Publications by authors named "Lyo Min Kwon"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Glue Embolization of Lymphopseudoaneurysm for Chylous Ascites after Retroperitoneal Surgery.

Korean J Radiol 2021 03 28;22(3):376-383. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Objective: To assess the safety and efficacy of lymphopseudoaneurysm (LPA) glue (n-butyl cyanoacrylate [NBCA]) embolization in the management of chylous ascites after retroperitoneal surgery.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective analysis from January 2014 to October 2018 was performed in six patients (4 females and 2 males; mean age, 45.3 ± 14.2 years; range, 26-61 years) who underwent LPA embolization for chylous ascites developing after retroperitoneal surgery involving the perirenal space (four donor nephrectomies, one partial nephrectomy, and one retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy). After placing a percutaneous drainage catheter into the LPA or adjacent lymphocele, embolization was performed by filling the LPA itself with a mixture of glue and Lipiodol (Guerbet).

Results: Daily drainage from percutaneously placed drains exceeded 300 mL/day despite medical and surgical treatment (volume: mean, 1173 ± 1098 mL; range, 305-2800 mL). Intranodal lymphangiography was performed in four of the six patients and revealed leakage in 2 patients. Percutaneous embolization of the LPA was successful in all patients using an NBCA and Lipiodol mixture in a ratio of 1:1-1:2 (volume: mean, 4.3 ± 1.1 mL; range, 3-6 mL). Chylous ascites was resolved and the drainage catheter was removed in all patients within 4 days after the procedure (mean, 2.0 ± 1.8 days; range, 0-4 days). No procedure-related complications or recurrence of chylous ascites occurred during a mean follow-up period of 37.3 months (range, 21.1-48.4 months).

Conclusion: Glue embolization of LPA has the potential to be a feasible and effective treatment method for the management of chylous ascites after retroperitoneal surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3348/kjr.2020.0056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7909856PMC
March 2021

Lymphatic Embolization for Primary Chylous Reflux of Genitalia in 2 Cases.

J Vasc Interv Radiol 2019 Jul 22;30(7):1140-1143. Epub 2019 May 22.

Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2018.12.706DOI Listing
July 2019

Ultrasound features of secondary appendicitis in pediatric patients.

Ultrasonography 2018 Jul 25;37(3):233-243. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of secondary appendicitis (SA) and to discuss the differential findings compared with primary appendicitis.

Methods: In this study, we analyzed the ultrasonographic findings of 94 patients under 15 years old of age treated at our institution from May 2005 to May 2014 who had bowel inflammation and an inflamed appendix with a maximal outer diameter >6 mm that improved with nonsurgical treatment (the SA group). Ninety-nine patients with pathologically proven acute appendicitis (the primary appendicitis [PA] group) from June 2013 to May 2014 and 44 patients with pathologically negative appendectomy results from May 2005 to May 2014 were also included to compare the ultrasonographic features of these conditions. A retrospective review of the ultrasonographic findings was performed by two radiologists. The clinical and laboratory findings were also reviewed. The results were statically analyzed using analysis of variance, the Pearson chi-square test, and the two-tailed Fisher exact test.

Results: Compared with PA, cases of SA had a smaller diameter (9.8 mm vs. 6.6 mm, P<0.001), and were less likely to show periappendiceal fat inflammation (98% vs. 6%, P<0.001) or an appendicolith (34% vs. 11%, P<0.001). SA showed mural hyperemia on color Doppler ultrasonography as frequently as PA (P=0.887).

Conclusion: The ultrasonographic features of SA included an increased diameter compared to a healthy appendix and the same level of hyperemia as in PA. However, the diameter was commonly in the equivocal range (mean diameter, 6.6 mm), and periappendiceal fat inflammation was rarely present in SA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14366/usg.17029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6044217PMC
July 2018

Outcomes of Esophageal Arterial Embolization for Treatment of Hemoptysis.

J Vasc Interv Radiol 2017 Feb 7;28(2):284-290. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Department of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates.

Purpose: To investigate safety and efficacy of esophageal arterial embolization (EAE) in addition to bronchial arterial embolization (BAE) for treatment of hemoptysis as well as the importance and characteristics of esophageal arteries in patients with hemoptysis.

Materials And Methods: Between January 2013 and December 2014, 20 patients (13 men and 7 women, mean age 58.4 y) underwent EAE in addition to BAE for hemoptysis. Retrospective review of patient records was performed to evaluate major causes of hemoptysis, treatment indications based on CT findings, esophageal angiography findings, and outcomes after embolization including clinical success rate and complications.

Results: Hemoptysis was caused by bronchiectasis (12 patients), tuberculosis (7 patients), and lobectomy (1 patient). CT showed lower lobe lung lesions in all (100%) patients. The esophageal arteries originated from the aorta between the carina and diaphragm (18 patients) or from the inferior phrenic arteries (2 patients) and were tortuous with longitudinal off-midline courses. Communications between the esophageal and the bronchial or inferior phrenic arteries were present in 12 patients. One patient who was treated using N-butyl cyanoacrylate developed dysphagia that resolved with medical treatment. Repeat BAE was performed in 2 patients 5 days and 20 days later, and the clinical success rate was 90% (18/20).

Conclusions: EAE in addition to BAE is safe in the treatment of hemoptysis and should be considered for lower lobe lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2016.09.026DOI Listing
February 2017

A Case of Spontaneous Isolated Dissection of Left Gastric Artery.

J Korean Med Sci 2016 Sep;31(9):1349-50

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2016.31.9.1349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4974173PMC
September 2016

Intramural esophageal dissection diagnosed on transabdominal ultrasonography.

Jpn J Radiol 2015 Dec 22;33(12):764-8. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, 896, Pyeongchon-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 431-070, Republic of Korea.

Intramural esophageal dissection (IED) is an uncommon yet important clinical entity characterized by a rupture or fissure in the esophageal submucosal layer. IED could occur spontaneously or secondary to direct extrinsic injury to the esophageal mucosa. Traditionally, IED has been diagnosed on the swallowing study using water-soluble contrast agents or barium. For alternative diagnostic modalities, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and chest computed tomography have been frequently performed. However, to the best of our knowledge, the transabdominal ultrasonography (USG) appearance of IED has not been reported in the literature yet. We report an interesting case of IED, which was initially diagnosed on the transabdominal USG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11604-015-0488-0DOI Listing
December 2015

Zinc chelation reduces hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced seizure.

PLoS One 2012 31;7(10):e48543. Epub 2012 Oct 31.

Department of Physiology, Hallym University, College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

Several studies have shown that epileptic seizures increase hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult. However, the mechanism underlying increased neurogenesis after seizures remains largely unknown. Neurogenesis occurs in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in the adult brain, although an understanding of why it actively occurs in this region has remained elusive. A high level of vesicular zinc is localized in the presynaptic terminals of the SGZ. Previously, we demonstrated that a possible correlation may exist between synaptic zinc localization and high rates of neurogenesis in this area after hypoglycemia. Using a lithium-pilocarpine model, we tested our hypothesis that zinc plays a key role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis after seizure. Then, we injected the zinc chelator, clioquinol (CQ, 30 mg/kg), into the intraperitoneal space to reduce brain zinc availability. Neuronal death was detected with Fluoro Jade-B and NeuN staining to determine whether CQ has neuroprotective effects after seizure. The total number of degenerating and live neurons was similar in vehicle and in CQ treated rats at 1 week after seizure. Neurogenesis was evaluated using BrdU, Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining 1 week after seizure. The number of BrdU, Ki67 and DCX positive cell was increased after seizure. However, the number of BrdU, Ki67 and DCX positive cells was significantly decreased by CQ treatment. Intracellular zinc chelator, N,N,N0,N-Tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), also reduced seizure-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The present study shows that zinc chelation does not prevent neurodegeneration but does reduce seizure-induced progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Therefore, this study suggests that zinc has an essential role for modulating hippocampal neurogenesis after seizure.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0048543PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3485345PMC
April 2013