Publications by authors named "M Bonet"

276 Publications

Belimumab in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

Lupus 2021 Jul 20:9612033211033989. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Rheumatology Department, Hospital Consorci Sanitari Alt Penedès Garraf (CSAPG), Vilafranca del Penedès, Spain Dermatology Department, Hospital Consorci Sanitari Alt Penedès Garraf (CSAPG), Vilafranca del Penedès, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/09612033211033989DOI Listing
July 2021

Availability of facility resources and services and infection-related maternal outcomes in the WHO Global Maternal Sepsis Study: a cross-sectional study.

Lancet Glob Health 2021 Jul 14. Epub 2021 Jul 14.

Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales (CREP), Rosario, Argentina.

Background: Infections are among the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. The Global Maternal Sepsis and Neonatal Initiative, launched in 2016 by WHO and partners, sought to reduce the burden of maternal infections and sepsis and was the basis upon which the Global Maternal Sepsis Study (GLOSS) was implemented in 2017. In this Article, we aimed to describe the availability of facility resources and services and to analyse their association with maternal outcomes.

Methods: GLOSS was a facility-based, prospective, 1-week inception cohort study implemented in 713 health-care facilities in 52 countries and included 2850 hospitalised pregnant or recently pregnant women with suspected or confirmed infections. All women admitted for or in hospital with suspected or confirmed infections during pregnancy, childbirth, post partum, or post abortion at any of the participating facilities between Nov 28 and Dec 4 were eligible for inclusion. In this study, we included all GLOSS participating facilities that collected facility-level data (446 of 713 facilities). We used data obtained from individual forms completed for each enrolled woman and their newborn babies by trained researchers who checked the medical records and from facility forms completed by hospital administrators for each participating facility. We described facilities according to country income level, compliance with providing core clinical interventions and services according to women's needs and reported availability, and severity of infection-related maternal outcomes. We used a logistic multilevel mixed model for assessing the association between facility characteristics and infection-related maternal outcomes.

Findings: We included 446 facilities from 46 countries that enrolled 2560 women. We found a high availability of most services and resources needed for obstetric care and infection prevention. We found increased odds for severe maternal outcomes among women enrolled during the post-partum or post-abortion period from facilities located in low-income countries (adjusted odds ratio 1·84 [95% CI 1·05-3·22]) and among women enrolled during pregnancy or childbirth from non-urban facilities (adjusted odds ratio 2·44 [1·02-5·85]). Despite compliance being high overall, it was low with regards to measuring respiratory rate (85 [24%] of 355 facilities) and measuring pulse oximetry (184 [57%] of 325 facilities).

Interpretation: While health-care facilities caring for pregnant and recently pregnant women with suspected or confirmed infections have access to a wide range of resources and interventions, worse maternal outcomes are seen among recently pregnant women located in low-income countries than among those in higher-income countries; this trend is similar for pregnant women. Compliance with cost-effective clinical practices and timely care of women with particular individual characteristics can potentially improve infection-related maternal outcomes.

Funding: UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction, WHO, Merck for Mothers, and US Agency for International Development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(21)00248-5DOI Listing
July 2021

Clinical characterization and outcomes of 85 patients with neurosarcoidosis.

Sci Rep 2021 Jul 2;11(1):13735. Epub 2021 Jul 2.

Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain.

To analyze the frequency and clinical phenotype of neurosarcoidosis (NS) in one of the largest nationwide cohorts of patients with sarcoidosis reported from southern Europe. NS was evaluated according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System Sarcoidosis recently proposed by Stern et al. Pathologic confirmation of granulomatous disease was used to subclassify NS into definite (confirmation in neurological tissue), probable (confirmation in extraneurological tissue) and possible (no histopathological confirmation of the disease). Of the 1532 patients included in the cohort, 85 (5.5%) fulfilled the Stern criteria for NS (49 women, mean age at diagnosis of NS of 47.6 years, 91% White). These patients developed 103 neurological conditions involving the brain (38%), cranial nerves (36%), the meninges (3%), the spinal cord (10%) and the peripheral nerves (14%); no patient had concomitant central and peripheral nerve involvements. In 59 (69%) patients, neurological involvement preceded or was present at the time of diagnosis of the disease. According to the classification proposed by Stern et al., 11 (13%) were classified as a definite NS, 61 (72%) as a probable NS and the remaining 13 (15%) as a possible NS. In comparison with the systemic phenotype of patients without NS, patients with CNS involvement presented a lower frequency of thoracic involvement (82% vs 93%, q = 0.018), a higher frequency of ocular (27% vs 10%, q < 0.001) and salivary gland (15% vs 4%, q = 0.002) WASOG involvements. In contrast, patients with PNS involvement showed a higher frequency of liver involvement (36% vs 12%, p = 0.02) in comparison with patients without NS. Neurosarcoidosis was identified in 5.5% of patients. CNS involvement prevails significantly over PNS involvement, and both conditions do not overlap in any patient. The systemic phenotype associated to each involvement was clearly differentiated, and can be helpful not only in the early identification of neurological involvement, but also in the systemic evaluation of patients diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-92967-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8253777PMC
July 2021

Coexistence of immune-mediated diseases in sarcoidosis. Frequency and clinical significance in 1737 patients.

Joint Bone Spine 2021 Jun 8;88(6):105236. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of Medicine, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Autoimmune Diseases, ICMiD, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

Objective: To analyze whether immune-mediated diseases (IMDs) occurs in sarcoidosis more commonly than expected in the general population, and how concomitant IMDs influence the clinical presentation of the disease.

Methods: We searched for coexisting IMDs in patients included in the SARCOGEAS-cohort, a multicenter nationwide database of consecutive patients diagnosed according to the ATS/ESC/WASOG criteria. Comparisons were made considering the presence or absence of IMD clustering, and odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated as the ratio of observed cases of every IMD in the sarcoidosis cohort to the observed cases in the general population.

Results: Among 1737 patients with sarcoidosis, 283 (16%) patients presented at least one associated IMD. These patients were more commonly female (OR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.49-2.62) and were diagnosed with sarcoidosis at an older age (49.6 vs. 47.5years, P<0.05). The frequency of IMDs in patients with sarcoidosis was nearly 2-fold higher than the frequency observed in the general population (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.44-1.86). Significant associations were identified in 17 individual IMDs. In comparison with the general population, the IMDs with the strongest strength of association with sarcoidosis (OR>5) were common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) (OR: 431.8), familial Mediterranean fever (OR 33.9), primary biliary cholangitis (OR: 16.57), haemolytic anemia (OR: 12.17), autoimmune hepatitis (OR: 9.01), antiphospholipid syndrome (OR: 8.70), immune thrombocytopenia (OR: 8.43), Sjögren syndrome (OR: 6.98), systemic sclerosis (OR: 5.71), ankylosing spondylitis (OR: 5.49), IgA deficiency (OR: 5.07) and psoriatic arthritis (OR: 5.06). Sex-adjusted ORs were considerably higher than crude ORs for eosinophilic digestive disease in women, and for immune thrombocytopenia, systemic sclerosis and autoimmune hepatitis in men.

Conclusion: We found coexisting IMDs in 1 out of 6 patients with sarcoidosis. The strongest associations were found for immunodeficiencies and some systemic, rheumatic, hepatic and hematological autoimmune diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbspin.2021.105236DOI Listing
June 2021

Characterization and Outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Patients with Sarcoidosis.

Viruses 2021 05 27;13(6). Epub 2021 May 27.

Department of Autoimmune Diseases, ICMiD, Hospital Clinic, 08036 Barcelona, Spain.

To analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in patients with sarcoidosis from a large multicenter cohort from Southern Europe and to identify the risk factors associated with a more complicated infection. We searched for patients with sarcoidosis presenting with SARS-CoV-2 infection (defined according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control guidelines) among those included in the SarcoGEAS Registry, a nationwide, multicenter registry of patients fulfilling the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society/World Association of Sarcoidosis and Other Granulomatous Disorders 1999 classification criteria for sarcoidosis. A 2:1 age-sex-matched subset of patients with sarcoidosis without SARS-CoV-2 infection was selected as control population. Forty-five patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were identified (28 women, mean age 55 years). Thirty-six patients presented a symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and 14 were hospitalized (12 required supplemental oxygen, 2 intensive care unit admission and 1 mechanical ventilation). Four patients died due to progressive respiratory failure. Patients who required hospital admission had an older mean age (64.9 vs. 51.0 years, = 0.006), a higher frequency of baseline comorbidities including cardiovascular disease (64% vs. 23%, = 0.016), diabetes mellitus (43% vs. 13%, = 0.049) and chronic liver/kidney diseases (36% vs. 0%, = 0.002) and presented more frequently fever (79% vs. 35%, = 0.011) and dyspnea (50% vs. 3%, = 0.001) in comparison with patients managed at home. Age- and sex-adjusted multivariate analysis identified the age at diagnosis of SARS-Cov-2 infection as the only independent variable associated with hospitalization (adjusted 1.18, 95% conficence interval 1.04-1.35). A baseline moderate/severe pulmonary impairment in function tests was associated with a higher rate of hospitalization but the difference was not statistically significant (50% vs. 23%, = 0.219). A close monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 infection in elderly patients with sarcoidosis, especially in those with baseline cardiopulmonary diseases and chronic liver or renal failure, is recommended. The low frequency of severe pulmonary involvement in patients with sarcoidosis from Southern Europe may explain the weak prognostic role of baseline lung impairment in our study, in contrast to studies from other geographical areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13061000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8228115PMC
May 2021
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