Publications by authors named "Luis Gómez-Gordo"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CHARACTERIZATION OF LESIONS INDUCED BY SPIROCERCA VULPIS (SPIRURIDAE: SPIROCERCIDAE) IN RED FOXES (VULPES VULPES).

J Wildl Dis 2021 Nov 17. Epub 2021 Nov 17.

Universidad de Extremadura, Facultad de Veterinaria, Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Parasitología, Avda. Universidad s/n, 10003, Cáceres, Spain.

Spirocerca lupi infection in dogs (Canis domesticus) is associated with esophageal lesions that may evolve to a neoplastic stage in the form of esophageal sarcoma. In the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) infected with the closely related Spirocerca vulpis, similar lesions may occur in the stomach, but neoplastic forms have not been reported. We characterize Spirocerca vulpis-induced lesions in the fox, using pathology and immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques. Seventy-one out of 163 Spirocerca vulpis-positive red foxes were selected and subjected to histopathological study. Lesions were classified as patchy or diffuse. Ten patchy and 10 diffuse lesion samples were studied using three IHC markers (CD68, CD3, and CD79α for macrophages, T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes, respectively) and H&E stain for neutrophils and eosinophils. Intensity of necrosis, hemorrhages, and the presence of collagen was also analyzed. Of the S. vulpis-positive red foxes, 96.9% had S. vulpis nodules localized in the gastric area (wall and/or omentum), and 3.1% had nodules in the small intestine. All the samples had a moderate to severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Mild eosinophil infiltration was observed in both types of lesions, while neutrophil infiltration was significatively higher in the patchy than in the diffuse lesions. Fibrosis with mature collagen fibers was also predominant in the patchy lesions along with the presence of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Both the patchy and diffuse patterns had very few B lymphocytes. These findings suggest that the diffuse form is an earlier stage of the lesion, which eventually evolves into patchy forms. Neoplastic forms were not seen. Although more studies are necessary, this study describes the lesions, characterizes the inflammatory infiltrates, and establishes a possible evolution of the different pathological forms of S. vulpis infection in the red fox.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/JWD-D-20-00162DOI Listing
November 2021

Association of myocardial parasitic load with cardiac biomarkers and other selected variables in 10 dogs with advanced Canine Leishmaniasis.

Vet Rec 2021 Sep 26;189(6):e198. Epub 2021 Apr 26.

Department of Animal Medicine and LeishmanCeres Laboratory, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.

Background: The association between myocardial parasitic load (MPL) and cardiac biomarkers in Canine Leishmaniasis (CanL) has not been studied.

Methods: Dogs with advanced CanL were prospectively recruited and were included if they were euthanised. Prior to euthanasia these variables were assessed: hematocrit, globulin, creatinine, N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), blood pressure, urine protein/creatinine ratio and echocardiographic parameters. A left ventricular (LV) sample was taken for histopathology and MPL evaluation by quantitative PCR. Correlation of MPL with all variables was analysed. Dogs with lower and higher histopathology scores were compared.

Results: Ten dogs were included. NT-proBNP was 6946 pmol/ (interquartile range [IQR] 3751-9268 pmol/L) and cTnI 4.56 ng/mL (IQR 0.46-13.1 ng/mL). In all dogs, echocardiography showed an increase in LV thickening, and histopathology revealed moderate to severe lympho-plasmocytic myocarditis and/or myocardial cell degeneration. MPL was 215.53 parasites/gram (IQR 21.2-1372.63 parasites/gram). A strong correlation (p < 0.001; R = 0.90; R 0.81) with cTnI was observed but correlation with any of the other variables or differences between the two histopathological scores, were not detected.

Conclusions: MPL in dogs with advanced CanL shows variable but generally high levels. A strong association between MPL and cTnI was observed, which encourages the exploration of cTnI as a marker in CanL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/vetr.198DOI Listing
September 2021

A Rare Case of a Primary Unilateral Low-Grade Paratesticular Leiomyosarcoma in a 2 Years Old Dog.

Front Vet Sci 2019 22;6:83. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Laboratory of Equine Reproduction and Equine Spermatology, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Caceres, Spain.

A 2 years old dog was brought to the clinic with complains of testicular enlargement. The tissue was diffusely affected as confirmed by ultrasonographic examination, being the right testicle atrophied and the right epididymis enlarged, with loss of echotexture and presence of several anechogenic areas. The situation required the excision of the referred testicle and epididymis. Final diagnose made by histopathological analysis was primary unilateral low-grade paratesticular leiomyosarcoma. Scarce bibliography is found on this matter, with several cases reported on human, and none in dog. This case report is therefore an important milestone on the area of small animal oncology directly related to the reproductive tissue.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2019.00083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6438921PMC
March 2019

Outbreaks of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella Choleraesuis in wild boars piglets from central-western Spain.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2019 Jan 10;66(1):225-233. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Facultad de Veterinaria, Unidad de Patología Infecciosa, Universidad de Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain.

Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is the aetiological agent of swine paratyphoid being a highly invasive zoonotic pathogen. Wild boar natural populations are experiencing a demographical expansion as well as some farms are breeding this species to release for hunting with management sometimes identical to that of domestic pigs, including supplementation, grouping, and antibiotic treatments. This situation increases the chance of contact between wild boars and livestock, and potentially induces stress, with different sanitary consequences. The present work aims to describe the clinical features of recent outbreaks caused by S. Choleraesuis in wild boar from central-western Spain, as well as the antimicrobial resistance and phylogenetic relationships of isolates involved. 28 strains of S. Choleraesuis were isolated from 28 different wild boars belonging to 10 different game states located in central western Spain and submitted to the Clinical Veterinary Hospital (CVH) of the University of Extremadura. Samples were taken from different organs and cultured according to the ISO 6579:2002 procedure. Suspicious colonies were identified by PCR and antimicrobial resistance was evaluated by disc diffusion susceptibility test and the presence of the main resistance genes as well as 18 plasmid replicons frequently found among the Enterobacteriaceae was verified by PCR. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was applied to determine the genetic relationship between isolates. The outbreaks under study were characterized by high mortality (35%-84%) and a septicaemic presentation. S. Choleraesuis was isolated from all the wild boars analysed, and 26 of the 28 isolates presented resistance to at least one antibiotic. The predominant resistances found were against sulphonamide, streptomycin, tetracycline, and doxicicline and sul1, strA-strB, and tetA were the most prevalent resistance genes among isolates. 10 strains carried FIIA, FIB+H/1 or FIIA+H/1 plasmids. PFGE classified the isolates into four different profiles, grouped into two clusters. This results show that prevention against S. Choleraesuis must be considered in the sanitary programs of the wild boar breeders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7168558PMC
January 2019

Involvement of stanniocalcins in the deregulation of glycaemia in obese mice and type 2 diabetic patients.

J Cell Mol Med 2018 01 9;22(1):684-694. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Department of Physiology (Phycell), Veterinary Faculty, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain.

Stanniocalcins are expressed in the pancreas tissue, and it was suggested a direct correlation between circulating insulin and STC2 concentrations in human. Here, we show a significant correlation between STC1 and both glycaemia and glycosylated haemoglobin among DM2 patients, while DM2 patients who present the greatest glycosylated haemoglobin values exhibited the lowest STC2 expression. However, treatment of patients with antiglycaemic drugs does not significantly modify the expression of both STCs. On the other hand, STC2 mice that exhibited neonatal and adult overweight further presented deregulated glycaemia when they were feed with a hypercaloric diet (breeding pellet, BP). This alteration is more evident at the early stages of the animal life. Deregulated glycaemia in these mice was confirmed using glucose oral test. In addition, STC2 mice present enhanced pancreas size; thus, the histological analysis reveals that WT mice respond to BP diet by increasing the size of the pancreatic islets through inducing cell division, and STC2 mice lack this compensatory mechanism. Contrary, BP fed STC2 mice show enhanced number of islets but of similar size than those fed with regular pellet. Histopathological analysis demonstrates tissue structure disruption and erythrocytes infiltrations in STC2 mice, possibly due to the stress evoked by the BP diet. Finally, enhanced glucagon immunostaining was observed in the islet of STC2 mice, and the glucagon ELISA assay confirmed the increase in the circulating glucagon. Summarizing, we present evidence of the role of STCs, mainly STC2, as a possible early marker during development of diabetes mellitus.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcmm.13355DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5742690PMC
January 2018

Congenital toxoplasmosis in wild boar (Sus scrofa) and identification of the Toxoplasma gondii types involved.

J Wildl Dis 2013 Oct;49(4):1019-23

1  Parasitology Section, Animal Health Department, Veterinary Faculty, University of Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad s/n, 10071, Cáceres, Spain.

Congenital toxoplasmosis has been little described in wild animals. We report a case of vertical transmission in wild boar (Sus scrofa). Necropsy and histopathologic examination of a pregnant female and her three fetuses revealed all to have lesions compatible with acute toxoplasmosis. Nested polymerase chain reaction B1 gene detected Toxoplasma gondii in maternal (heart and diaphragm) and fetal (central nervous system, retina, optic nerve, heart, lung, tongue, and diaphragm) samples. The mother had a mixed infection of T. gondii types I and III. One fetus with type III infection developed no malformations, but the others-one with type I infection and one infected by types I and III-showed bilateral ocular agenesis, prognathism, and agenesis of the nasal cartilage. These results suggest the pathogenicity of the various T. gondii types may differ in wild boars.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/2013-01-024DOI Listing
October 2013

Fatal infection due to Haemophilus parasuis in a young wild boar (Sus scrofa).

J Vet Diagn Invest 2013 Mar;25(2):297-300

Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain.

Haemophilus parasuis is a recognized pathogen in domestic pigs; the pathogen has been also isolated from healthy wild boar (Sus scrofa). In the current report, a case of fatal H. parasuis infection in a wild boar piglet from central Spain is described. The affected animal presented severe pneumonic lesions, inflammation in tarsal joints with presence of fibrinous deposits, and epidural hemorrhage in the atlanto-occipital joint. Pure growth of H. parasuis was obtained from lungs and tarsal joints. The current case illustrates the susceptibility of wild boar to this agent. The gross pathology results were similar to that described in domestic pigs, but there were no fibrinous deposits on serosal surfaces.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1040638713479348DOI Listing
March 2013

Leishmania major infection in susceptible and resistant mice elicit a differential humoral response against a total soluble fraction and defined recombinant antigens of the parasite.

Parasitol Res 2008 Apr 10;102(5):887-93. Epub 2008 Jan 10.

Unidad de Parasitología y Enfermedades Parasitarias, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 10.071, Cáceres, Spain.

In the present work, we analyzed the humoral response of Leishmania major experimentally infected BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice against three Leishmania antigens: total soluble antigen (soluble leishmania antigen(SLA)), a chimerical recombinant protein formed by the genetic fusion of four cytoplasmic proteins (PQ), and a kinetoplastic membrane protein (Kmp-11). We determined the correlation between the immune response against these proteins and the histopathological changes induced in the susceptible and resistant mice after infection. The data showed the existence of wide differences in the recognition of SLA, PQ, and Kmp-11 by the sera from both strains. The anti-SLA titer of BALB/c was 100 times higher than that of C57BL/6 mice. Antibodies against the recombinant Kmp-11 were detected only in infected BALB/c during the first stage of the infection. In contrast, the PQ protein was recognized by the sera from infected BALB/c mice but exclusively when they were in a late-lesion period. The data suggest that the response against the membrane Kmp-11 protein is transient and correlates with early developmental stages of the infection, whereas the response against cytoplasmic proteins as those present in PQ is sustained and could be considered as a marker of an advanced stage of the infection and disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-007-0844-9DOI Listing
April 2008
-->