Dr. Ludmilla Aristilde, PhD - Cornell University - Assistant Professor

Dr. Ludmilla Aristilde

PhD

Cornell University

Assistant Professor

Ithaca, NY | United States

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Environmental Chemistry; Environmental Biochemistry; Environmental Engineering.

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-8566-1486

Dr. Ludmilla Aristilde, PhD - Cornell University - Assistant Professor

Dr. Ludmilla Aristilde

PhD
Introduction

Ludmilla Aristilde is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. Dr. Aristilde completed a B.S. in Science of Earth Systems at Cornell University and obtained her M.S. in Environmental Engineering and Ph.D. in Molecular Toxicology at the University of California-Berkeley. After Berkeley, she went to Grenoble (France) as a Fulbright Scholar to advance her study of contaminant trapping in environmental matrices. Prior to starting her faculty position at Cornell in 2012, she spent three years as a NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at Princeton University where she studied molecular biology tools to address problems at the interface of environmental chemistry and biological processes.

Primary Affiliation: Cornell University - Ithaca, NY , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Metrics

26

Publications

1106

Profile Views

325

Reads

26

PubMed Central Citations

Education
Aug 2008
University of California-Berkeley
Ph.D.
Dec 2004
University of California-Berkeley
M.S.
May 2003
Cornell University
B.S.
Experience
Cornell University
Assistant Professor
Top co-authors
Garrison Sposito
Garrison Sposito

University of California

4
Laurent Charlet
Laurent Charlet

Université Grenoble Alpes

3
Bruno Lanson
Bruno Lanson

University of Grenoble Alpes

3
Hua Wei
Hua Wei

State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology

2
Claire Marichal
Claire Marichal

Université de Strasbourg (UdS)

2
Thalia G Aoki
Thalia G Aoki

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

2
Sabrina E Kelch
Sabrina E Kelch

School of Integrative Plant Science

2
Junyoung O Park
Junyoung O Park

Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics

1
Ian A Lewis
Ian A Lewis

University of Calgary

1

Publications

26Publications

325Reads

26PubMed Central Citations

Quantitation of carbohydrate monomers and dimers by liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

Carbohydr Res 2018 Oct 12;468:30-35. Epub 2018 Aug 12.

Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
October 2018
12 Reads
1.93 Impact Factor

Structures and mechanisms in clay nanopore trapping of structurally-different fluoroquinolone antimicrobials.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2018 Mar 8;513:367-378. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; Soil and Crop Sciences, School of Integrative Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
March 2018
18 Reads
3.37 Impact Factor

Profiling glucose-induced selective inhibition of disaccharide catabolism in Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 by stable isotope labelling.

Microbiology 2017 Oct 28;163(10):1509-1514. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

2​Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.

View Article
October 2017
9 Reads
2.56 Impact Factor

Degradation and metabolism of synthetic plastics and associated products by Pseudomonas sp.: capabilities and challenges.

J Appl Microbiol 2017 Sep 31;123(3):582-593. Epub 2017 May 31.

Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.

View Article
September 2017
14 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
2.48 Impact Factor

Sugar-influenced water diffusion, interaction, and retention in clay interlayer nanopores probed by theoretical simulations and experimental spectroscopies

Ludmilla Aristilde , Stephen M. Galdi , Sabrina E. Kelch , Thalia G. Aoki , Sugar-Influenced Water Diffusion, Interaction, and Retention in Clay Interlayer Nanopores Probed by Theoretical Simulations and Experimental Spectroscopies, Advances in Water Resources (2017), doi: 10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.0

Advances in Water Resources

View Article
March 2017
12 Reads

Molecular dynamics of stability and structures in phytochelatin complexes with Zn, Cu, Fe, Mg and Ca: Implications for metal detoxification

Environmental Chemistry Letters

Phytochelatins or (γ–glutamyl-cysteine)n-glycine are specialized peptides produced by plants and algae to mitigate toxic metal exposure. Previous experimental studies have reported biological production of these peptides specifically in response to high levels of heavy metals including Cu, Cd, and Zn. Stability constants and structural characterization of metal-phytochelatin complexes are largely lacking. This information is required to gain mechanistic insights on the metal selectivity of phytochelatins. Here we elucidate structural coordination in concert with thermodynamic stability predictions by performing molecular dynamics simulations of a fully hydrated phytochelatin molecule complexed with Ca, Mg, Fe(II), Zn(II), and Cu(II). Our molecular dynamics results predicted the following order for the thermodynamic stability of the different complexes: Zn(II) ≥ Cu(II) ≥ Fe(II) > Mg > Ca. Shorter binding distances and greater coordination from carboxylate and carbonyl O atoms explained the favorable binding energies with Zn(II) and Cu(II) over the other metal cations. Conformational re-arrangement of phytochelatin following metal chelation was captured by monitoring changes in the solvent-accessible volume. Accessibility of solvent molecules to the phytochelatin structure was inversely proportional to the distance between the coordinated ligands and the chelated metal. These new findings demonstrate the influence of the metal-phytochelatin structure on the metal binding thermodynamics and the phytochelatin conformation, both of which are important to evaluating the intracellular role of phytochelatin in mediating algal response to toxic heavy metal exposure.

View Article
February 2017
37 Reads

Metabolite labelling reveals hierarchies in Clostridium acetobutylicum that selectively channel carbons from sugar mixtures towards biofuel precursors.

Microb Biotechnol 2017 01 22;10(1):162-174. Epub 2016 Nov 22.

Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.

View Article
January 2017
10 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)

Solubility, structure, and morphology in the co-precipitation of cadmium and zinc with calcium-oxalate.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2017 Jan 30;486:309-315. Epub 2016 Sep 30.

Soil and Crop Sciences Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
January 2017
20 Reads
3.37 Impact Factor

Adsorption mechanisms of microcystin variant conformations at water-mineral interfaces: A molecular modeling investigation.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2016 Oct 9;480:166-174. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

The Institute for Comparative and Environmental Toxicology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States; Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States. Electronic address:

View Article
October 2016
25 Reads
3.37 Impact Factor

Éloge de la méthode: A tribute to Garrison Sposito on the occasion of his retirement

Charlet L, Baham J, Giraldez JV, Lo W, Aristilde L and Baveye PC (2016) Éloge de la Méthode: A Tribute to Garrison Sposito on the Occasion of His Retirement. Front. Environ. Sci. 4:73. doi: 10.3389/fenvs.2016.00073

Frontiers in Environmental Science

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00073/full#

View Article
October 2016
18 Reads

Ethanol production in syngas-fermenting Clostridium ljungdahlii is controlled by thermodynamics rather than by enzyme expression

Energy and Environmental Science

Acetogenic bacteria are attracting interest as biocatalysts in the biotechnology industry, since they are able to ferment carbon monoxide (CO)-rich gases. Wild-type strains produce mainly acetate and ethanol, but genetic modifications have already broadened the product portfolio. To enhance the production of intrinsic or heterologous biochemicals, knowledge on the microbial physiology is necessary. This physiology includes two different phases: acidogenesis (growth/acetate production) and solventogenesis (starvation/ethanol production). We operated two sequential, continuous bioreactors with a pure culture of Clostridium ljungdahlii to achieve steady-state conditions in an acetate- and an ethanol-producing stage to spatially separate acidogenesis and solventogenesis. Here, nearly 2000 proteins and their differential abundances between acidogenesis and solventogenesis were identified. In addition, we measured important metabolites. The results showed that nutrient-limited conditions triggered a transition to solventogenesis without altering the differential abundances of enzymes in the central energy metabolism. Our proteomics results revealed that the enzymes for ethanol production (AOR/ADH) were consistently abundant, even during acidogenesis. Based on this work, we developed an overflow model with thermodynamic rather than genetic regulation. The model identifies acetic acid and reduced cofactors as the saturation reactants. When the intracellular concentration of undissociated acetic acid reaches a thermodynamic threshold, C. ljungdahlii will be able to shunt surplus reducing equivalents toward ethanol immediately. This is important during retarded growth, when reducing equivalents can no longer be shunted toward biomass production, while the supply of CO-rich gas is still high. Nutrient availability and pH can be manipulated to achieve the desirable level of solventogenesis during bioprocessing.

View Article
May 2016
20 Reads

Enhanced interlayer trapping of a tetracycline antibiotic within montmorillonite layers in the presence of Ca and Mg.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2016 Feb 14;464:153-9. Epub 2015 Nov 14.

Institut des Sciences de la Terre, ISTerre, Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble, France.

View Article
February 2016
20 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
3.37 Impact Factor

Bypasses in intracellular glucose metabolism in iron-limited Pseudomonas putida.

Microbiologyopen 2016 Feb 16;5(1):3-20. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14853.

View Article
February 2016
16 Reads
3 PubMed Central Citations(source)

Short-time dynamics of pH-dependent conformation and substrate binding in the active site of beta-glucosidases: A computational study.

J Struct Biol 2015 Sep 6;191(3):352-64. Epub 2015 Jul 6.

The Institute for Comparative and Environmental Toxicology, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA; Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
September 2015
17 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
3.23 Impact Factor

Structural characterization of multiple pyoverdines secreted by two Pseudomonas strains using liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry with varying dissociation energies.

Anal Bioanal Chem 2015 Jun 21;407(16):4629-38. Epub 2015 Apr 21.

Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.

View Article
June 2015
17 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
3.44 Impact Factor

Hierarchy in pentose sugar metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2015 Feb;81(4):1452-62

View Article
February 2015
17 Reads
7 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.67 Impact Factor

Complexes of the antimicrobial ciprofloxacin with soil, peat, and aquatic humic substances.

Environ Toxicol Chem 2013 Jul 15;32(7):1467-78. Epub 2013 May 15.

Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.

View Article
July 2013
23 Reads
3 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.23 Impact Factor

Interstratification patterns from the pH-dependent intercalation of a tetracycline antibiotic within montmorillonite layers.

Langmuir 2013 Apr 25;29(14):4492-501. Epub 2013 Mar 25.

Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850, USA.

View Article
April 2013
14 Reads
4.46 Impact Factor

Weak organic ligands enhance zinc uptake in marine phytoplankton.

Environ Sci Technol 2012 May 26;46(10):5438-45. Epub 2012 Apr 26.

Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, United States.

View Article
May 2012
19 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
5.33 Impact Factor

Interactions of oxytetracycline with a smectite clay: a spectroscopic study with molecular simulations.

Environ Sci Technol 2010 Oct;44(20):7839-45

Environmental Geochemistry Group, LGIT, University of Grenoble-1, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble, France.

View Article
October 2010
17 Reads
3 PubMed Central Citations(source)
5.33 Impact Factor

Inhibition of photosynthesis by a fluoroquinolone antibiotic.

Environ Sci Technol 2010 Feb;44(4):1444-50

Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, and Division of Ecosystem Sciences, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

View Article
February 2010
20 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
5.33 Impact Factor

Binding of ciprofloxacin by humic substances: a molecular dynamics study.

Environ Toxicol Chem 2010 Jan;29(1):90-8

Molecular Toxicology Group, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-3104, USA.

View Article
January 2010
18 Reads
3.23 Impact Factor

Molecular modeling of metal complexation by a fluoroquinolone antibiotic.

Environ Toxicol Chem 2008 Nov;27(11):2304-10

Molecular Toxicology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-3114, USA.

View Article
November 2008
19 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
3.23 Impact Factor
Top co-authors
Garrison Sposito
Garrison Sposito

University of California

4
Laurent Charlet
Laurent Charlet

Université Grenoble Alpes

3
Bruno Lanson
Bruno Lanson

University of Grenoble Alpes

3
Hua Wei
Hua Wei

State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology

2
Claire Marichal
Claire Marichal

Université de Strasbourg (UdS)

2
Thalia G Aoki
Thalia G Aoki

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

2
Sabrina E Kelch
Sabrina E Kelch

School of Integrative Plant Science

2
Junyoung O Park
Junyoung O Park

Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics

1
Ian A Lewis
Ian A Lewis

University of Calgary

1