Publications by authors named "Lucinda S Buescher"

5 Publications

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Syphilis in the United States.

Clin Dermatol 2014 Mar-Apr;32(2):213-8

Division of Dermatology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois. Electronic address:

Syphilis gained notoriety in the 1500s, when it became widespread throughout Europe. While the origins of syphilis are not certain, recent data have shown that it may have originated in the Americas from a close relative that causes Yaws (Treponema pallidum pertenue).(1) For the past 500years, the disease has shown its various faces all over the world. The 19th century saw an entire medical subspecialty-syphilology (sometimes known as syphilography)-devoted to the study of the great disease, then known as "the great imitator." Syphilis has an entire textbook of presentations and can mimic many other infections and immune-mediated processes. At the beginning of the 20th century, the many faces of the disease led to Sir William Osler's well-known aphorism, "The physician who knows syphilis knows medicine."(2) When penicillin was discovered, and used to treat syphilis in 1943, some thought that syphilis would go by the wayside, but syphilis continued what it has been doing for so many years . . . inconspicuously infecting humans. The United States has seen the incidence of syphilis increase numerous times throughout the past 70years. Every decrease in the incidence of syphilis is followed shortly by an increase. A marked shift in the epidemiology occurred from 1990 to 2000. In the 1990s, syphilis primarily occurred in heterosexual minority groups. In the new millennium, a majority of cases of syphilis are now transmitted among men who have sex with men (MSM).(3) This contribution discusses the incidence of syphilis in the United States and the reasons these trends continue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2013.08.005DOI Listing
November 2014

Body dysmorphic disorder.

Dermatol Clin 2006 Apr;24(2):251-7, vii

Division of Dermatology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine,and Psychological Services of Central Illinois, Springfield, IL 62794-9644, USA.

Body dysmorphic disorder is a relatively common psychiatric disorder among the dermatology patient population. These individuals may present to dermatologists for treatment of normal or minimally abnormal skin findings. Recognizing that these patients have body dysmorphic disorder can avert unnecessary and potentially unsuccessful treatments. Understanding and directing patients toward appropriate treatment options can minimize the distress and morbidities associated with the disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2006.01.008DOI Listing
April 2006

Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome: two cases and a review of the literature.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2006 May;54(5):855-65

Division of Dermatology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA.

Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (HIES) is a rare immunodeficiency associated with elevated serum IgE levels, eczematous skin, recurrent cutaneous infections, and distinctive musculoskeletal features. We report two cases seen at our institution and review the current literature. Patient 1 was an 18-month-old African American boy with recurrent staphylococcal cold abscesses, pneumonia, and bacteremia. He had severely eczematous skin, ultimately complicated by eczema herpeticum. After treatment of systemic infections with culture-directed antibiotics, a brief course of cyclosporine, 5 mg/kg, improved the dermatitis and allowed transition to long-term therapy with oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Patient 2 was a 15-year-old Caucasian boy with long-standing HIES. He has been maintained on a regimen of interferon gamma injections given 3 times weekly and monthly intravenous immunoglobulin since the age of 3 years, prophylactic antibiotics, and low-dose fluconazole. He has occasional episodes of cold abscesses and sinusitis, but has had excellent control since institution of this regimen and has not experienced any adverse effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2005.10.022DOI Listing
May 2006

Life-threatening paraneoplastic cutaneous syndromes.

Clin Dermatol 2005 May-Jun;23(3):301-6

Division of Dermatology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, 55026, USA.

Paraneoplastic syndromes are diseases or symptom complexes associated with malignancy, usually internal. In dermatology, we modify the definition to refer to dermatoses associated with internal malignancy. In this article, we discuss the link between malignancy and such dermatologic disorders as acanthosis nigricans, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica of Bazex, dermatomyositis, erythema gyratum repens, necrolytic migratory erythema (glucagonoma syndrome), and paraneoplastic pemphigus and discuss, where such information is known, the mechanism by which these paraneoplastic diseases occur.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2004.06.011DOI Listing
September 2005