Publications by authors named "Lydia G Roos"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Post-traumatic stress and psychological health following infidelity in unmarried young adults.

Stress Health 2019 Oct 26;35(4):468-479. Epub 2019 Jul 26.

Health Psychology PhD Program, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Infidelity is often conceptualized as a traumatic event; however, little research has explored this topic empirically, particularly in unmarried adults. We determined the prevalence of infidelity-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among unmarried adults who experienced a partner's infidelity and whether probable infidelity-related PTSD was associated with additional psychological health outcomes (i.e., depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and anxiety symptoms). We also investigated whether negative post-traumatic cognitions mediated the associations between infidelity-related PTSD symptoms and psychological health. This study included 73 adults (M age = 19.42, SE = 0.19 years) who experienced infidelity within a committed nonmarital relationship within the last 5 years. Controlling for gender, race, and exposure to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders Criterion A traumas, 45.2% of our sample reported symptoms suggesting probable infidelity-related PTSD. Whether used as continuous or categorical predictor, infidelity-related PTSD symptoms were significantly associated with depressive symptoms, although results for perceived stress and anxiety symptoms were mixed. Post-traumatic cognitions acted as a partial mediator for depressive symptoms and full mediator for perceived stress and anxiety symptoms. This empirical evidence suggests that infidelity may produce PTSD symptoms at a relatively high rate, even in unmarried young adults, and may put individuals at risk for poorer psychological health, partially through post-traumatic cognitions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smi.2880DOI Listing
October 2019

Higher trait reappraisal predicts stronger HPA axis habituation to repeated stress.

Psychoneuroendocrinology 2019 03 23;101:12-18. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Department of Psychology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany. Electronic address:

Undergoing stress can be advantageous when it leads to adaptation and growth; however, failure of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to habituate (i.e., nonhabituation) involves continuing to become highly activated in response to repeated exposure of the same stimulus and is considered maladaptive. Although 50-75% of individuals assessed in a laboratory exhibit adaptive habituation to repeated stress, variability in habituation suggests psychological processes used in response to stress may play a role, such as emotion regulation (ER). Nonetheless, no research to date has investigated whether ER strategies affect HPA axis habituation. We investigated whether tendency to use two ER strategies, reappraisal and suppression, influenced HPA axis habituation among 84 healthy young adults (60.7% female; M = 24.8 years, SD = 6.0) exposed to a standardized experimental stress paradigm on two consecutive days. HPA axis stress responses were assessed using salivary cortisol concentrations. We also examined whether non-manipulated state ER strategies (i.e., those used by the participant during and following the stressor on the first day) modulated HPA axis habituation over and above trait-use in a subsample (N = 60). Trait, but not state, reappraisal was associated with stronger HPA axis habituation. Neither trait nor state suppression were significantly associated with HPA axis habituation. These findings expand our current understanding of how ER can affect stress-related health outcomes and suggest habitual reappraisal plays an important role in adaption of the HPA axis to stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.10.018DOI Listing
March 2019

Correction to: Formative Research on Knowledge and Preferences for Stool-based Tests compared to Colonoscopy: What Patients and Providers Think.

J Community Health 2018 12;43(6):1093

Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 68 President Street, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.

The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. There is a typo in the coauthor name, it should be Franklin G. Berger.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-018-0534-9DOI Listing
December 2018

Formative Research on Knowledge and Preferences for Stool-based Tests compared to Colonoscopy: What Patients and Providers Think.

J Community Health 2018 12;43(6):1085-1092

Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 68 President Street, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.

The rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in the U.S. remain below national targets, so many people at risk are not being screened. The objective of this qualitative research project was to assess patient and provider knowledge and preferences about CRC screening modalities and specifically the use of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) as a first line screening choice. Nine focus groups were conducted with a medically underserved patient population and qualitative interviews were administered to their medical providers. Thematic analysis was used to synthesize key findings. Both providers and patients thought that the FIT would be a good option for CRC screening both as an individual choice and for an overall program approach. The test is less expensive and therefore more readily available for patients compared to colonoscopy. Overall, there was consensus that the FIT offers a reasonably priced, simple approach to CRC screening which has broad appeal to both providers and patients. Concerns identified by patients and providers included the possibility of false positives with the FIT which could be caused by test contamination or failing to perform the test properly. Patients also described feelings of disgust toward performing the FIT and difficulties in following the instructions. Study findings indicate provider and patient support for using the FIT for CRC screening at both the individual and system-wide levels of implementation. While barriers to the use of the FIT were listed, benefits of using the FIT were perceived as positive motivators to engage previously unscreened and uninsured or under-insured individuals in CRC screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-018-0525-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6239994PMC
December 2018

Stressful life events, relationship stressors, and cortisol reactivity: The moderating role of suppression.

Psychoneuroendocrinology 2018 03 2;89:69-77. Epub 2018 Jan 2.

Health Psychology PhD Program, USA; Department of Psychological Science, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA. Electronic address:

Stressful life events (SLEs) are exceedingly common and have been associated with a range of psychological disorders, perhaps through dysregulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The use of certain emotion regulation strategies in response to stress, such as expressive suppression and cognitive reappraisal, has additionally been linked to heightened HPA axis reactivity to acute stress. However, it is unclear how emotion regulation may interact with SLEs to affect HPA axis reactivity, particularly concerning relationship stressors (RSs). Using cross-sectional data from 117 men and 85 women aged 18-55 years old (M = 39.9 ± 10.7), we investigated whether trait use of suppression or reappraisal interacted with recent negatively perceived SLEs and relationship stressors to impact HPA axis response to an acute stressor. Separate area under the curve and linear mixed models revealed that trait suppression interacted with SLEs and RSs to predict cortisol response to stress, while reappraisal did not. Findings indicate higher trait expressive suppression may influence the cortisol response to acute stress after exposure to more recent stressful events, particularly when those stressful events include relationship stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.12.026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5878721PMC
March 2018
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