Publications by authors named "M E Turner"

4,372 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Longitudinal effects of cigarette pictorial warning labels among young adults.

J Behav Med 2021 Sep 23. Epub 2021 Sep 23.

Department of Internal Medicine, Wexner Medical Center, Center for Tobacco Research, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

Young adults are influenced by cigarette package marketing. Pictorial warning labels are a recommended intervention. Evidence demonstrates pictorial warnings impact negative emotion, risk perceptions, and motivation to quit smoking, but there is limited research on their effects over time. This study analyzes data from a randomized trial of young adult smokers (N = 229) exposed to a pictorial or text-only cigarette warning. We assessed changes in fear, anger, risk perceptions, and motivation to quit smoking after 4 weeks using latent change score modeling and over 3 months using latent growth modeling. Latent change results showed exposure was associated with increases in fear, anger, and motivation to quit after 4 weeks. Latent growth showed exposure was associated with increases in motivation to quit smoking over 3 months, but not other outcomes. Findings suggest pictorial warning labels produce an emotional response and increase motivation to quit among young adult smokers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-021-00258-2DOI Listing
September 2021

Conversations About Children When an Important Adult Is at End of Life: An Audit.

Am J Hosp Palliat Care 2021 Sep 19:10499091211046241. Epub 2021 Sep 19.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Purpose: Health and social care professionals report it challenging to have conversations with families when an important adult in the life of a child is at end of life, often feeling this aspect of care is the responsibility of other colleagues. This study aimed to understand professionals' perceived role in family-centered conversations as part of routine care at end of life, and how to promote this element of care in clinical practice.

Methods: An audit was completed with 116 professionals who work in palliative care including doctors and nurses that attended a 2-day virtual congress.

Results: Professionals (73.2%) felt confident about starting a conversation with adult patients at end of life about important children. However, enquiring about relationships with children was largely dependent on the age of the patient. 64.7% of respondents reported signposting families to websites and services that provide family support. Most professionals (76.7%) wanted training to equip them with the skills and confidence to having family-centered conversations at end of life, with videos demonstrating how to provide these elements of care the most preferred option.

Conclusions: Short training resources should be developed to equip professionals with the necessary skills toward having conversations about children with patients and relatives in clinical appointments. There is a need for professionals to ask every patient about important relationships with children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10499091211046241DOI Listing
September 2021

Collaborative learning in the professional development of medical radiation practitioners.

J Med Radiat Sci 2021 Sep 18. Epub 2021 Sep 18.

Discipline of Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

Introduction: Medical radiation practitioners (MRPs) participate in continuous professional development (CPD) to update their knowledge, skills, safety standards and patient care. The Medical Radiation Practice Board of Australia (MRPBA) recommends that practitioners participate in a variety of activities and to incorporate the use of collaborative learning tools. The aim of this research was to investigate the value, use and workplace supports for online and face-to-face collaborative learning for CPD.

Methods: A cross-sectional online survey of Australian MRPs was conducted. The questionnaire was distributed via e-blast from the Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy (ASMIRT) to members.

Results: A total of 115 completed questionnaires were received. Seminars, workshops and conferences were the most valued collaborative learning tools, with no significant difference in ranking observed (P > 0.05). The majority of MRPs regularly attend conferences (64%, n = 73) with those working in a metropolitan location more likely to attend. MRPs are supported by their workplace to attend conferences through the provision of paid leave (61%, n = 63), funding (50%, n = 52) and to a lesser extent travel expense (38%, n = 39). More than half (60%, n = 69) of the participants use social media for CPD with Facebook being the most frequently used and most useful online platform. The most common reasons for using social media for CPD were accessibility to information (85%, n = 56), little geographical limitations (77%, n = 51) and ease of use (74%, n = 49).

Conclusion: Medical radiation practitioners currently utilise both face-to-face and online collaborative learning tools to meet their CPD needs. Face-to-face tools are more frequently utilised and highly valued by MRPs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmrs.548DOI Listing
September 2021

Higher blood high density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein A1 levels are associated with reduced risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2021 Sep 13. Epub 2021 Sep 13.

Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Background: Premorbid body mass index, physical activity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease have been associated with an altered risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). There is evidence of shared genetic risk between ALS and lipid metabolism. A very large prospective longitudinal population cohort permits the study of a range of metabolic parameters and the risk of subsequent diagnosis of ALS.

Methods: The risk of subsequent ALS diagnosis in those enrolled prospectively to the UK Biobank (n=502 409) was examined in relation to baseline levels of blood high and low density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL), total cholesterol, total cholesterol:HDL ratio, apolipoproteins A1 and B (apoA1, apoB), triglycerides, glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and creatinine, plus self-reported exercise and body mass index.

Results: Controlling for age and sex, higher HDL (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.96, p=0.010) and apoA1 (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.94, p=0.005) were associated with a reduced risk of ALS. Higher total cholesterol:HDL was associated with an increased risk of ALS (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.31, p=0.006). In models incorporating multiple metabolic markers, higher LDL or apoB was associated with an increased risk of ALS, in addition to a lower risk with higher HDL or apoA. Coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease and increasing age were also associated with an increased risk of ALS.

Conclusions: The association of HDL, apoA1 and LDL levels with risk of ALS contributes to an increasing body of evidence that the premorbid metabolic landscape may play a role in pathogenesis. Understanding the molecular basis for these changes will inform presymptomatic biomarker development and therapeutic targeting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2021-327133DOI Listing
September 2021
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