Publications by authors named "M Jeeva Sankar"

300 Publications

Stepwise interventions for improving hand hygiene compliance in a level 3 academic neonatal intensive care unit in north India.

J Perinatol 2021 Jul 28. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Newborn Health Knowledge Centre (NHKC) and WHO Collaborating Centre for Training and Research in Newborn Care, Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, 110029, India.

Objective: We evaluated effect of sequentially introducing four WHO-recommended interventions to promote hand-hygiene compliance in tertiary-care NICU.

Study Design: Four dedicated research nurses directly observed doctors and nurses to record success in hand-hygiene opportunities at randomly selected NICU beds and randomly sampled time-slots in four phases (of 4-weeks each): I-Baseline, II-Self-directed learning; III-Participatory learning; IV-Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV); and V-CCTV-plus (with feedback).

Findings: Hand-hygiene compliance changed from 61.8% (baseline) to 77% (end) with overall relative change: 24.6% (95% CI 18, 32; p value= 0.003); compared with preceding phase, relative changes of 21% (15, 28; <0.001), 4% (0, 8; 0.008), -10% (-13, -6; <0.001), and 10% (5, 15; <0.001) during phases II, III, IV, and V, respectively were observed. Rise in hand-hygiene compliance was higher for after-WHO-moments (12.7%; upto 2.5-folds for moment 5, <0.001) compared to before-WHO-moments (5.2%). Educational interventions, feedback and monitoring WHO moments can improve hand-hygiene compliance significantly among health-care providers in NICU.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41372-021-01141-3DOI Listing
July 2021

Screening of Natural Phytocompounds Towards Identification of Potential Lead Compounds to Treat COVID-19.

Front Mol Biosci 2021 5;8:637122. Epub 2021 Jul 5.

Bioscience Research Foundation, Chennai, India.

COVID-19 is one of the members of the coronavirus family that can easily assail humans. As of now, 10 million people are infected and above two million people have died from COVID-19 globally. Over the past year, several researchers have made essential advances in discovering potential drugs. Up to now, no efficient drugs are available on the market. The present study aims to identify the potent phytocompounds from different medicinal plants (, , , , and ). In total, 227 phytocompounds were identified and screened against the proteins S-ACE2 and M through structure-based virtual screening approaches. Based on the binding affinity score, 30 active phytocompounds were selected. Amongst, the binding affinity for beta-sitosterol and beta-elemene against S-ACE2 showed -12.0 and -10.9 kcal/mol, respectively. Meanwhile, the binding affinity for beta-sitosterol and beta-chlorogenin against M was found to be -9.7 and -8.4 kcal/mol, respectively. Further, the selected compounds proceeded with molecular dynamics simulation, prime MM-GBSA analysis, and ADME/T property checks to understand the stability, interaction, conformational changes, binding free energy, and pharmaceutical relevant parameters. Moreover, the hotspot residues such as Lys31 and Lys353 for S-ACE2 and catalytic dyad His41 and Cys145 for M were actively involved in the inhibition of viral entry. From the in silico analyses, we anticipate that this work could be valuable to ongoing novel drug discovery with potential treatment for COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmolb.2021.637122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8288047PMC
July 2021

Combined morphological and proteome profiling reveals target-independent impairment of cholesterol homeostasis.

Cell Chem Biol 2021 Jun 29. Epub 2021 Jun 29.

Max-Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Department of Chemical Biology, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 11, Dortmund 44227, Germany; Technical University Dortmund, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 6, Dortmund 44227, Germany. Electronic address:

Unbiased profiling approaches are powerful tools for small-molecule target or mode-of-action deconvolution as they generate a holistic view of the bioactivity space. This is particularly important for non-protein targets that are difficult to identify with commonly applied target identification methods. Thereby, unbiased profiling can enable identification of novel bioactivity even for annotated compounds. We report the identification of a large bioactivity cluster comprised of numerous well-characterized drugs with different primary targets using a combination of the morphological Cell Painting Assay and proteome profiling. Cluster members alter cholesterol homeostasis and localization due to their physicochemical properties that lead to protonation and accumulation in lysosomes, an increase in lysosomal pH, and a disturbed cholesterol homeostasis. The identified cluster enables identification of modulators of cholesterol homeostasis and links regulation of genes or proteins involved in cholesterol synthesis or trafficking to physicochemical properties rather than to nominal targets.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2021.06.003DOI Listing
June 2021

Milking of Umbilical Cord vs Delayed Cord Clamping: Authors' Reply.

Indian Pediatr 2021 Jun;58(6):593

Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2021

Aqueous chlorhexidine 1% versus 2% for neonatal skin antisepsis: a randomised non-inferiority trial.

Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2021 Jun 9. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Objective: To evaluate whether 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) when compared with 2% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate is non-inferior for neonatal skin antisepsis.

Design: Parallel, blinded, non-inferiority randomised trial.

Setting: Level III, academic, neonatal intensive care unit.

Patients: Infants born at 26 to 42 weeks of gestation from June 2019 to December 2019.

Interventions: Participants were randomised to skin antisepsis by either 1% aqueous CHG or 2% aqueous CHG.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was the proportion of negative skin swab cultures after skin antisepsis. Secondary outcomes were local skin reactions at 0, 6, 12 and 24 hours and plasma chlorhexidine levels in a subset of the study population.

Results: A total of 308 neonates with a median gestation age of 34 (31-37) weeks and mean birth weight of 2029 g were randomised on 685 occasions (1% CHG: n=341; 2% CHG: n=344). 93.0% of the post-antisepsis skin swabs were sterile in 1% CHG group compared with 95.6% of the swabs in the 2% CHG group (risk difference -2.7%, 95% CI -6.2% to +0.8%). The lower bound of 95% CI crossed the pre-specified absolute non-inferiority limit of 5%. Neonates developed mild dermatitis on 16 (2.3%) occasions. There was no significant difference in median plasma CHG levels in the two groups, 19.6 (12.5-36.4) and 12.6 (8.7-26.6) ng/mL, respectively.

Conclusions: Application of 1% aqueous CHG was not shown to be non-inferior to 2% chlorhexidine aqueous for skin antisepsis in neonates. There were no severe skin-related adverse events in either of the two groups.

Trial Registration Number: CTRI/2019/06/019822; (http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/pmaindet2.php?trialid=33453&EncHid=&userName=CTRI/2019/06/019822).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2020-321174DOI Listing
June 2021
-->