Publications by authors named "M A Ibrahim"

3,696 Publications

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Teaching Radiology to Medical Students in Canada; a Virtual, Integrative, Clinical Approach.

Can Assoc Radiol J 2021 Sep 27:8465371211043562. Epub 2021 Sep 27.

Department of Abdominal Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Purpose: To construct, apply, and evaluate a multidisciplinary approach in teaching radiology to Canadian medical students.

Methods: A multidisciplinary team of radiology and other disciplines experts designed an online 5-session course that was delivered to medical students. The topics of each session were clinical cases involving different systems. The target audience was medical students of Canadian schools. Pretests and post-tests were administered before and after each session respectively. An evaluation survey was distributed at the end of the course to gauge students' perceptions of this experience.

Results: An average of 425 medical students attended the live sessions. For each session, 405 students completed both the pre-tests and post-tests. In general, students scored an average of 56% higher on the post-test than on the pre-test. The final course survey was completed by 469 students. The survey results show that more than 98% of students found the course to meet or exceed their expectations. Over 80% of students agreed that the course increased their interest in radiology and about 81% agree that the topics presented were excellent and clinically important. The ratings in the final survey results also indicate that students increased their confidence in basic radiology skills after completing the course.

Conclusions: The implementation of an integrative clinical approach to teaching radiology in a virtual setting is achievable. It provides efficient use of educational resources while being accessible by a large number of students across different medical schools.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/08465371211043562DOI Listing
September 2021

Effects of pollution on hydrogeochemistry and water quality of the Damietta branch (Nile River, Egypt).

Water Sci Technol 2021 Sep;84(6):1509-1517

Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq 25113, Jordan E-mail:

Currently, different sources of contamination threaten water quality in Damietta, Egypt. The aim of this study was to assess the pollution, hydrogeochemistry and suitability for use in agriculture of water collected atseven stations along the Damietta branch of the Nile River. In addition to pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and electrical conductivity (EC), levels of Mg, Ca, K, Na, Cl, HCO, SO and CO were measured. From the highest to the lowest, the concentrations of cations were Na > Ca > Mg > K, whereas those of anions were HCO > SO > Cl in water samples collected at seven stations along the Damietta branch. Moreover, water quality indexes, such as sodium percentage (Na%) ranged between 21.6 and 71.4, Kelly's ratio from 0.37 to 3.85, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) varied from 1.73 to 61.8, residual sodium carbonate (RSC) found to be in range of 0.2 to 3.8. Also, the potential salinity (PS) and permeability index (PI), magnesium hazard (MH), were calculated. Most samples (71%) belonged to the Mg-Ca-Na-HCO watertype. Fertilization wastes were identified as the main contributors of alkaline earth metals, whereas ion exchange was the main source of alkali metals. This work also provides information on distinguishing geochemical behaviors and the pollution of water samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/wst.2021.327DOI Listing
September 2021

Age-related histomorphometric and ultrastructural changes in the Sertoli cells of Japanese quail (Coturnix Coturnix japonica).

Tissue Cell 2021 Sep 16;73:101650. Epub 2021 Sep 16.

Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, Pretoria, 0110, South Africa.

Prepared sections from pre-pubertal, pubertal, adult, and aged Japanese quail testes were examined by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and measurements of seminiferous tubular diameter (STD), luminal diameter (SLD), epithelial height (SEH) and cross-sectional area of the seminiferous tubules (AST) were taken using an image analyzer. Apoptotic Sertoli cells with features such as cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation were observed in pre-pubertal and aged quail. There was a significant difference between the mean Sertoli cell number (SCN), SLD, SEH, STD and AST among the four age groups (P < 0.001). The highest SCN (mean ± standard error) was recorded in the adult (30.53 ± 0.42), with the aged group displaying the lowest mean (11.80 ± 0.27) SCN. Spearman's rho correlation coefficients demonstrated a strong relationship between the SCN and SEH in the pubertal (ρ=0.915; P < 0.001), adult (ρ=0.878; P < 0.001), and aged (ρ=0.858; P < 0.001) groups, while a significant moderate correlation was observed in the pre-pubertal (ρ=0.606; P < 0.001) group. There were significant moderate correlations between the SCN and STD in the pre-pubertal (ρ=0.445; P < 0.001), pubertal (ρ=0.653; P < 0.001), adult (ρ=0.440; P < 0.001), and aged (ρ=0.514; P < 0.001) groups. Furthermore, significant moderate correlations were estimated between the SCN and AST in the pre-pubertal (ρ=0.453; P < 0.001), pubertal (ρ=0.661; P < 0.001), adult (ρ=0.393; P = 0.001), and aged (ρ=0.498; P < 0.001) groups. This study provides baseline data on the morphology and development of the Sertoli cell, as well as testicular morphometry in avian species during the pre-pubertal, pubertal, adult, and aged stages using the Japanese quail as a model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tice.2021.101650DOI Listing
September 2021

Exposure to organochlorine pesticides as a predictor to breast cancer: A case-control study among Ethiopian women.

PLoS One 2021 23;16(9):e0257704. Epub 2021 Sep 23.

Department of Oncology Addis Ababa, College of Health Sciences, University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Breast cancer (BC) is becoming one of the most prevalent non-infectious disease in low and middle income countries. The steady rise of BC incidence may be related to the different risk factors. Among many, rampant presence of environmental pollutants might be one of the risk factors. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate exposure to organochlorine pesticides as a risk factor to breast cancer. A case-control study design was employed among breast cancer patients and non-breast cancer individuals (controls). Blood samples were collected from 100 study participants (50 cases and 50 controls) followed by serum separation, extraction and cleanup using standard analytical procdures. The findings revealed that ten organochlorine pesticides were detected in the serum of the study participants. From the detected organochlorine pesticides, heptachlor was observed at higher concentration for breast cancer patients (6.90±4.37 μg/L) and controls (9.15±3.84 μg/L). Mean serum level of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, heptachlor, gamma-chlordane, endosulfan, and dibutyl-chlorendate were significantly higher in the serum of breast cancer patients than the controls. From the studied pesticides, p,p'-DDT and gamma-chlordane are significant predictors for BC, while, others are equivocal. A unit increment of the concentration of p,p'-DDT (AOR; 2.03, 95% CI: 1.041-3.969) increased the odds of developing breast cancer by two, while for gamma-chlordane (AOR;3.12, 95% CI; 1.186-8.203) by three. Our study results suggesting that, organochlorines are a risk factors for breast cancer in Ethiopia. Decreasing exposure to such organochlorines might have a significant public health relevance in reducing non-communicable chronic illnesses. Besides, continues monitoring of persistent organic pollutants using body biomarkers is important for disease prevention and device mitigation measures.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0257704PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8460037PMC
September 2021

Dispositional Active Coping Predicts Patterns of Adolescents' Cortisol Responsivity in the Context of School-related Stressors.

J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 2021 Sep 23:1-12. Epub 2021 Sep 23.

Department of Psychology, Arizona State University.

The goal of this study was to examine the direct and conditional effects of active coping and prior exposure to school-related stressors on cortisol reactivity and recovery in response to an academically salient, social stress task. Participants included N= 758 adolescents (50% male; M age = 12.03 years, SD = .49) enrolled in the 7th grade in Title 1 middle schools. Adolescents were predominantly ethnic minorities (62% Hispanic, 12% non-Hispanic White, 11% non-Hispanic Black, 7% Native American, and 8% "other"). Youth completed self-reported assessments of their dispositional use of active coping strategies, prior exposure to school hassles, pubertal status, medication use, and relevant demographic information. In addition, youth engaged in an academically salient group public speaking task adapted for adolescents and provided salivary cortisol sample pre-task, immediately post-task, 15-, and 30-minutes post-task. Results from piecewise latent growth curve modeling revealed that active coping independently predicted lower cortisol reactivity to the stress task. Furthermore, active coping was associated with slower cortisol recovery when adolescents reported not having experienced any school hassles in the past three months and faster recovery when having experienced several school hassles in the past three months. Results from multinomial logistic regressions revealed that greater use of active coping strategies was less likely to predict a hyper-reactive pattern of cortisol responding compared to other patterns. Findings provide support for active coping as a way to promote adaptive physiological responding to school-related stressors among ethnically diverse youth residing in low-income communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2021.1969651DOI Listing
September 2021
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