Publications by authors named "M Kamran Ikram"

1,272 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Biogenic Synthesis, Characterization and Antibacterial Potential Evaluation of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Against Escherichia coli.

Nanoscale Res Lett 2021 Sep 20;16(1):148. Epub 2021 Sep 20.

Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore, Punjab, 54000, Pakistan.

The development of resistance against antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections along with the prevalence of medication residues presents significant public health problems globally. Antibiotic-resistant germs result in infections that are difficult or impossible to treat. Decreasing antibiotic effectiveness calls for rapid development of alternative antimicrobials. In this respect, nanoparticles (NPs) of copper oxide (CuO) manifest a latent and flexible inorganic nanostructure with noteworthy antimicrobial impact. Green synthesis of CuO NPs was performed in the current study, which was then doped with varying amounts of ginger (Zingiber officinale, ZO) and garlic (Allium sativum, AS) extracts. In low and high doses, the synthesized compound was used to measure the antimicrobial effectiveness against pathogenic Escherichia coli. The present research successfully demonstrated a renewable, eco-friendly synthesis technique with natural materials that is equally applicable to other green metal oxide NPs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s11671-021-03605-zDOI Listing
September 2021

Adiponectin, leptin and resistin and the risk of dementia.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2021 Sep 15. Epub 2021 Sep 15.

Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Adipokines are hormones secreted by adipose tissue with roles in energy homeostasis and regulation of metabolism. Their dysregulation is suggested to contribute to the increased risk of dementia seen with midlife obesity, but longitudinal studies investigating this are scarce. We determined the association between plasma levels of adiponectin, leptin and resistin with the risk of dementia.

Methods: We performed a case-cohort study embedded in the prospective, population-based Rotterdam Study. Plasma levels of the adiponectin, leptin and resistin were measured at baseline (1997-1999) in a random sub-cohort of 945 participants without dementia, and additionally in 177 participants, who were diagnosed with dementia during follow-up (until January 1, 2018).

Results: Higher levels of leptin and resistin were associated with a decreased risk of dementia (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] per SD increase of log transformed values: 0.85 [0.72-1.00] for leptin; 0.82 [0.71-0.95] for resistin). The association of leptin with dementia was further modified by body mass index and by APOE ε4 carrier status. Adiponectin levels were not associated with the risk of dementia.

Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that adipokines have a role in the pathophysiology of dementia. Future studies are warranted to confirm the findings and to explore the underlying mechanisms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glab267DOI Listing
September 2021

Determinants and Reference Ranges of Serum Immunoglobulins in Middle-Aged and Elderly Individuals: a Population-Based Study.

J Clin Immunol 2021 Sep 10. Epub 2021 Sep 10.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy & Clinical Immunology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Purpose: In clinical practice, currently one reference range for serum immunoglobulin (Ig) A, G, and M is applied to all adults, although various factors may influence Ig serum levels. Population-based data on determinants of IgA, IgG, and IgM and recommendations for subgroup specific reference ranges are lacking. We aimed to provide an overview of determinants of IgA, IgG, and IgM in community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly individuals and explore determinants that influence Ig reference ranges.

Methods: Within the Rotterdam Study, we performed linear regression analyses for the association of demographic, lifestyle, and cardiovascular factors with serum IgA, IgG, and IgM. We furthermore calculated Ig reference ranges (based on percentiles), both overall and within relevant subgroups.

Results: We included 8768 participants (median age 62 years). IgA and IgG increased non-linearly with higher age (P < .0001 for both). Women had lower IgA (beta: - 0.24; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: - 0.29; - 0.20) and IgG (beta: - 0.33; 95% CI: - 0.44; - 0.23), but higher IgM levels (beta: 0.08; 95% CI: 0.04;0.13) than men. Former and particularly current smoking were associated with lower IgA and IgG (betas between - 0.07 and - 1.03). Higher alcohol consumption was associated with lower IgG (beta for heavy drinking: - 0.70; 95% CI: - 0.91; - 0.48). Corticosteroid use was associated with lower IgG (beta: - 1.12; 95% CI: - 1.58; - 0.66). Associations with cardiovascular factors were heterogeneous and differed between sexes.

Conclusion: Age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, corticosteroid use, and cardiovascular factors are determinants that should be considered when interpreting serum Ig levels in middle-aged and elderly individuals and may require adjusted reference ranges.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-021-01120-5DOI Listing
September 2021

Deciphering the Potential Neuroprotective Effects of Luteolin against Aβ--Induced Alzheimer's Disease.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Sep 3;22(17). Epub 2021 Sep 3.

Division of Life Science and Applied Life Science (BK21 Four), College of Natural Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea.

The current study was undertaken to unveil the protective effects of Luteolin, a natural flavonoid, against amyloid-beta (Aβ-)-induced neuroinflammation, amyloidogenesis, and synaptic dysfunction in mice. For the development of an AD mouse model, amyloid-beta (Aβ-, 5 μL/5 min/mouse) oligomers were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) into mice's brain by using a stereotaxic frame. After that, the mice were treated with Luteolin for two weeks at a dose of 80 mg/kg/day. To monitor the biochemical changes, we conducted western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. According to our findings, the infusion of amyloid-beta activated c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) in the cortex and hippocampus of the experimental mice; these changes were significantly inhibited in Aβ- + Luteolin-treated mice. Likewise, we also checked the expression of inflammatory markers, such as p-nuclear factor-kB p65 (p-NF-kB p65 (Ser536), tissue necrosis factor (TNF-α), and Interleukin1-β (IL-1β), in Aβ--injected mice brain, which was attenuated in Aβ- + Luteolin-treated mice brains. Further, we investigated the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic cell death markers such as Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, and Cox-2, which was significantly reduced in Aβ- + Lut-treated mice brains compared to the brains of the Aβ-injected group. The results also indicated that with the administration of Aβ-, the expression levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE-1) and amyloid-beta (Aβ-) were significantly enhanced, while they were reduced in Aβ- + Luteolin-treated mice. We also checked the expression of synaptic markers such as PSD-95 and SNAP-25, which was significantly enhanced in Aβ- + Lut-treated mice. To unveil the underlying factors responsible for the protective effects of Luteolin against AD, we used a specific JNK inhibitor, which suggested that Luteolin reduced Aβ-associated neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration via inhibition of JNK. Collectively, our results indicate that Luteolin could serve as a novel therapeutic agent against AD-like pathological changes in mice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22179583DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8430819PMC
September 2021

Genomic and phenotypic insights from an atlas of genetic effects on DNA methylation.

Nat Genet 2021 Sep 6;53(9):1311-1321. Epub 2021 Sep 6.

Estonian Genome Center, Institute of Genomics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Characterizing genetic influences on DNA methylation (DNAm) provides an opportunity to understand mechanisms underpinning gene regulation and disease. In the present study, we describe results of DNAm quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analyses on 32,851 participants, identifying genetic variants associated with DNAm at 420,509 DNAm sites in blood. We present a database of >270,000 independent mQTLs, of which 8.5% comprise long-range (trans) associations. Identified mQTL associations explain 15-17% of the additive genetic variance of DNAm. We show that the genetic architecture of DNAm levels is highly polygenic. Using shared genetic control between distal DNAm sites, we constructed networks, identifying 405 discrete genomic communities enriched for genomic annotations and complex traits. Shared genetic variants are associated with both DNAm levels and complex diseases, but only in a minority of cases do these associations reflect causal relationships from DNAm to trait or vice versa, indicating a more complex genotype-phenotype map than previously anticipated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00923-xDOI Listing
September 2021
-->