Publications by authors named "Ludmila A Lokteva"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Functional Analysis of Orai1 Concatemers Supports a Hexameric Stoichiometry for the CRAC Channel.

Biophys J 2016 Nov;111(9):1897-1907

Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California; Graduate Program in Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. Electronic address:

Store-operated Ca entry occurs through the binding of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca sensor STIM1 to Orai1, the pore-forming subunit of the Ca release-activated Ca (CRAC) channel. Although the essential steps leading to channel opening have been described, fundamental questions remain, including the functional stoichiometry of the CRAC channel. The crystal structure of Drosophila Orai indicates a hexameric stoichiometry, while studies of linked Orai1 concatemers and single-molecule photobleaching suggest that channels assemble as tetramers. We assessed CRAC channel stoichiometry by expressing hexameric concatemers of human Orai1 and comparing in detail their ionic currents to those of native CRAC channels and channels generated from monomeric Orai1 constructs. Cell surface biotinylation results indicated that Orai1 channels in the plasma membrane were assembled from intact hexameric polypeptides and not from truncated protein products. In addition, the L273D mutation depressed channel activity equally regardless of which Orai1 subunit in the concatemer carried the mutation. Thus, functional channels were generated from intact Orai1 hexamers in which all subunits contributed equally. These hexameric Orai1 channels displayed the biophysical fingerprint of native CRAC channels, including the distinguishing characteristics of gating (store-dependent activation, Ca-dependent inactivation, open probability), permeation (ion selectivity, affinity for Ca block, La sensitivity, unitary current magnitude), and pharmacology (enhancement and inhibition by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate). Because permeation characteristics depend strongly on pore geometry, it is unlikely that hexameric and tetrameric pores would display identical Ca affinity, ion selectivity, and unitary current magnitude. Thus, based on the highly similar pore properties of the hexameric Orai1 concatemer and native CRAC channels, we conclude that the CRAC channel functions as a hexamer of Orai1 subunits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2016.09.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5103002PMC
November 2016

Suppression of inflammation with conditional deletion of the prostaglandin E2 EP2 receptor in macrophages and brain microglia.

J Neurosci 2013 Oct;33(40):16016-32

Departments of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Microbiology and Immunology, and Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, Neurosciences Graduate Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, and Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, California 94025.

Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent lipid signaling molecule, modulates inflammatory responses through activation of downstream G-protein coupled EP(1-4) receptors. Here, we investigated the cell-specific in vivo function of PGE2 signaling through its E-prostanoid 2 (EP2) receptor in murine innate immune responses systemically and in the CNS. In vivo, systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in a broad induction of cytokines and chemokines in plasma that was significantly attenuated in EP2-deficient mice. Ex vivo stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with LPS elicited proinflammatory responses that were dependent on EP2 signaling and that overlapped with in vivo plasma findings, suggesting that myeloid-lineage EP2 signaling is a major effector of innate immune responses. Conditional deletion of the EP2 receptor in myeloid lineage cells in Cd11bCre;EP2(lox/lox) mice attenuated plasma inflammatory responses and transmission of systemic inflammation to the brain was inhibited, with decreased hippocampal inflammatory gene expression and cerebral cortical levels of IL-6. Conditional deletion of EP2 significantly blunted microglial and astrocytic inflammatory responses to the neurotoxin MPTP and reduced striatal dopamine turnover. Suppression of microglial EP2 signaling also increased numbers of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra independent of MPTP treatment, suggesting that microglial EP2 may influence development or survival of DA neurons. Unbiased microarray analysis of microglia isolated from adult Cd11bCre;EP2(lox/lox) and control mice demonstrated a broad downregulation of inflammatory pathways with ablation of microglial EP2 receptor. Together, these data identify a cell-specific proinflammatory role for macrophage/microglial EP2 signaling in innate immune responses systemically and in brain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2203-13.2013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3787507PMC
October 2013

Dual degradation signals control Gli protein stability and tumor formation.

Genes Dev 2006 Feb 18;20(3):276-81. Epub 2006 Jan 18.

Program in Epithelial Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Regulated protein destruction controls many key cellular processes with aberrant regulation increasingly found during carcinogenesis. Gli proteins mediate the transcriptional effects of the Sonic hedgehog pathway, which is implicated in up to 25% of human tumors. Here we show that Gli is rapidly destroyed by the proteasome and that mouse basal cell carcinoma induction correlates with Gli protein accumulation. We identify two independent destruction signals in Gli1, D(N) and D(C), and show that removal of these signals stabilizes Gli1 protein and rapidly accelerates tumor formation in transgenic animals. These data argue that control of Gli protein accumulation underlies tumorigenesis and suggest a new avenue for antitumor therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gad.1380906DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1361699PMC
February 2006