Publications by authors named "M P Hector"

82 Publications

Imaging of facial neuritis using T2-weighted gradient-echo fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition after gadolinium injection.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Sep 22. Epub 2020 Sep 22.

Service de Radiologie 1, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 Avenue Molière, 67200, Strasbourg, France.

Background: MRI is the modality of choice for the imaging of facial neuritis. Previously, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging of the petrous bone, then FLAIR sequences were thought to be most informative for acute facial neuritis imaging. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of contrast-enhanced T2-weighted sequence for the diagnosis of acute facial neuritis and compare it to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and FLAIR sequences.

Methods: We included 50 patients with an acute unilateral idiopathic peripheral facial neuritis. An MRI (3 T) with three sequences was performed (T1-weighted, T2-weighted and FLAIR), all acquired after intravenous contrast-media injection.

Results: The contrast-enhanced T2-weighted sequence appeared to be the most accurate one for the diagnosis of acute facial neuritis (Se 94%, Sp 100%, accuracy 98.2%, p < 0.001), with a pathological facial nerve strongly (grade 2-3) enhancing and a homogenous enhancement along the course of the entire facial nerve. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (Se 80%, Sp 100%, accuracy 94.1%) and FLAIR sequences (92%, Sp 88%, accuracy 90%, p < 0.001) showed lower accuracy. On T1-weighted sequence, a strong enhancement (blurred margins) of the canalicular segment was observed in 80% of the cases when it was never observed in normal nerves.

Conclusion: A strong (= iso to hyperintense to the petrous fat signal) and diffuse (all segments) enhancement of the facial nerve on T2-weighted steady-state free precession sequence is a sensitive and specific sign for the diagnosis of acute idiopathic facial neuritis, and appears superior to T1WI and FLAIR sequences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-020-06375-zDOI Listing
September 2020

Impact of Demographic Factors, Obesity, and Oral Health Status on Self-esteem among School-going Children in United Arab Emirates: A Cross-sectional Study.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2020 May-Jun;10(3):329-335. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Center of Oral Growth and Development (Paediatric Dentistry), Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine if oral health, obesity, and demographic factors have an impact on self-esteem among school-going children in United Arab Emirates.

Materials And Methods: Ten schools (six private and four public) were selected using random digit table. Decayed, missing, and filled teeth index according to the World Health Organization criteria was used to assess dental caries. Obesity was measured by body mass index (BMI = weight [kg]/height [m]). Data related to demographic details and toothbrushing were collected and entered into assessment forms. The mental well-being was assessed using Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale.

Results: Self-esteem score was 19.8 (standard deviation [SD], ±3.8) mean, and ranged from 19.1 to 20.5. The presence or absence of dental caries or their body shape (obesity/overweight/normal weight) had no impact on the self-esteem scores. Of the participants, 93% brushed daily, whereas the brushing frequency was significantly greater in female children (98%) ( < 0.001) and children with higher self-esteem scores ( = 0.066). The self-esteem scores of school children was positively associated with age as elder children had higher scores ( = 0.001). Children of Indian origin had lower self-esteem ( = 0.004). BMI was negatively associated ( = 0.006).

Conclusion: Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale scores were found to be lower in young children and Indian children. The child's obesity and dental caries status had no significant influence on their self-esteem. High self-esteem in older children can be linked with increased toothbrushing frequency.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_422_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7402253PMC
April 2020

A core curriculum in the biological and biomedical sciences for dentistry.

Eur J Dent Educ 2020 Aug 19;24(3):433-441. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Introduction: The biomedical sciences (BMS) are a central part of the dental curriculum that underpins teaching and clinical practice in all areas of dentistry. Although some specialist groups have proposed curricula in their particular topic areas, there is currently no overarching view of what should be included in a BMS curriculum for undergraduate dental programmes. To address this, the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) convened a Special Interest Group (SIG) with representatives from across Europe to develop a consensus BMS curriculum for dental programmes.

Curriculum: This paper summarises the outcome of the deliberations of this SIG and details a consensus view from the SIG of what a BMS curriculum should include.

Conclusions: Given the broad nature of BMS applied to dentistry, this curriculum framework is advisory and seeks to provide programme planners with an indicative list of topics which can be mapped to specific learning objectives within their own curricula. As dentistry becomes increasingly specialised, these will change, or some elements of the undergraduate curriculum may move to the post-graduate setting. So, this document should be seen as a beginning and it will need regular review as BMS curricula in dentistry evolve.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eje.12518DOI Listing
August 2020

Detection of Fusobacterium in oral and head and neck cancer samples: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Arch Oral Biol 2020 Apr 27;112:104669. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

Aims: This systematic review aimed to analyse: a) the presence and the abundance of Fusobacterium; b) the Fusobacterium species most often found, and c) the most common methods used for their identification in oral/head and neck cancer samples.

Design: A protocol was registered on PROSPERO database. This review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Literature search was performed on five electronic biomedical databases, namely Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane from their start dates to 30 August 2018. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility for inclusion; extracted the data; and evaluated the risk of bias.

Results: From 118 unique abstract records, 88 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 17 publications were included in this review. Meta-analysis showed an increased prevalence of 6 % (95 % CI, 3-9) of Fusobacterium in tumour lesions than in non-tumour lesions (Fusobacterium prevalence of 16 % in tumour lesions and of 10 % in non-tumour lesions), and a 2.93 higher chance of Fusobacterium being present in tumour lesions (95 % CI, 1.47-5.81). The most common detection methods were based on molecular evidence (64.70 %) (95 % CI, 37.7-84.7). F. nucleatum was the most prevalent species (47.06 %) (95 % CI, 23.5-72).

Conclusion: In conclusion, Fusobacterium is present and in higher abundance in oral/head and neck cancer samples when compared to non-cancer samples, suggesting that Fusobacterium may contribute to oral/head and neck cancer development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2020.104669DOI Listing
April 2020

Correlation between parotid saliva composition and dental caries using P-NMR and ICDAS score.

Arch Oral Biol 2020 Mar 7;111:104651. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Dental Physical Sciences Unit, Centre for Oral Bioengineering, Institute of Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS, United Kingdom.

Objectives: The preservation of enamel mineral is influenced by the supersaturation of salivary secretions with respect to calcium phosphate salts. The aim was to measure the chemical environmental state of phosphate ions in a subject's parotid saliva, and to correlate this with their dental caries score, by means of P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (P-NMR) and the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS).

Design: Unilateral paraffin wax stimulated parotid saliva samples were collected from 21 healthy adult subjects using a Lashley cup. The flowrate was recorded during collection. Clinical caries scores of each subject were classified using the ICDAS score. The pH was recorded for each saliva sample. P-NMR spectra of each saliva sample were obtained to determine the phosphorus chemical environment. All the collected data were analysed by Pearson's correlation.

Results: Parotid saliva flow rates were in the range from 0.07 to 0.56 ml/min. The pH varied from 5.9 to 7.6. Each P-NMR spectrum showed a single broad line with a chemical shift between 0.07 and 2.38 ppm. At neutral pH the maximum chemical shift was 2.05 ppm, whereas at a lower pH values the phosphorous chemical shift reduced, to 0.34 at pH 5.9. The flowrate and the P-NMR chemical shift correlated positively (r = 0.71; p < 0.05). The ICDAS score correlated negatively with the P-NMR chemical shift (r = 0.43; p < 0.05).

Conclusions: This parotid saliva P-NMR study has shown that different phosphate states exist within saliva, which significantly influence its inorganic chemical behaviour, and therefore its cariostatic activity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2020.104651DOI Listing
March 2020