Publications by authors named "M O Folayan"

184 Publications

Correction to: An ecological study on the association between universal health service coverage index, health expenditures, and early childhood caries.

BMC Oral Health 2021 May 26;21(1):278. Epub 2021 May 26.

Department of Preventive Dental Science, Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, and Departments of Pediatrics and Child Health and Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-021-01624-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8157740PMC
May 2021

Early childhood caries: Are maternal psychosocial factors, decision-making ability, and caries status risk indicators for children in a sub-urban Nigerian population?

BMC Oral Health 2021 05 4;21(1):73. Epub 2021 May 4.

School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.

Objective: Early childhood caries (ECC) is caries in children below the age of 72 months. The aim of the study was to determine the association of maternal psychosocial factors (general anxiety, dental anxiety, sense of coherence, parenting stress, fatalism, social support, depressive symptoms, and executive dysfunction), decision-making abilities, education, income and caries status with the prevalence and severity of ECC among children resident in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Methods: A dataset of 1549 mother-child (6-71-months-old) dyads collected through examinations and a household survey, using validated psychometric tools to measure the psychosocial factors, were analyzed. The DMFT for the mothers and the dmft for the child were determined. The association between maternal psychosocial factors, education, income, and decision-making ability, the prevalence of maternal caries, and the prevalence of ECC was determined using logistic regression analysis.

Results: The prevalence of maternal caries was 3.3%, and the mean (standard deviation-SD) DMFT was 0.10 (0.76). The ECC prevalence was 4.3%, and the mean (SD) dmft was 0.13 (0.92). There was no significant difference between the prevalence and severity of maternal caries and ECC by maternal age, education, income, or decision-making abilities. There was also no significant difference in maternal caries, ECC prevalence and ECC severity by maternal psychosocial factors. The only significant association was between the prevalence of caries in the mother and children: children whose mothers had caries were over six times more likely to have ECC than were children with mothers who had no caries (AOR: 6.67; 95% CI 3.23-13.79; p < 0.001).

Conclusion: The significant association between ECC and maternal caries prevalence suggests that prenatal oral health care for mothers may reduce the risk for ECC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-020-01324-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8094474PMC
May 2021

Association between mental health, caries experience and gingival health of adolescents in sub-urban Nigeria.

BMC Oral Health 2021 04 30;21(1):223. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

International Research Center of Excellence, Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Abuja, Nigeria.

Background: This study assessed the association of mental health problems and risk indicators of mental health problems with caries experience and moderate/severe gingivitis in adolescents.

Methods: A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in Osun State, Nigeria. Data collected from 10 to 19-years-old adolescents between December 2018 and January 2019 were sociodemographic variables (age, sex, socioeconomic status); oral health indicators (tooth brushing, use of fluoridated toothpaste, consumption of refined carbohydrates in-between-meals, dental services utilization, dental anxiety and plaque); mental health indicators (smoking habits, intake of alcohol and use of psychoactive drugs) and mental health problems (low and high). Gingival health (healthy gingiva/mild gingivitis versus moderate/severe gingivitis) and caries experience (present or absent) were also assessed. A series of five logistic regression models were constructed to determine the association between presence of caries experience and presence of moderate/severe gingivitis) with blocks of independent variables. The blocks were: model 1-sociodemographic factors; model 2-oral health indicators; model 3-mental health indicators and model 4-mental health problems. Model 5 included all factors from models 1 to 4.

Results: There were 1234 adolescents with a mean (SD) age of 14.6 (2.7) years. Also, 21.1% of participants had high risk of mental health problems, 3.7% had caries experience, and 8.1% had moderate/severe gingivitis. Model 5 had the best fit for the two dependent variables. The use of psychoactive substances (AOR 2.67; 95% CI 1.14, 6.26) was associated with significantly higher odds of caries experience. The frequent consumption of refined carbohydrates in-between-meals (AOR: 0.41; 95% CI 0.25, 0.66) and severe dental anxiety (AOR0.48; 95% CI 0.23, 0.99) were associated with significantly lower odds of moderate/severe gingivitis. Plaque was associated with significant higher odds of moderate/severe gingivitis (AOR 13.50; 95% CI 8.66, 21.04). High risk of mental health problems was not significantly associated with caries experience (AOR 1.84; 95% CI 0.97, 3.49) or moderate/severe gingivitis (AOR 0.80; 95% CI 0.45, 1.44).

Conclusion: The association between mental problems and risk indicators with oral diseases in Nigerian adolescents indicates a need for integrated mental and oral health care to improve the wellbeing of adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-021-01589-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8086282PMC
April 2021

Associations between a history of sexual abuse and dental anxiety, caries experience and oral hygiene status among adolescents in sub-urban South West Nigeria.

BMC Oral Health 2021 04 19;21(1):196. Epub 2021 Apr 19.

International Research Center of Excellence, Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Abuja, Nigeria.

Introduction: Sexual and oral health are important areas of focus for adolescent wellbeing. We assessed for the prevalence of sexual abuse among adolescents, oral health factors associated with this history, and investigated whether sexual abuse was a risk indicator for dental anxiety, caries experience and poor oral hygiene.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted between December 2018 and January 2019 among adolescents 10-19 years old in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Survey data collected included respondents' age, sex, and socioeconomic status, oral health risk factors (dental anxiety, frequency of tooth brushing intake of refined carbohydrates in-between-meals, flossing, dental visits, smoking, alcohol intake, use of psychoactive substances), caries experience, oral hygiene status, history of sexual abuse, and sexual risk behaviors (age of sexual debut, history of transactional sex, last sexual act with or without condom, multiple sex partners). Regression models were constructed to determine the association between outcome variables (dental anxiety, presence of caries experience and poor oral hygiene) and explanatory variables (oral health risk factors and history of sexual abuse).

Results: The prevalence of sexual abuse in our cohort was 5.9%: 4.3% among males and 7.9% among females. A history of sexual abuse was associated with alcohol consumption (p = 0.009), cigarette smoking (p = 0.001), and a history of transactional sex (p = 0.01). High/severe dental anxiety was significantly associated with increased odds of a history of sexual abuse (AOR = 1.81; 95% CI 1.10, 2.98), but not with caries experience (AOR = 0.66; 95% CI 0.15, 2.97) nor poor oral hygiene (AOR = 1.68; 95% CI 0.95, 2.96). Dental anxiety was associated with increased odds of alcohol intake (AOR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.19, 2.56), twice daily tooth brushing (AOR = 1.48; 95% CI 1.01, 2.17) and daily consumption of refined carbohydrates in-between-meals (AOR = 2.01; 95% CI 1.60, 2.54). Caries experience was associated with increased odds of using psychoactive substances (AOR = 4.83; 95% CI 1.49, 15.62) and having low socioeconomic status (AOR = 0.40; 95% CI 0.18, 0.92). Poor oral hygiene was associated with increased odds of having middle socioeconomic status (AOR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.05, 1.93) and daily consumption of refined carbohydrates in-between-meals (AOR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.08, 1.78).

Conclusion: Adolescents who are highly dentally anxious need to be screened for a history of sexual abuse to facilitate access to professional care and support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-021-01562-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8054361PMC
April 2021

Individual and familial factors associated with caries and gingivitis among adolescents resident in a semi-urban community in South-Western Nigeria.

BMC Oral Health 2021 03 27;21(1):166. Epub 2021 Mar 27.

International Research Center of Excellence, Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.

Objectives: We describe the prevalence, and individual and familial risk indicators for dental caries and gingivitis among 10-19-year-old adolescents in Ile-Ife, South-West Nigeria.

Methods: This cross-sectional study collected data through household surveys conducted between December 2018 and January 2019. Adolescents were recruited through multistage sampling. Oral health outcomes were caries, measured by the 'Decayed, Missing due to caries, and Filled Teeth' (DMFT) index, and gingivitis, measured by the Loe and Silness gingival index. Explanatory variables were individual (sex, age, oral health perception) and familial (socioeconomic status, birth rank, family size and parental living status) factors. Oral health behaviors (daily tooth-brushing, use of fluoridated toothpaste, consuming refined carbohydrates in-between meals, use of dental floss, dental service utilization in past 12 months, and smoking habits) were treated as confounders. Poisson regression models with robust estimation were constructed to determine associations between explanatory factors and oral health outcomes.

Results: A total of 1472 adolescents were surveyed. Caries prevalence was 3.4%, with mean (standard deviation) DMFT of 0.06 (0.36) and plaque index of 0.84 (0.56). Only 128 (8.7%) adolescents brushed their teeth twice daily, 192 (16.1%) used dental floss daily, 14 (1.1%) utilized dental services in the last 12 months, and 508 (36.1%) consumed refined carbohydrates in-between meals less than once daily. The proportion of respondents who currently smoked cigarettes was 1.6%, and 91.7% of respondents used fluoridated toothpaste daily. The adjusted prevalence ratio of having caries increased by 18% for every additional age-year (APR: 1.18; 95% CI 1.004, 1.34). Additionally, participants with high socioeconomic status had significantly lower prevalence of caries compared to those with lower status (APR: 0.40; 95% CI 0.17, 0.91). Moderate/severe gingivitis was significantly associated with higher frequency of consuming refined carbohydrates in-between meals (APR: 2.33; 95% CI 1.36, 3.99) and higher plaque index scores (APR: 16.24; 95% CI 9.83, 26.82).

Conclusion: Caries prevalence increased with increasing age and was higher among Nigerian adolescents with low socioeconomic status, while moderate/severe gingivitis was associated with frequent consumption of refined carbohydrates and higher plaque index score. While behavioral interventions may reduce the risk of gingivitis, structural interventions may be needed to reduce the risk for caries in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-021-01527-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8004454PMC
March 2021