavioral effects of NEC were associated with increased numbers of activated microglia, decreased myelin basic protein (MBP), and decreased neurotrophic gene expression, which were prevented by administration of (biofilm). Our data indicate early enteral treatment with in its biofilm state prevented the deleterious effects of NEC on developmental impairments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbih.2021.100256DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8294173PMC
July 2021

How Well Do Automated Linking Methods Perform? Lessons from U.S. Historical Data.

J Econ Lit 2020 Dec;58(4):997-1044

University of Michigan.

This paper reviews the literature in historical record linkage in the U.S. and examines the performance of widely-used record linking algorithms and common variations in their assumptions. We use two high-quality, hand-linked datasets and one synthetic ground truth to examine the direct effects of linking algorithms on data quality. We find that (1) no algorithm (including hand-linking) consistently produces representative samples; (2) 15 to 37 percent of links chosen by widely-used algorithms are classified as errors by trained human reviewers; and (3) false links are systematically related to baseline sample characteristics, showing that some algorithms may induce systematic measurement error into analyses. A case study shows that the combined effects of (1)-(3) attenuate estimates of the intergenerational income elasticity by up to 20 percent, and common variations in algorithm assumptions result in greater attenuation. As current practice moves to automate linking and increase link rates, these results highlight the important potential consequences of linking errors on inferences with linked data. We conclude with constructive suggestions for reducing linking errors and directions for future research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1257/jel.20191526DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8294155PMC
December 2020

A Comparison of Colonizing Ability Between Enteritidis and Heidelberg in Broiler Chickens Challenged Through Feed Administration.

Foodborne Pathog Dis 2021 Jul 20. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Department of Poultry Science, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA.

With over 1 million estimated cases per year in the United States, foodborne salmonellosis is an important public health issue. Chicken products are frequent sources of foodborne infection. These bacteria readily colonize the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens, and feed is a known vector. Past research has demonstrated that the survivability of in feed is dependent on the serovar and strain. Therefore, the objective of this research was to compare colonization incidence of these two serovars in broiler chicken tissues by administration of feed contaminated with serovar Enteritidis (SE) or serovar Heidelberg (SH). A comparison was made with equal conditions so that there was no influence of other factors. Birds were inoculated by addition of to the feed (1 × 10 colony-forming unit [CFU]/g of feed) at 14 days of age, and the following tissue samples were collected from each bird after grow-out (days 34-41 depending on the trial): abdominal cavity swab, bone marrow swab, cloaca swab, lung swab, breast, bursa and thymus, ceca, crop, kidney, liver and spleen, skin, spinal cord, thigh, and trachea. A higher percentage of birds inoculated with SE were positive in at least one tissue compared with SH (68% and 9%, respectively), and the SE inoculated birds also showed a higher number of positive tissue samples than SH (13.1% and 0.7%, respectively). Recovery of SH was low for all tissue samples. However, recovery of SE was variable between samples, with ceca showing the highest percentage (50%). These results indicate that challenge at day 14 through feed administration results in greater colonization by SE compared with SH, suggesting that monitoring and control methods for in feed should focus on SE to have the greatest positive effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2021.0016DOI Listing
July 2021

An integrative review to identify how nurses practicing in inpatient specialist palliative care units uphold the values of nursing.

BMC Palliat Care 2021 Jul 16;20(1):111. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, Health Research Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, V94 T9PX, Ireland.

Background: Caring for individuals and their families with a life-limiting, symptomatic illness and those who are dying has long been an integral role of palliative care nurses. Yet, over the last two decades, the specialty of palliative care has undergone significant changes in technology and medical treatments which have altered both the disease trajectory and the delivery of palliative care. To date, there is little evidence as to the impact of these medical and nursing advancements on the role of nurses working in palliative care and how in clinical practice these nurses continue to uphold their nursing values and the philosophy of palliative care.

Methods: An integrative review was conducted searching seven academic databases from the time period of January 2010 - December 2019 for studies identifying research relating to the role of the palliative care nurse working in specialist palliative care units and hospices. Research articles identified were screened against the inclusion criteria. Data extraction was completed on all included studies and the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool was utilized to appraise the methodological quality and thematic analysis was performed guided by Braun and Clarke's framework. The review was conducted and reported in lines with PRISMA guidelines.

Results: The search yielded 22,828 articles of which 7 were included for appraisal and review. Four themes were identified: (1) enhancing patient-centred care (2) being there (3) exposure to suffering and death (4) nursing values seen but not heard. The findings highlight that while palliative care nurses do not articulate their nurse values, their actions and behaviors evident within the literature demonstrate care, compassion, and commitment.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that there is a need for nurses working in specialist palliative care units to articulate, document, and audit how they incorporate the values of nursing into their practice. This is pivotal not only for the future of palliative nursing within hospice and specialist palliative care units but also to the future of palliative care itself. To make visible the values of nursing further practice-based education and research is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-021-00810-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8285858PMC
July 2021

Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Cincinnati Ohio USA from August to December 2020.

PLoS One 2021 14;16(7):e0254667. Epub 2021 Jul 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United State of America.

The world is currently in a pandemic of COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease-2019) caused by a novel positive-sense, single-stranded RNA β-coronavirus referred to as SARS-CoV-2. Here we investigated rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the greater Cincinnati, Ohio, USA metropolitan area from August 13 to December 8, 2020, just prior to initiation of the national vaccination program. Examination of 9,550 adult blood donor volunteers for serum IgG antibody positivity against the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein showed an overall prevalence of 8.40%, measured as 7.56% in the first 58 days and 9.24% in the last 58 days, and 12.86% in December 2020, which we extrapolated to ~20% as of March, 2021. Males and females showed similar rates of past infection, and rates among Hispanic or Latinos, African Americans and Whites were also investigated. Donors under 30 years of age had the highest rates of past infection, while those over 60 had the lowest. Geographic analysis showed higher rates of infectivity on the West side of Cincinnati compared with the East side (split by I-75) and the lowest rates in the adjoining region of Kentucky (across the Ohio river). These results in regional seroprevalence will help inform efforts to best achieve herd immunity in conjunction with the national vaccination campaign.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0254667PLOS
July 2021
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