Publications by authors named "Lucky Poh Wah Goh"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Review of and : A High Potential Supplement.

Molecules 2021 Nov 19;26(22). Epub 2021 Nov 19.

Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, UMS Road, Kota Kinabalu 88400, Sabah, Malaysia.

() and () are tropical fruits that gain popularity worldwide due to their tastiness. Currently, their potential to be used as pharmaceutical agents is underestimated. Chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes and aging have high incidence rates in the modern world. Furthermore, pharmaceutical agents targeting pathogenic microorganisms have been hampered by the growing of antimicrobial resistance threats. The idea of food therapy leads to extensive nutraceuticals research on the potential of exotic fruits such as and to act as supplements. Phytochemicals such as phenolic compounds that present in the fruit act as potent antioxidants that contribute to the protective effects against diseases induced by oxidative stress. Fruit residuals such as the peel and seeds hold greater nutraceutical potential than the edible part. This review highlights the antioxidant and biological activities (anti-neoplastic, anti-microbial, hypoglycemic actions and anti-aging), and chemical contents of different parts of and . These fruits contain a diverse and important chemical profile that can alleviate or cure diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26227005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8620321PMC
November 2021

Draft genome sequence data of sp. FH025.

Data Brief 2021 Jun 12;36:107128. Epub 2021 May 12.

Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. Malaysia.

The genome data of sp. FH025 comprised of 8,381,474 bp with a high GC content of 72.51%. The genome contains 7035 coding sequences spanning 1261 contigs. sp. FH025 contains 57 secondary metabolite gene clusters including polyketide synthase, nonribosomal polyketide synthase and other biosynthetic pathways such as amglyccycl, butyrolactone, terpenes, siderophores, lanthipeptide-class-iv, and ladderane. 16S rRNA analysis of sp. FH025 is similar to the genus. This whole genome project has been deposited at NCBI under the accession JAFLNG000000000.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2021.107128DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8166745PMC
June 2021

A Review: Underutilized plant of Sabah and Its Potential Value.

Curr Pharm Biotechnol 2021 Feb 8. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, University Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, . Malaysia.

Underutilized plants are referred to a plant species which their potential is not fully utilized yet and they are usually found abundantly in certain local area but globally rare. Sabah is known for a high biodiversity and contains many underutilized plants. To our knowledge, this is the first review is to provide an overview information of medicinal value and pharmacological properties of underutilized plant in Sabah. Extract and metabolites in different part of several underutilized plant contains multiple beneficial bioactive compounds and exploitation of these compounds was supported by additional data which plays various biological activities including anti-atherosclerotic, anti-cancer, antihypercholesterolemic and anti-ulcerogenic. A handful of pharmacological studies on the natural product these underutilized plants have conclusively outlined the mode of action in treatment of several diseases and in other health aspects. This paper limits its scope to reviewe and highlight the potential of using underutilized plants in Sabah only which could serve as reliable resource for health product development in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical through continuous discovering of more active and sustainable resources as well as ingredients for food and medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389201022666210208201212DOI Listing
February 2021

Prevalence of Alpha(α)-Thalassemia in Southeast Asia (2010-2020): A Meta-Analysis Involving 83,674 Subjects.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 10 9;17(20). Epub 2020 Oct 9.

Biotechnology Programme, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu 88400, Sabah, Malaysia.

Alpha(α)-thalassemia is a blood disorder caused by many types of inheritable α-globin gene mutations which causes no-to-severe clinical symptoms, such as Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis that leads to early foetal death. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to provide an update from year 2010 to 2020 on the prevalence of α-thalassemia in Southeast Asia. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed and SCOPUS databases for related studies published from 2010 to 2020, based on specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Heterogeneity of included studies was examined with the I2 index and Q-test. Funnel plots and Egger's tests were performed in order to determine publication bias in this meta-analysis. Twenty-nine studies with 83,674 subjects were included and pooled prevalence rates in this meta-analysis were calculated using random effect models based on high observed heterogeneity (I2 > 99.5, -value < 0.1). Overall, the prevalence of α-thalassemia is 22.6%. The highest α-thalassemia prevalence was observed in Vietnam (51.5%) followed by Cambodia (39.5%), Laos (26.8%), Thailand (20.1%), and Malaysia (17.3%). No publication bias was detected. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggested that a high prevalence of α-thalassemia occurred in selected Southeast Asia countries. This meta-analysis data are useful for designing thalassemia screening programs and improve the disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207354DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7600098PMC
October 2020

Variant Alleles in XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln Polymorphisms Increase Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancer in Sabah, North Borneo.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2016 ;17(4):1925-31

Biotechnology Programme, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia E-mail :

Background: The XRCC1 protein facilitates various DNA repair pathways; single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this gene are associated with a risk of gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) with inconsistent results, but no data have been previously reported for the Sabah, North Borneo, population. We accordingly investigated the XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln SNPs in terms of GIC risk in Sabah.

Materials And Methods: We performed genotyping for both SNPs for 250 GIC patients and 572 healthy volunteers using a polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism approach. We validated heterozygosity and homozygosity for both SNPs using direct sequencing.

Results: The presence of a variant 194Trp allele in the Arg194Trp SNP was significantly associated with a higher risk of GIC, especially with gastric and colorectal cancers. We additionally found that the variant 399Gln allele in Arg399Gln SNP was associated with a greater risk of developing gastric cancer. Our combined analysis revealed that inheritance of variant alleles in both SNPs increased the GIC risk in Sabah population. Based on our etiological analysis, we found that subjects ≥50 years and males who carrying the variant 194Trp allele, and Bajau subjects carrying the 399Gln allele had a significantly increased risk of GIC.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that inheritance of variant alleles in XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln SNPs may act as biomarkers for the early detection of GIC, especially for gastric and colorectal cancers in the Sabah population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2016.17.4.1925DOI Listing
January 2017

Association of CYP2E1, STK15 and XRCC1 Polymorphisms with Risk of Breast Cancer in Malaysian Women.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2016 ;17(2):647-53

Biotechnology Programme, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia E-mail :

Background: Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting Malaysian women. Recent statistics revealed that the cumulative probability of breast cancer and related deaths in Malaysia is higher than in most of the countries of Southeast Asia. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP2E1 (rs6413432 and rs3813867), STK15 (rs2273535 and rs1047972) and XRCC1 (rs1799782 and rs25487) have been associated with breast cancer risk in a meta-analysis but any link in Southeast Asia, including Malaysia, remained to be determined. Hence, we investigated the relationship between these SNPs and breast cancer risk among Malaysian women in the present case-control study.

Materials And Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 71 breast cancer patients and 260 healthy controls and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis.

Results: Our study showed that the c1/c2 genotype or subjects with at least one c2 allele in CYP2E1 rs3813867 SNP had significantly increased almost 1.8-fold higher breast cancer risk in Malaysian women overall. In addition, the variant Phe allele in STK15 rs2273535 SNP appeared to protect against breast cancer in Malaysian Chinese. No significance association was found between XRCC1 SNPs and breast cancer risk in the population.

Conclusions: This study provides additional knowledge on CYP2E1, STK15 and XRCC1 SNP impact of risk of breast cancer, particularly in the Malaysian population. From our findings, we also recommend Malaysian women to perform breast cancer screening before 50 years of age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2016.17.2.647DOI Listing
January 2017

Significant genotype difference in the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism of indigenous groups in Sabah, Malaysia with Asian and non-Asian populations.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(17):7377-81

Biotechnology Programme, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia E-mail :

CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism G-1259C (rs3813867) genotype distributions vary significantly among different populations and are associated with both diseases, like cancer, and adverse drug effects. To date, there have been limited genotype distributions and allele frequencies of this polymorphism reported in the three major indigenous ethnic groups (KadazanDusun, Bajau, and Rungus) in Sabah, also known as North Borneo. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism G-1259C in these three major indigenous peoples in Sabah. A total of 640 healthy individuals from the three dominant indigenous groups were recruited for this study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at G-1259C polymorphic site of CYP2E1 gene was performed using the Pst I restriction enzyme. Fragments were analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis and confirmed by direct sequencing. Overall, the allele frequencies were 90.3% for c1 allele and 9.7% for c2 allele. The genotype frequencies for c1/c1, c1/c2 and c2/c2 were observed as 80.9%, 18.8%, and 0.3%, respectively. A highly statistical significant difference (p<0.001) was observed in the genotype distributions between indigenous groups in Sabah with all Asian and non-Asian populations. However, among these three indigenous groups, there was no statistical significant difference (p>0.001) in their genotype distributions. The three major indigenous ethnic groups in Sabah show unique genotype distributions when compared with other populations. This finding indicates the importance of establishing the genotype distributions of CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism in the indigenous populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.17.7377DOI Listing
June 2015
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