Publications by authors named "M Estela Rubio Gozalbo"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessment of the Nutritional Status, Diet and Intestinal Parasites in Hosted Saharawi Children.

Children (Basel) 2020 Nov 29;7(12). Epub 2020 Nov 29.

Parasites and Health Research Group, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology and Parasitology, University of Valencia, 46100 Burjassot, Spain.

Since the early 1990s, Spanish humanitarian associations have welcomed Saharawi children from the refugee camps in Tindouf (Argelia). These children are the most affected by the lack of food, water, hygienic measures and health care. The main objective of this study was to analyze the anthropometric, nutritional and parasitological data of 38 Saharawi boys and girls (from 10 to 13 years old) under a holiday host program in the city of Valencia. Our results confirm that malnutrition and multiparasitism are highly frequent, so it is understood that living conditions in refugee camps continue to be precarious with a lack of proper hygiene and nutrition. Furthermore, biochemical alterations, lactose malabsorption and the risk of celiac disease, also detected in our study as a secondary objective, will complicate nutritional management and restoration of health. For this reason, sustainable feeding alternatives and interventions from a hygienic and nutritional point of view are proposed, emphasizing in an improvement in the education of parents and children.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/children7120264DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7760248PMC
November 2020

and Fructose Malabsorption: A Frequent Association.

Nutrients 2019 Dec 5;11(12). Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Joint Research Unit on Endocrinology, Nutrition and Clinical Dietetics, University of Valencia-Health Research Institute La Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain.

Nowadays, scientific studies are emerging on the possible etiological role of intestinal parasites in functional digestive disorders. Our study was carried out with healthy individuals (control group; = 82) and symptomatic patients with lactose or fructose malabsorption, including positive (malabsorbers; = 213) and negative (absorbers; = 56) breath test, being analyzed for the presence of intestinal parasites. A high parasitic prevalence was observed in malabsorbers (41.8%), exclusively due to single-cell eukaryotes but not helminths. was the predominant parasite in cases of abnormal absorption (26.5%), significantly associated with fructose malabsorption and doubling the probability of developing this pathology. Within controls, sp. (13.4%) was almost the only parasite, being the second among patients (12.6%), and , the last species of clinical relevance, was detected exclusively in two malabsorbers (0.9%). The consumption of ecological food and professions with direct contact with humans arose as risk factors of parasitism. A diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption in adulthood is the starting point, making the search for the primary cause necessary. Accurate parasitological diagnosis should be considered another tool in the clinical routine for patients with recurrent symptoms, since their condition may be reversible with adequate therapeutic intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu11122973DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6950212PMC
December 2019

Blastocystis subtypes and their association with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Med Hypotheses 2018 Jul 13;116:4-9. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Area of Parasitology, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology and Parasitology, University of Valencia, Spain; Joint Research Unit on Endocrinology, Nutrition and Clinical Dietetics, University of Valencia-Health Research Institute La Fe, Spain. Electronic address:

Blastocystis spp. is a common intestinal protozoan that affects humans and animals. The role of this parasite as a pathogen is still controversial and it is suspected to be linked to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain associated with altered intestinal habits. A broad search in electronic databases, libraries, portals of journals, etc. for reports on the association between the parasite and IBS without language restriction was performed. The selection was not restricted by date, but articles published in the last seven years were given preference. We investigated the evidence regarding Blastocystis and IBS coexistence as well as the implications of the parasite in pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. Only standardized parasitological tools, supplemented by epidemiological analysis, will be able to clarify whether parasite carriage could be connected to IBS and its status as a human pathogen. Although a variation in pathogenicity and virulence between subtypes has been confirmed, Blastocystis can only be considered an indicator of dysbiosis. Accurate diagnoses of this parasitic eukaryote, specifically at genotypic and phenotypic levels, as well as the complete analysis of the intestinal microbial communities, have to be included in the protocol of those patients with IBS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2018.04.006DOI Listing
July 2018

Enteroparasites in Preschool Children on the Pacific Region of Nicaragua.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2018 02 14;98(2):570-575. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia, Spain.

The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the prevalence of enteroparasites in preschool children originating from the seven departments of the Pacific region in Nicaragua. One stool sample of each of 1,217 children, from 6 months to 5 years of age, was collected and personal data were recorded on delivery of the container. Samples fixed in 10% formalin were processed by a formol-acetate concentration and a modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique. The overall prevalence of enteroparasite infections was 68.2% with a total of at least 20 species. (45.5%), (31.7%), (8.2%), and (5.2%) were the most prevalent protozoa and helminth species in the total study as well as in all departments. Protozoan prevalence presented a statistically significant difference by gender (male: 69.6%; female: 46.7%; < 0.001), and males presented a higher infection rate than females (male: 9.9%; female 6.4%; < 0.035). Protozoan prevalence increased with age with a statistically significant difference ( < 0.001). Helminths were always more prevalent in urban areas ( < 0.0002). Protozoan infections result statistically higher than helminth infections so that water-based transmission could be suspected. Based on the differences with respect to species and parasite prevalence between the seven departments in the Pacific region of Nicaragua, the exploration of local factors associated with the transmission of enteroparasites should also be considered to reduce infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0551DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5929200PMC
February 2018

Interactions related to non-host snails in the host-finding process of Euparyphium albuferensis and Echinostoma friedi (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) miracidia.

Parasitol Res 2003 Nov 16;91(5):353-6. Epub 2003 Sep 16.

Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Vicente Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot-Valencia, Spain.

In order to determine whether the miracidia of Euparyphium albuferensis and Echinostoma friedi are sensitive to their host snail (HS) and capable of discriminating between HS and non-host snails (NHS), or whether these NHS can interfere and thus reduce the infection rates (decoy effect), a total of three experiments were conducted with HS, NHS and snail-conditioned water (SCW). Gyraulus chinensis is the HS for E. albuferensis miracidia, while Physa acuta, Radix peregra and Lymnaea fuscus are considered NHS. For E. friedi miracidia R. peregra, G. chinensis and L. fuscus are the HS, while P. acuta is the NHS. The NHS R. peregra produces the greatest decoy effect on Euparyphium albuferensis miracidia, while R. peregra, as the HS of Echinostoma friedi miracidia, is always subject to a NHS decoy effect. However, an increase in E. friedi miracidia infectivity is observed in its HS G. chinensis, in the presence of SCW of P. acuta. These experimental results might explain the low prevalence of snails infected with E. albuferensis miracidia in their natural habitat.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-003-0968-5DOI Listing
November 2003