Publications by authors named "Lydie Postic"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The VP3 Protein of Bluetongue Virus Associates with the MAVS Complex and Interferes with the RIG-I-Signaling Pathway.

Viruses 2021 02 2;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 2.

UMR 1161 Virologie, Laboratory for Animal Health, INRAE, Department of Animal Health, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, ANSES, Université Paris-Est, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France.

Bluetongue virus (BTV), an arbovirus transmitted by biting midges, is a major concern of wild and domestic ruminants. While BTV induces type I interferon (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β]) production in infected cells, several reports have described evasion strategies elaborated by this virus to dampen this intrinsic, innate response. In the present study, we suggest that BTV VP3 is a new viral antagonist of the IFN-β synthesis. Indeed, using split luciferase and coprecipitation assays, we report an interaction between VP3 and both the mitochondrial adapter protein MAVS and the IRF3-kinase IKKε. Overall, this study describes a putative role for the BTV structural protein VP3 in the control of the antiviral response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13020230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7913109PMC
February 2021

Clinical cases of Bluetongue serotype 8 in calves in France in the 2018-2019 winter.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2020 May 8;67(3):1401-1405. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Epidemiology Unit, Laboratory for Animal Health, ANSES, University Paris Est, Maisons-Alfort, France.

Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) caused an epizootic in Europe in 2006/09. Transplacental transmission of BTV-8 was demonstrated leading to abortions, congenital malformations or nervous clinical signs in newborn calves. BTV-8 re-emerged in France in 2015. Although the re-emergent strain is nearly genetically identical to the one that had circulated in 2006/2009, it has caused very few clinical cases. However, from mid-December 2018 to April 2019, cases of calves with congenital malformations or displaying nervous clinical signs occurred in some departments (French administrative unit) in mainland France. Blood samples from these animals were sent to local laboratories, and the positive ones were confirmed at the French Bluetongue reference laboratory (BT-NRL). Out of 580 samples found positive at the local laboratories, 544 were confirmed as RT-PCR BTV-8 positive. The 36 samples found positive in the local laboratories and negative in the BT-NRL were all at the limit of RT-PCR detection. Hundred eighty-eight of the confirmed samples were also tested for the presence of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection: 4 were found positive for BVDV and none for SBV. The main clinical signs recorded for 244 calves, for which a reporting form was completed by veterinarians, included nervous clinical signs (81%), amaurosis (72%) and decrease/ no suckling reflex (40%). Hydranencephaly and microphthalmia were reported in 19 calves out of 27 in which a necropsy was practiced after death or euthanasia. These results indicate that the re-emergent strain of BTV-8 can cross the transplacental barrier and cause congenital malformations or nervous clinical signs in calves.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13466DOI Listing
May 2020

Bluetongue Virus in France: An Illustration of the European and Mediterranean Context since the 2000s.

Viruses 2019 07 23;11(7). Epub 2019 Jul 23.

UMR Virologie, INRA, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, laboratoire de santé animale d'Alfort, ANSES, Université Paris-Est, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France.

Bluetongue (BT) is a non-contagious animal disease transmitted by midges of the genus. The etiological agent is the BT virus (BTV) that induces a variety of clinical signs in wild or domestic ruminants. BT is included in the notifiable diseases list of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) due to its health impact on domestic ruminants. A total of 27 BTV serotypes have been described and additional serotypes have recently been identified. Since the 2000s, the distribution of BTV has changed in Europe and in the Mediterranean Basin, with continuous BTV incursions involving various BTV serotypes and strains. These BTV strains, depending on their origin, have emerged and spread through various routes in the Mediterranean Basin and/or in Europe. Consequently, control measures have been put in place in France to eradicate the virus or circumscribe its spread. These measures mainly consist of assessing virus movements and the vaccination of domestic ruminants. Many vaccination campaigns were first carried out in Europe using attenuated vaccines and, in a second period, using exclusively inactivated vaccines. This review focuses on the history of the various BTV strain incursions in France since the 2000s, describing strain characteristics, their origins, and the different routes of spread in Europe and/or in the Mediterranean Basin. The control measures implemented to address this disease are also discussed. Finally, we explain the circumstances leading to the change in the BTV status of France from BTV-free in 2000 to an enzootic status since 2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v11070672DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6669443PMC
July 2019