Publications by authors named "M D Miller"

13,808 Publications

Communal mastery and associations with depressive and PTSD symptomatology among urban trauma-exposed women.

Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol 2021 Jul 22. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

STAR: Stress, Anxiety & Resilience Consultants.

Racial and ethnic minority women from low-resource urban communities experience disproportionately high rates of trauma exposure. Higher rates of lifetime trauma exposure are strongly associated with subsequent psychological sequela, specifically depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Communal mastery is the ability to cope with challenges and achieve goals by being closely interconnected with friends, family, and significant others. Yet, it is unknown if communal mastery is protective specifically against PTSD and depressive symptoms. Participants ( = 131) were Black and Latina women (88.5% Black, mean monthly income: < $750) recruited from an urban outpatient obstetric-gynecological clinic at an academic medical center. Participants completed an online questionnaire that assessed trauma history, PTSD and depressive symptoms, types of individualistic coping, social support, and communal mastery. Hierarchical multiple regression models demonstrated that communal mastery is uniquely associated with fewer PTSD symptoms (β = -.23, = .003). More severe trauma history, more use of passive coping skills, and poorer social support were also significantly associated with PTSD symptoms, explaining over half of the variance in PTSD symptoms. Although significantly correlated, communal mastery was not uniquely associated with fewer depressive symptoms (β = -.13, = .201). These findings suggest that connectedness as assessed through communal mastery serves as an important shield against the effects of traumatic stress for Black and Latina women. Future research would benefit by exploring interventions that aim to increase communal mastery in order to help highly trauma-exposed racial and ethnic minority women in low-resource environments. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000473DOI Listing
July 2021

Real time remote symptom monitoring during chemotherapy for cancer: European multicentre randomised controlled trial (eSMART).

BMJ 2021 07 21;374:n1647. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Population Health and Genomics, Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

Objective: To evaluate effects of remote monitoring of adjuvant chemotherapy related side effects via the Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) on symptom burden, quality of life, supportive care needs, anxiety, self-efficacy, and work limitations.

Design: Multicentre, repeated measures, parallel group, evaluator masked, stratified randomised controlled trial.

Setting: Twelve cancer centres in Austria, Greece, Norway, Republic of Ireland, and UK.

Participants: 829 patients with non-metastatic breast cancer, colorectal cancer, Hodgkin's disease, or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma receiving first line adjuvant chemotherapy or chemotherapy for the first time in five years.

Intervention: Patients were randomised to ASyMS (intervention; n=415) or standard care (control; n=414) over six cycles of chemotherapy.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was symptom burden (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale; MSAS). Secondary outcomes were health related quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General; FACT-G), Supportive Care Needs Survey Short-Form (SCNS-SF34), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Revised (STAI-R), Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy scale for cancer (CASE-Cancer), and work limitations questionnaire (WLQ).

Results: For the intervention group, symptom burden remained at pre-chemotherapy treatment levels, whereas controls reported an increase from cycle 1 onwards (least squares absolute mean difference -0.15, 95% confidence interval -0.19 to -0.12; P<0.001; Cohen's D effect size=0.5). Analysis of MSAS sub-domains indicated significant reductions in favour of ASyMS for global distress index (-0.21, -0.27 to -0.16; P<0.001), psychological symptoms (-0.16, -0.23 to -0.10; P<0.001), and physical symptoms (-0.21, -0.26 to -0.17; P<0.001). FACT-G scores were higher in the intervention group across all cycles (mean difference 4.06, 95% confidence interval 2.65 to 5.46; P<0.001), whereas mean scores for STAI-R trait (-1.15, -1.90 to -0.41; P=0.003) and STAI-R state anxiety (-1.13, -2.06 to -0.20; P=0.02) were lower. CASE-Cancer scores were higher in the intervention group (mean difference 0.81, 0.19 to 1.43; P=0.01), and most SCNS-SF34 domains were lower, including sexuality needs (-1.56, -3.11 to -0.01; P<0.05), patient care and support needs (-1.74, -3.31 to -0.16; P=0.03), and physical and daily living needs (-2.8, -5.0 to -0.6; P=0.01). Other SCNS-SF34 domains and WLQ were not significantly different. Safety of ASyMS was satisfactory. Neutropenic events were higher in the intervention group.

Conclusions: Significant reduction in symptom burden supports the use of ASyMS for remote symptom monitoring in cancer care. A "medium" Cohen's effect size of 0.5 showed a sizable, positive clinical effect of ASyMS on patients' symptom experiences. Remote monitoring systems will be vital for future services, particularly with blended models of care delivery arising from the covid-19 pandemic.

Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02356081.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1647DOI Listing
July 2021

Opioid-related risk perceptions in chronic pain: influence of patient gender and prior misuse behaviors.

Pain 2021 Jul 16. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Psychology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida.

Abstract: Little is known about the factors that influence providers' perceptions of patient risk for aberrant opioid use. Patient gender may interact with prior opioid misuse to influence these perceptions. We asked 131 physicians to view videos and vignettes for 8 virtual patients with chronic pain. Gender (male/female) and previous prescription opioid misuse (present/absent) varied across patients; the vignettes were otherwise balanced on demographic and clinical characteristics. For each patient, providers assessed four risk domains: opioid-related adverse events, opioid misuse/abuse, opioid addiction, and opioid diversion. Results indicated a significant gender-by-misuse interaction for risk of opioid misuse/abuse. When previous misuse behaviors were absent, providers rated men at higher risk; there was no gender difference when previous misuse behaviors were present. A significant gender-by-misuse interaction was found for risk of opioid-related adverse events. Providers perceived men to be higher risk when previous misuse behaviors were absent; there was no gender difference when previous misuse behaviors were present. A significant gender-by-misuse interaction was found for risk of opioid addiction. Providers rated women at higher risk when previous misuse behaviors were present, and men at higher risk when previous misuse behaviors were absent. There were significant main effects of gender and misuse for risk of opioid diversion. Providers rated men and those with previous misuse behaviors at higher risk. These results demonstrate that patient gender and previous opioid misuse have unique and interactive effects on provider perceptions of prescription opioid-related risks. Studies are needed to identify the mechanisms underlying these effects, such as gender-based stereotypes about risk-taking and drug abuse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002412DOI Listing
July 2021

International Guidelines for Veterinary Tumor Pathology: A Call to Action.

Vet Pathol 2021 Jul 20:3009858211013712. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Deceased.

Standardization of tumor assessment lays the foundation for validation of grading systems, permits reproducibility of oncologic studies among investigators, and increases confidence in the significance of study results. Currently, there is minimal methodological standardization for assessing tumors in veterinary medicine, with few attempts to validate published protocols and grading schemes. The current article attempts to address these shortcomings by providing standard guidelines for tumor assessment parameters and protocols for evaluating specific tumor types. More detailed information is available in the Supplemental Files, the intention of which is 2-fold: publication as part of this commentary, but more importantly, these will be available as "living documents" on a website (www.vetcancerprotocols.org), which will be updated as new information is presented in the peer-reviewed literature. Our hope is that veterinary pathologists will agree that this initiative is needed, and will contribute to and utilize this information for routine diagnostic work and oncologic studies. Journal editors and reviewers can utilize checklists to ensure publications include sufficient detail and standardized methods of tumor assessment. To maintain the relevance of the guidelines and protocols, it is critical that the information is periodically updated and revised as new studies are published and validated with the intent of providing a repository of this information. Our hope is that this initiative (a continuation of efforts published in this journal in 2011) will facilitate collaboration and reproducibility between pathologists and institutions, increase case numbers, and strengthen clinical research findings, thus ensuring continued progress in veterinary oncologic pathology and improving patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/03009858211013712DOI Listing
July 2021

Differing susceptibility of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice-parents of the murine BXD family, to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

Cell Biosci 2021 Jul 19;11(1):137. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Department of Genetics, Genomics and Informatics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, 38163, USA.

The ongoing coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by a novel coronavirus termed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) that is closely related to SARS-CoV, poses a grave threat to global health and has devastated societies worldwide. One puzzling aspect of COVID-19 is the impressive variation in disease manifestations among infected individuals, from a majority who are asymptomatic or exhibit mild symptoms to a smaller, largely age-dependent fraction who develop life-threatening conditions. Some of these differences are likely the consequence of host genetic factors. Systems genetics using diverse and replicable cohorts of isogenic mice represents a powerful way to dissect those host genetic differences that modulate microbial infections. Here we report that the two founders of the large BXD family of mice-C57BL/6J and DBA/2J, differ substantially in their susceptibility to a mouse-adapted SARS-CoV, MA15. Following intranasal viral challenge, DBA/2J develops a more severe disease than C57BL/6J as evidenced by more pronounced and sustained weight loss. Disease was accompanied by high levels of pulmonary viral replication in both strains early after infection but substantially delayed viral clearance in DBA/2J. Our data reveal that the parents of the BXD family are segregated by clear phenotypic differences during MA15 infection and support the feasibility of using this family to systemically dissect the complex virus-host interactions that modulate disease progression and outcome of infection with SARS-CoV, and provisionally also with SARS-CoV-2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13578-021-00656-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8287544PMC
July 2021