Publications by authors named "M Arzanlou"

47 Publications

High-level resistance to aminoglycosides and ampicillin among clinical isolates of species in an Iranian referral hospital.

Iran J Microbiol 2020 Aug;12(4):319-324

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran.

Background And Objectives: Nowadays, high-level aminoglycosides and ampicillin resistant species are among the most common causes of nosocomial infections. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of high-level resistance to aminoglycosides and ampicillin among clinical isolates of species in Ardabil, Iran.

Materials And Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 111 species were collected from different clinical specimens between 2013 and 2015. species were identified using standard phenotypic and genotypic methods. BHI agar screen and agar dilution methods were used for detection of high-level gentamicin and streptomycin resistance (HLGR and HLSR) and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ampicillin, respectively.

Results: Of 111 clinical isolates, 59 (53.2%) and 25 (22.5%) isolates were and , respectively, based on the PCR results. Totally, 60.3% and 56.7% of isolates were HLGR and HLSR, respectively, as well as 51.35% were HLGR plus HLSR. Among HLGR isolates, 36 (61.01%), 18 (72%) and 13 (48.14%) were and non- non- species, respectively. Among HLSR isolates, 33 (55.93%), 16 (64%) and 14 (51.85%) were and non- non- species, respectively. All HLGR isolates contained gene. Overall, the prevalence of high-level ampicillin resistance among species was 17.1%. For and non- non- species, ampicillin resistance rates were as follows: 11 (40.74%), 7 (28%) and 1 (1.69%), respectively. For aminoglycoside antibiotics, the resistance rate was significantly higher in isolates and for ampicillin it was higher in isolates.

Conclusion: The frequency of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococcal isolates in our hospital was high and significant ampicillin resistance was noticed. This would require routine testing of enterococcal isolates for HLAR and ampicillin susceptibility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/ijm.v12i4.3935DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7502148PMC
August 2020

Evaluating the efficiency of TaqMan real-time PCR and serological methods in the detection of Brucella spp. in clinical specimens collected from suspected patients in Ardabil, Iran.

J Microbiol Methods 2020 08 13;175:105982. Epub 2020 Jun 13.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Science, Ardabil, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of the TaqMan real-time PCR and serological methods in detecting Brucella spp. in clinical specimens that have been collected from suspected patients in Ardabil, Iran.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 113 consecutive patients suspected of brucellosis who were referred to the three hospitals in Ardabil province were selected. In the first step, the diagnosis of brucellosis was performed by serological methods including the Rose Bengal slide agglutination test, Wright test, 2-ME test, and BrucellaCapt test. In the next step, TaqMan real-time PCR with primer and probe targeting the bcsp31 gene was used for the detection of Brucella spp. Specificity, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values of the TaqMan real-time PCR assay were calculated.

Results: Among 113 suspected patients with different clinical manifestations, the Rose Bengal slide agglutination test, Wright test, and 2-ME test were positive in 60 cases; however, the BrucellaCapt test titer was 1:160 for one patient. Six patients had high initial serum antibody titers; 2-ME titers of ≥1:640; STA titers of ≥1:1280; BrucellaCapt titers of ≥ 1:2560. Among positive cases, no correlation was observed among gender, age, and life (residence) in urban or rural areas. The TaqMan real-time PCR was positive in 35% of all 60 positive cases. The comparison of the results of the BrucellaCapt and TaqMan real-time PCR methods revealed that 19 out of 54 (35.2%) and 2 out of 6 (33.4%) BrucellaCapt positive cases with titers of >1:320 and ≤ 1:320 were positive, respectively. The sensitivities and specificities of the TaqMan real-time PCR assay were 49.1% and 100% respectively.

Conclusion: The sensitivity of the TaqMan real-time PCR assay was low in the diagnosis of brucellosis, while the BrucellaCapt test turned out to be a very valuable, sensitive, and specific test for the diagnosis of brucellosis in suspected patients and, thus, can provide reliable results in medical laboratories.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2020.105982DOI Listing
August 2020

Molecular characterization of quinolone resistant spp. isolates from patients in Ardabil, Iran.

Iran J Microbiol 2019 Dec;11(6):496-501

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran.

Background And Objectives: is an etiological agent of shigellosis. Antibiotic therapy has a critical role in decreasing serious complications of shigellosis. The present study aimed to determine the multi-drug resistance strains and to detect fluoroquinolone related mutations.

Materials And Methods: In this descriptive, cross sectional study, a total of 113 isolates were collected from 1280 patients admitted to Bu-Ali hospital in Ardabil province during 2015-17. Antibiotic resistance pattern of isolates was evaluated using Kirby Bauer method and finally, the MICs of ciprofloxacin were determined. In order to determine any mutations in QRDR region, and genes of resistant strains were amplified and sequenced.

Results: spp. isolates were identified using amplification and and genes were used for molecular detection of and , respectively. Our results showed that the predominant species in Ardabil province was (69.91%). Most of isolates (82%) were resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX); 51% were nalidixic acid resistant and 4.4% were floroquinolones resistant. All examined isolates were susceptible to imipenem (100%). Mutation in and genes were detected in all fluoroquinolone resistant isolates (5 isolates). Although, in this study the rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin was low, but in the lack of preventive strategy it will be a major challenge of public health in future.

Conclusion: This study provided information on the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolates in Ardabil province, Iran. Also this study showed a high-level of resistance to commonly used antibiotics among isolates.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7048964PMC
December 2019

Prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant serotypes in Iran: a meta-analysis.

Pathog Glob Health 2020 02 4;114(1):16-29. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Halal Research Center of IRI, FDA, Tehran, Iran.

The present study was conducted to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of serotypes, especially fluoroquinolone-resistant strains, recovered from clinical samples in Iran. A full electronic search using related keywords was conducted in Persian and English languages in ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and the Scientific Information Database (SID) search engines to find papers published between 1983 and 1 July 2019. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 46 eligible articles were selected for the final analysis out of the initial 13,186 studies retrieved. The pooled prevalence of quinolone-resistant serotypes in clinical specimens in Iran was 2.9% to ciprofloxacin and 48.1% to nalidixic acid. Additional data on antibiotic resistance was as follows: 54.3% to tetracycline, 50.6% to ceftizoxime, 50.2% to streptomycin, 37.9% to ampicillin, 36.5% to kanamycin, 33.5% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 27.2% to chloramphenicol, 19.1% to cephalothin, 8.8% to ceftriaxone, 7.6% to cefotaxime, 7.4% to aztreonam, 7.2% to gentamicin, 7% to cefepime, 6.8% to ceftazidime, 5.8% to cefixime, 2.7% to imipenem and 2.2% to meropenem. Findings of the present study showed a rising trend of resistance to the drugs of choice for the treatment of infections, i.e. ampicillin, chloramphenicol and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in Iran. However, ciprofloxacin, third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems are still effective antibiotics especially against multi-drug resistant strains in Iran.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20477724.2020.1719701DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7144288PMC
February 2020

New species of associated with leaf spot diseases in Iran.

Mycologia 2019 Nov-Dec;111(6):1056-1071. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Westerdijk Fungal Biodiversity Institute, Uppsalalaan 8, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Species of are commonly associated with leaf spot diseases of a broad range of plant hosts worldwide. During our investigation of fungi associated with leaf spot diseases in northern and northwestern Iran, several isolates were recovered from symptomatic leaves on different herbaceous and woody plants in the Asteraceae, Betulaceae, and Salicaceae families. These isolates were studied by applying a polyphasic approach including morphological and cultural data and a multigene phylogeny using a combined data set of partial sequences of the 28S nuc rRNA gene (large subunit [28S]), internal transcribed spacer regions and intervening 5.8S nuc rRNA gene (ITS) of the nuc rDNA operon, actin (), translation elongation factor 1-α (), calmodulin (), β-tubulin (), and DNA-directed RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (). Four novel species are proposed, namely, on on on , and on . All species are illustrated, and their morphology and phylogenetic relationships with other species are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00275514.2019.1669376DOI Listing
June 2020