Publications by authors named "M Massoud"

183 Publications

Estimated insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular risk, and hepatic steatosis after 12 years from the onset of T1D.

Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2021 Jun 2:e3479. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Research Area for Multifactorial Diseases and Complex Phenotypes, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital and IRCCS, Rome, Italy.

Aim: To test the hypothesis that intensive insulin treatment and optimal glycaemic control are not fully protective against reduction of insulin sensitivity in children with type 1 diabetes.

Material And Methods: Cohort study of 78 normal-weight patients with prepubertal onset (T ) and follow-up waves at 1 (T ), 5 (T ), 10 (T ), and 12 (T ) years; matched for age and sex to 30 controls at T . Estimated insulin sensitivity (eIS) by three formulae; ultrasound evaluation of para and perirenal fat thickness; hepatic steatosis (HS); carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) at T .

Results: At T12, the 36 patients (46%) who had constantly or prevalently haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) < 58 mmol/l during follow-up showed better eIS indexes (p = 0.049 to <0.0001); lipid profile (p = 0.042 to <0.0001), reduced fat mass (p = 0.012) and required lower insulin dose (p = 0.032) than the 42 patients (54%) with HbA1c ≥ 58 at T12. Patients (N = 25) with eIS  < 8.77 mg kg  min showed higher cIMT (p < 0.0001). HS was found in 6 patients (∼8%). In patients and normal-weight controls, fat mass (p = 0.03), age (p = 0.03), cIMT (p = 0.05) predicted HS; eIS indexes (p from 0.04 to <0.0001) predicted cIMT. Body mass index, perirenal fat, fat mass, and triglycerides to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio were associated with eIS indexes (p from 0.03 to <0.0001).

Conclusions: Young T1D patients have reduced insulin sensitivity and higher cIMT. Adiposity, glucose, and lipid control over follow-up are likely to influence both. Enhanced adiposity seems of paramount relevance for the onset of HS in T1D patients alike in healthy youths.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.3479DOI Listing
June 2021

Determinants of Waste Management Practices and Willingness to Pay for Improving Waste Services in a Low-Middle Income Country.

Environ Manage 2021 Apr 28. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.

In many low and middle-income countries, solid waste management (SWM) systems remain weak and lack standardization. Moreover, these systems fail to account for citizen's insight on the proposed solid waste initiatives. This study aims to identify the main determinants of SWM practices in a low-middle income country while accounting for citizens' perceived knowledge, attitudes, structural barriers, and willingness to pay for different services. Three communities were thus selected with varying socioeconomic factors and where different SWM practices were adopted. A cross-sectional study based on an interviewer-administered questionnaire was conducted across the three areas. Our results showed that increased knowledge and awareness of proper SWM did not correlate with people's attitudes nor with their adoption of positive waste management practices, such as reusing, reducing, recycling, and sorting of waste. Nevertheless, the results showed that the presence of an effective SWM system in a community positively influenced people's attitudes. Structural determinants, including the lack of appropriate facilities and adequate infrastructure, weak public knowledge on sorting, recycling, and composting, as well as the absence of guiding policies, appeared to be core barriers hindering the adoption of sustainable waste management practices across the three communities. The results of this study highlight the importance of establishing integrated SWM systems in developing countries, as they appear to trigger positive behaviors by the serviced citizens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00267-021-01472-zDOI Listing
April 2021

Rapid Isolation of Functional Human Skin Tissue-Resident Memory T Lymphocytes.

Front Immunol 2021 22;12:624013. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Cell Biology, Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum Berlin, Institute of the Leibniz Association, Berlin, Germany.

Studies in animal models have shown that skin tissue-resident memory T (T) cells provide enhanced and immediate effector function at the site of infection. However, analyses of skin T cells in humans have been hindered by the lack of an optimized isolation protocol. Here, we present a combinatorial strategy-the 6-h collagenase IV digestion and gentle tissue dissociation - for rapid and efficient isolation of skin T cells with skin tissue-specific immune features. In comparison with paired blood circulating memory T cells, these isolated skin T cells express typical T cell markers and display higher polyfunctional properties. Moreover, these isolated cells can also be assessed for longer periods of time in cultures. Thus, the optimized isolation protocol provides a valuable tool for further understanding of human skin T cells, especially for direct comparison with peripheral blood T cells at the same sample collection time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.624013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8019735PMC
March 2021

Politics of disease control in Africa and the critical role of global health diplomacy: A systematic review.

Health Promot Perspect 2021 7;11(1):20-31. Epub 2021 Feb 7.

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Global Health Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Africa is facing the triple burden of communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and nutritional disorders. Multilateral institutions, bilateral arrangements, and philanthropies have historically privileged economic development over health concerns. That focus has resulted in weak health systems and inadequate preparedness when there are outbreaks of diseases. This review aims to understand the politics of disease control in Africa and global health diplomacy's (GHD's) critical role. A literature review was done in Medline/PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase, and Google scholar search engines. Keywords included MeSH and common terms related to the topics: "Politics," "disease control," "epidemics/ endemics," and "global health diplomacy" in the "African" context. The resources also included reports of World Health Organization, United Nations and resolutions of the World Health Assembly (WHA). African countries continue to struggle in their attempts to build health systems for disease control that are robust enough to tackle the frequent epidemics that plague the continent. The politics of disease control requires the crafting of cooperative partnerships to accommodate the divergent interests of multiple actors. Recent outbreaks of COVID-19 and Ebola had a significant impact on African economies. It is extremely important to prioritize health in the African development agendas. The African Union (AU) should leverage the momentum of the rise of GHD to (i) navigate the politics of global health governance in an interconnected world(ii) develop robust preparedness and disease response strategies to tackle emerging and reemerging disease epidemics in the region (iii) address the linkages between health and broader human security issues driven by climate change-induced food, water, and other insecurities (iv) mobilize resources and capacities to train health officials in the craft of diplomacy. The AU, Regional Economic Communities (RECs), and African Centres for Disease Control should harmonize their plans and strategies and align them towards a common goal that integrates health in African development agendas. The AU must innovatively harness the practice and tools of GHD towards developing the necessary partnerships with relevant actors in the global health arena to achieve the health targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/hpp.2021.04DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967135PMC
February 2021

Prenatal Imaging Features and Postnatal Outcome of Short Corpus Callosum: A Series of 42 Cases.

Fetal Diagn Ther 2021 8;48(3):217-226. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Centre Pluridisciplinaire de Diagnostic Prénatal, Hôpital Femme Mère Enfant, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon-Bron, France,

Objectives: Our goal was to provide a better understanding of isolated short corpus callosum (SCC) regarding prenatal diagnosis and postnatal outcome.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed prenatal and postnatal imaging, clinical, and biological data from 42 cases with isolated SCC.

Results: Prenatal imaging showed SCC in all cases (n = 42). SCC was limited to rostrum and/or genu and/or splenium in 21 cases, involved body in 16 cases, and was more extensive in 5 cases. Indirect imaging features included typical buffalo horn ventricles (n = 14), septal dysmorphism (n = 14), parallel lateral ventricles (n = 12), and ventriculomegaly (n = 4), as well as atypical features in 5 cases. SCC was associated with interhemispheric cysts and pericallosal lipomas in 3 and 6 cases, respectively. Aneuploidy was found in 2 cases. Normal psychomotor development, mild developmental disorders, and global developmental delay were found in 70, 15, and 15% of our cases, respectively.

Conclusions: SCC should be investigated to look for pericallosal lipoma and typical versus atypical indirect features of corpus callosum agenesis (CCA). Prenatal counselling should be guided by imaging as well as clinical and genetic context. Outcome of patients with SCC was similar to the one presenting with complete CCA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000512953DOI Listing
March 2021