Publications by authors named "Luis H B Ferreira"

4 Publications

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Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Properties of Muscle, Bone, and Brain Function in Older Adults: A Narrative Review.

J Diet Suppl 2021 Jan 27:1-18. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Research Group on Metabolism, Nutrition and Strength Training, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

Aging is associated with reductions in muscle and bone mass and brain function, which may be counteracted by several lifestyle factors, of which exercise appears to be most beneficial. However, less than 20% of older adults (> 55 years of age) adhere to performing the recommended amount of resistance training (≥ 2 days/week) and less than 12% regularly meet the aerobic exercise guidelines (≥ 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic exercise) required to achieve significant health benefits. Therefore, from a healthy aging and clinical perspective, it is important to determine whether other lifestyle interventions (independent of exercise) can have beneficial effects on aging muscle quality and quantity, bone strength, and brain function. Creatine, a nitrogen containing organic compound found in all cells of the body, has the potential to have favorable effects on muscle, bone, and brain health (independent of exercise) in older adults. The purpose of this narrative review is to examine and summarize the small body of research investigating the effects of creatine supplementation alone on measures of muscle mass and performance, bone mineral and strength, and indices of brain health in older adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2021.1877232DOI Listing
January 2021

Reduced Dose of Beta-Alanine Is Sufficient to Maintain Performance in Repeated Sprints.

J Strength Cond Res 2020 Aug 21. Epub 2020 Aug 21.

Research Group on Metabolism, Nutrition and Strength Training, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil.

Zandona, BA, Ramos, RA, de Oliveira, CdS, McAnulty, SR, Ferreira, LHB, Smolarek, AC, Enes, AAN, Urbinati, KMdSS, Aragon, AA, Schoenfeld, BJ, and de Souza Junior, TP. Reduced Dose of Beta-Alanine Is Sufficient to Maintain Performance in Repeated Sprints. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2020-Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation has been shown to be effective in improving physical performance by increasing carnosine concentration. However, it is still necessary to know the effect of a maintenance dose on performance. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of a maintenance dose of BA supplementation on performance. Forty-four anaerobically trained men with 23.9 ± 3.8 years of age, 176.0 ± 0.05 cm height, 81.2 ± 7.5 kg body mass, and 15.5 ± 2.9% of body fat performed a cycle ergometer test consisting of 4 sprints of 30 s with 4 minutes of active recovery. The study comprised 3 phases: (a) presupplementation, (b) supplementation with 6.4 g·d BA or placebo, and (c) postsupplementation with a maintenance dose of 1.2 g·d of BA or interruption of supplementation. Data were analyzed using generalized estimated equations with a priori 0.05 level of significance. The placebo group and interruption group presented a lower power (7.28 ± 0.66 and 7.71 ± 0.42 W·kg vs. 8.04 ± 0.84 and 9.25 ± 1.18 W·kg, respectively; p < 0.05) during the third sprint in postsupplementation, whereas the maintenance group maintained the required power (7.47 ± 1.03 vs. 8.74 ± 1.07 W·kg; p > 0.05). The placebo group also presented higher percentage of fatigue (44.5% ± 12.3 and 44.8% ± 7.7 vs. 37.6 ± 7.2%; p = 0.021) and higher subjective perception of exertion (8.92 ± 0.90 vs. 8.00 ± 1.60; p = 0.028). Therefore, the maintenance dose of 1.2 g·d BA was effective in maintaining performance, whereas a reduction in performance was observed after supplementation interruption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003715DOI Listing
August 2020

High doses of sodium bicarbonate increase lactate levels and delay exhaustion in a cycling performance test.

Nutrition 2019 04 13;60:94-99. Epub 2018 Oct 13.

Research Group on Metabolism, Nutrition and Strength Training, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil; Appalachian State University, Department of Health and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Caroline, USA.

Objectives: It is well established that ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO) causes metabolic alkalosis. However, there is no consensus in terms of optimal NaHCO doses leading to enhanced performance. This study aimed to determine the effects of different NaHCO doses on performance and lactate clearance in non-professional cyclists.

Methods: Twenty-one cyclists performed the following three double-blind trials: 1) ingestion of 0.3 g · kg body weight (BW) of placebo; 2) ingestion of 0.1 g · kg BW NaHCO plus 0.2 g · kg BW placebo (0.1 BC); and 3) ingestion of 0.3 g · kg BW NaHCO (0.3 BC). Performance was evaluated after warm-up on the bike followed by a performance test until exhaustion. Lactate levels were monitored in blood samples before and immediately after performance tests.

Results: Lactate levels in the blood were significantly higher after exercise in 0.3 BC and 0.1 BC (15.12 ± 0.92 versus 10.3 ± 1.22 and 13.24 ± 0.87 versus 10.3 ± 1.22 mmol/L; P < 0.05) compared with control. Significant improvements in performance were only identified in 0.3 BC group (76.42 ± 2.14; P = 0.01).

Conclusions: The present study found that 0.3 g · kg BW NaHCO is effective in improving performance and improving blood lactate levels in cyclists compared with control and 0.1 g · kg BW NaHCO
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2018.09.018DOI Listing
April 2019

Effect of low dose, short-term creatine supplementation on muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.

J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2017 7;14. Epub 2017 Feb 7.

Department of Physical Education, Research Group on Metabolism, Nutrition and Strength Training, Curitiba, Brazil.

Background: To determine the effects of a low dose, short-term Creatine monohydrate (Cr) supplementation (0.03 g.kg.d during 14 d) on muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.

Methods: Using a two-group matched, double blind, placebo-controlled design, nineteen male soccer players (mean age = 17.0 ± 0.5 years) were randomly assigned to either Cr ( = 9) or placebo ( = 10) group. Before and after supplementation, participants performed a 30s Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) to assess peak power output (PPO), mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI), and total work.

Results: There were significant increases in both PPO and MPO after the Cr supplementation period ( ≤ 0.05) but not the placebo period. There were also significant increases in total work, but not FI, after the Cr supplementation and placebo periods ( ≤ 0.05). Notably, there were differences in total work between the Cr and placebo groups after ( ≤ 0.05) but not before the 14 d supplementation period.

Conclusion: There is substantial evidence to indicate that a low-dose, short-term oral Cr supplementation beneficially affected muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12970-017-0162-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5296953PMC
January 2018
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