Publications by authors named "M Di Girolamo"

245 Publications

Biologic Therapies and Small Molecules for the Management of Non-Infectious Scleritis: A Narrative Review.

Ophthalmol Ther 2021 Sep 2. Epub 2021 Sep 2.

Ophthalmology Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Scleritis refers to a wide spectrum of ocular conditions ranging from mild to sight-threatening scleral inflammation that may compromise visual function and threaten the anatomical integrity of the ocular globe. Most aggressive forms like necrotizing or posterior scleritis are often difficult-to-treat cases, refractory to conventional treatment. The association with systemic diseases, namely rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and relapsing polychondritis, may have prognostic implications as well. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of ocular inflammatory diseases have paved the way to more effective and targeted treatment approaches. In this regard, a growing body of evidence supports the potential role of biologic agents in the management of non-infectious scleral inflammation, either idiopathic or in a background of immune-mediated systemic disorders. Biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 inhibitors as well as CD20 blockade have displayed promising results. More specifically, several studies have reported their ability to control scleral inflammation, reduce the overall scleritis relapses, and allow a glucocorticoid-sparing effect while being generally well tolerated. Anecdotal reports have also been described with other biologic agents including abatacept, ustekinumab, daclizumab, and alemtuzumab as well as targeted small molecules such as tofacitinib. Further studies are warranted to fully elucidate the role of biologic agents in non-infectious scleritis and investigate specific areas with the aim to administer treatments in the context of personalized medicine. This review summarizes the available data regarding clinical trials, small pilot studies, and real-life experience of the last two decades reporting the use of biologic agents in the management of non-infectious scleritis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40123-021-00393-8DOI Listing
September 2021

Endodontic retreatment and bioceramics: A case report.

J Biol Regul Homeost Agents 2021 May-Jun;35(3 Suppl. 1):147-153

Department of Social Dentistry and Gnathological Rehabilitation, National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty (NIHMP), Rome, Italy.

The success rate in endodontic retreatment can be significantly boosted by using materials that guarantee both intimate adhesion to the canal walls and long-term stability. Bioceramic cements used in root filling show interesting properties including extraordinary sealing capacities, antimicrobial activity that stimulates periapical healing and the continuous production of hydroxyopathitis for a long time. This case report deals with the application of bioceramic cement in endodontic retreatment. The Bioroot RCS (Septodont), thanks to its ability to firmly adhere both to the gutta-percha and to the walls of the canal and to definitively seal the apical third, can allow to obtain extraordinary healing in a relatively short time by exploiting its antimicrobial abilities. However, further studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of this technique over the long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23812/21-3supp1-17DOI Listing
July 2021

Guided sinus lift: virtual planning of surgical templates for lateral access.

J Biol Regul Homeost Agents 2021 May-Jun;35(3 Suppl. 1):139-145

Department of Social Dentistry and Gnathological Rehabilitation, National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty (NIHMP), Rome, Italy.

The sinus lift with lateral approach is a regenerative technique nowadays considered predictable to increase the height of bone in the atrophic posterior maxilla. Knowledge of sinus anatomy and evaluation of risk factors are the basis of regenerative and rehabilitative surgical success. The positioning and size of the lateral antrostomy represent critical factors in the execution of regenerative surgery, due to the difficulty in transferring radiological information to the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus even for skilled surgeons. The knowhow of guided implant surgery in recent years is also finding use in planning and precisely delineating the lateral access to the maxillary sinus using CBCT imaging and dimensional reconstruction software, through the realization of surgical guides with 3D printing, as shown in the presented case.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23812/21-3supp1-16DOI Listing
July 2021

Critical investigation of the pre-surgical anatomic factors that influence the aesthetic result in post-extractive implantology and immediate prosthetic.

J Biol Regul Homeost Agents 2021 May-Jun;35(3 Suppl. 1):127-137

Private Practice, Rome, Italy.

The aesthetic goals of implant dentistry should be similar to those of conventional prostheses. In implant-prosthetic rehabilitations of the anterior sectors, the quantity and quality of hard and soft tissue play a fundamental role in achieving the desired aesthetics and in integrating the restoration in a complete and harmonious way into the existing anterior dentition. Post-extraction implantology is a treatment option for implant therapy after the extraction of a single tooth in the anterior jaw. This article presents some key factors to analyze and follow in order to achieve a predictable and acceptable aesthetic result. The creation of a predictable peri-implant aesthetics requires adequate preservation of the bone and soft tissues around the teeth that will be extracted and a correct positioning of the 3D implant. Furthermore, aesthetic success requires the creation of a correct transmucosal path, during the provisional prosthetic phases, which must be replicated and maintained with the definitive crowns.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23812/21-3supp1-15DOI Listing
July 2021

Ocular Involvement in Hereditary Amyloidosis.

Genes (Basel) 2021 Jun 22;12(7). Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Amyloidosis Research and Treatment Centre, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

The term amyloidosis describes a group of rare diseases caused by protein conformation abnormalities resulting in extracellular deposition and accumulation of insoluble fibrillar aggregates. So far, 36 amyloid precursor proteins have been identified, and each one is responsible for a specific disease entity. Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRv) is one of the most common forms of systemic and ocular amyloidosis, due to the deposition of transthyretin (TTR), which is a transport protein mainly synthesized in the liver but also in the retinal pigment epithelial cells. ATTRv amyloidosis may be misdiagnosed with several other conditions, resulting in a significant diagnostic delay. Gelsolin and keratoepithelin are other proteins that, when mutated, are responsible for a systemic amyloid disease with significant ocular manifestations that not infrequently appear before systemic involvement. The main signs of ocular amyloid deposition are in the cornea, irido-corneal angle and vitreous, causing complications related to vasculopathy and neuropathy at the local level. This review aims at describing the main biochemical, histopathological and clinical features of systemic amyloidosis associated with eye involvement, with particular emphasis on the inherited forms. We discuss currently available treatments, focusing on ocular involvement and specific ophthalmologic management and highlighting the importance of a prompt treatment for the potential sight-threatening complications derived from amyloid deposition in ocular tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12070955DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8304974PMC
June 2021
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