Publications by authors named "Ludmila De Faria"

5 Publications

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Cannabis Legalization and College Mental Health.

Curr Psychiatry Rep 2021 Mar 3;23(4):17. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

College Mental Health Program, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

Purpose Of Review: To assess how the changing landscape of marijuana use affects the developing brain and mental health of college students.

Recent Findings: Legalization of cannabis may facilitate use in the college population, with 38% of college students, whose brains are still maturing, regularly using marijuana products. Earlier and increased use, higher potency, pre-existing issues, and genetic predispositions increase negative outcomes by precipitating or worsening mental illness and ultimately impacting academic success. In the USA, the sharpest increase in cannabis users following legalization has been in the college age population (18-25 years of age). This population is especially vulnerable to the negative impacts and risks associated with cannabis use, including risk for the onset of major psychiatric illness. College mental health practitioners should remain informed about health effects of cannabis use, assess patient use on a regular basis, provide education and be familiar with interventions to reduce harm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11920-021-01231-1DOI Listing
March 2021

Associations between social determinants of health, perceived discrimination, and body mass index on symptoms of depression among young African American mothers.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs 2021 02 25;35(1):94-101. Epub 2020 Nov 25.

Columbia University School of Nursing and Center for Research on People of Color, 560 W 168th Street, Room 605, New York, New York 10032, United States of America. Electronic address:

Purpose: The association between symptoms of depression and risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains equivocal for African American (AA) mothers. We examined the association between social determinants of health (perceived discrimination), and cardiovascular risk (BMI) on symptoms of depression in a sample of young AA mothers.

Methods: Secondary data from 219 adult AA mothers between the ages of 21 and 46 with an average BMI of 29.8 and yearly family income of $14,999 were analyzed using a latent growth model that evaluated four time points to assess changes in symptoms of depression.

Results: Initial BMI was significantly associated with initial symptoms of depression (b = 0.12, p = .019). Perceived discrimination (unfair treatment) was associated with higher initial symptoms of depression (b = 1.14, p = .017).

Conclusion: The findings suggest that elevated BMI and perceived discrimination are associated with higher reported symptoms of depression among young, socioeconomically disadvantaged AA mothers. These results advance the scientific understanding of young AA mothers' risk for symptoms of depression and CVD by elucidating the impact of perceived discrimination and social experiences on mental health. Further studies of SDoH and CVD risk factors and perceived racism and depression are needed to shed light on the long-term mental health impact on AA mothers and their children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2020.09.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7890049PMC
February 2021

The Impact of Paid Maternity Leave on the Mental and Physical Health of Mothers and Children: A Review of the Literature and Policy Implications.

Harv Rev Psychiatry 2020 Mar/Apr;28(2):113-126

From the Department of Psychiatry, Weill Institute for Neurosciences (Mr. Riano and Dr. Mangurian), and Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies (Dr. Mangurian), University of California, San Francisco; Florida State University College of Medicine (Dr. de Faria); Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Dr. Catapano-Friedman); Yale University School of Medicine (Drs. Ravven and Budde); San Mateo County Psychiatry Residency Training Program (Dr. Weissman); Columbia University School of Medicine (Dr. Nzodom); Stanford University School of Medicine (Dr. Alexander).

For decades, national paid maternity leave policies of 12 weeks or more have been established in every industrialized country except the United States. Despite women representing 47% of the current U.S. labor force, only 16% of all employed American workers have access to paid parental leave through their workplace. As many as 23% of employed mothers return to work within ten days of giving birth, because of their inability to pay living expenses without income. We reviewed recent studies on the possible effects of paid maternity leave on the mental and physical health of mothers and children. We found that paid maternity leave is associated with beneficial effects on (1) the mental health of mothers and children, including a decrease in postpartum maternal depression and intimate partner violence, and improved infant attachment and child development, (2) the physical health of mothers and children, including a decrease in infant mortality and in mother and infant rehospitalizations, and an increase in pediatric visit attendance and timely administration of infant immunizations, and (3) breastfeeding, with an increase in its initiation and duration. Given the substantial mental and physical health benefits associated with paid leave, as well as favorable results from studies on its economic impact, the United States is facing a clear, evidence-based mandate to create a national paid maternity leave policy. We recommend a national paid maternity leave policy of at least 12 weeks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HRP.0000000000000246DOI Listing
March 2020

Adjunctive risperidone treatment and sleep symptoms in combat veterans with chronic PTSD.

Depress Anxiety 2006 ;23(8):489-91

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33125, USA.

Sleep disturbances are core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are often resistant to treatment. One reason for the recent use of atypical antipsychotics in PTSD appears to be their effects on sleep. Study objectives were (1) to evaluate preliminarily the sleep effects of adjunctive risperidone, and (2) to evaluate the use of sleep diaries versus the more standard retrospective sleep assessments. This was a pilot, open-label, 12-week, flexible-dose trial of adjunctive risperidone in male veterans with a primary diagnosis of chronic, combat-related PTSD, partially responsive to current medications. Diagnostic interviews were administered at baseline, and PTSD ratings were obtained at baseline and at 6 and 12 weeks. Self-report sleep measures, including morning logs, were obtained at baseline and 6 weeks. Seventeen patients completed at least 6 weeks of the trial. Global ratings of sleep disturbance improved. Changes in frequency of awakenings and reductions in trauma-related dreams were only evident via morning log assessments. Nighttime awakening frequency derived from the sleep logs but not from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) decreased significantly. There were no changes in the PSQI nightmare item; however, sleep log data indicated a reduced proportion of traumatic dreams at 6 weeks. Preliminary results suggest that adjunctive risperidone may benefit sleep disturbances associated with chronic PTSD. Prospective logs may be more sensitive to change than are retrospective scales.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.20187DOI Listing
March 2007