Publications by authors named "Luciano Paganucci de Queiroz"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Revisiting the taxonomy of and related genera (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae), with new generic circumscriptions.

PhytoKeys 2020 21;164:67-114. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44036-900, Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana Feira de Santana Brazil.

The Dioclea clade comprises four genera and aproximately 60 species of the tribe Diocleae: (4 species), (1), (ca. 50), (1) and (3-4). has been demonstrated to be a non-monophyletic genus, but low sampling in previous phylogenetic studies hampered the adoption of new taxonomic arrangements. We carried out densely sampled phylogenetic analyses of the Dioclea clade using molecular markers that had performed well in previous studies: the ITS and ETS nuclear ribosomal regions and the plastid . Our results support the maintenance of the genera and with their current circumscriptions, but confirmed the polyphyly of , with its species falling into three different positions: (1) the puzzling species, , was highly supported as a member of the Galactia clade; (2) Dioclea subg. Dioclea appeared as sister to a clade composed of and ; and (3) the species of subgenera and composed a paraphyletic grade nesting the genera and . We thus propose that the circumscription of should be restricted to Dioclea subg. Dioclea, with 13 species and that the limits of should be widened to include the genus , as well as the subgenera and , with 46 species. Taxonomic summaries, new combinations and synonyms are presented for all genera of the Dioclea clade. were retained in their original circumscriptions. We presented an illustrated taxonomic conspectus of all genera of the Dioclea clade including 44 new combinations, one new name, ten new synonyms, two re-established holotypes, 38 lectotypes, two epitypes and one neotype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.164.55441DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8359005PMC
October 2020

Exploration of Plastid Phylogenomic Conflict Yields New Insights into the Deep Relationships of Leguminosae.

Syst Biol 2020 07;69(4):613-622

Germplasm Bank of Wild Species, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China.

Phylogenomic analyses have helped resolve many recalcitrant relationships in the angiosperm tree of life, yet phylogenetic resolution of the backbone of the Leguminosae, one of the largest and most economically and ecologically important families, remains poor due to generally limited molecular data and incomplete taxon sampling of previous studies. Here, we resolve many of the Leguminosae's thorniest nodes through comprehensive analysis of plastome-scale data using multiple modified coding and noncoding data sets of 187 species representing almost all major clades of the family. Additionally, we thoroughly characterize conflicting phylogenomic signal across the plastome in light of the family's complex history of plastome evolution. Most analyses produced largely congruent topologies with strong statistical support and provided strong support for resolution of some long-controversial deep relationships among the early diverging lineages of the subfamilies Caesalpinioideae and Papilionoideae. The robust phylogenetic backbone reconstructed in this study establishes a framework for future studies on legume classification, evolution, and diversification. However, conflicting phylogenetic signal was detected and quantified at several key nodes that prevent the confident resolution of these nodes using plastome data alone. [Leguminosae; maximum likelihood; phylogenetic conflict; plastome; recalcitrant relationships; stochasticity; systematic error.].
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/syaa013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7302050PMC
July 2020

The genus (Leguminosae) in New Caledonia: two new species and a key for the species.

PhytoKeys 2019 20;119:53-66. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina s/n, 44031-460, Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana Feira de Santana Brazil.

M.Pignal & L.P.Queiroz, and M.Pignal & L.P.Queiroz, , two new species from New Caledonia, are described and illustrated. Both new species have been collected for a long time, but most herbarium specimens were named as the Australian species , even though they clearly stand apart from this species and the other New Caledonian species of the genus. can be diagnosed by the tall virgate shrubby habit, leaves with an articulate rachis and 7-11 widely obovate to orbiculate leaflets with greyish undersurface and almost invisible venation. can be recognized by the arborescent habit, leaves with 15-19 elliptical leaflets, small, c. 6 mm long flowers, and ellipsoid seeds. Preliminary IUCN assessments are provided for both species. A key is provided for all species of recorded from New Caledonia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.119.32221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437132PMC
March 2019

Atlantic forests to the all Americas: Biogeographical history and divergence times of Neotropical Ficus (Moraceae).

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2018 05 31;122:46-58. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Programa de Pós-graduação em Botânica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44.036-900, Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil.

Ficus (Moraceae) is well diversified in the Neotropics with two lineages inhabiting the wet forests of this region. The hemiepiphytes of section Americanae are the most diversified with c. 120 species, whereas section Pharmacosycea includes about 20 species mostly with a terrestrial habit. To reconstruct the biogeographical history and diversification of Ficus in the Americas, we produced a dated Bayesian phylogenetic hypothesis of Neotropical Ficus including two thirds of the species sequenced for five nuclear regions (At103, ETS, G3pdh, ITS/5.8S and Tpi). Ancestral range was estimated using all models available in Biogeobears and Binary State Speciation and Extinction analysis was used to evaluate the role of the initial habit and propagule size in diversification. The phylogenetic analyses resolved both Neotropical sections as monophyletic but the internal relationships between species in section Americanae remain unclear. Ficus started their diversification in the Neotropics between the Oligocene and Miocene. The genus experienced two bursts of diversification: in the middle Miocene and the Pliocene. Colonization events from the Amazon to adjacent areas coincide with the end of the Pebas system (10 Mya) and the connection of landmasses. Divergence of endemic species in the Atlantic forest is inferred to have happened after its isolation and the opening and consolidation of the Cerrado. Our results suggest a complex diversification in the Atlantic forest differing between postulated refuges and more instable areas in the South distribution of the forest. Finally the selection for initial hemiepiphytic habit and small to medium propagule size influenced the diversification and current distribution of the species at Neotropical forests marked by the historical instability and long-distance dispersal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.01.015DOI Listing
May 2018

Amazon plant diversity revealed by a taxonomically verified species list.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 10 18;114(40):10695-10700. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil.

Recent debates on the number of plant species in the vast lowland rain forests of the Amazon have been based largely on model estimates, neglecting published checklists based on verified voucher data. Here we collate taxonomically verified checklists to present a list of seed plant species from lowland Amazon rain forests. Our list comprises 14,003 species, of which 6,727 are trees. These figures are similar to estimates derived from nonparametric ecological models, but they contrast strongly with predictions of much higher tree diversity derived from parametric models. Based on the known proportion of tree species in neotropical lowland rain forest communities as measured in complete plot censuses, and on overall estimates of seed plant diversity in Brazil and in the neotropics in general, it is more likely that tree diversity in the Amazon is closer to the lower estimates derived from nonparametric models. Much remains unknown about Amazonian plant diversity, but this taxonomically verified dataset provides a valid starting point for macroecological and evolutionary studies aimed at understanding the origin, evolution, and ecology of the exceptional biodiversity of Amazonian forests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1706756114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5635885PMC
October 2017

A new generic system for the pantropical Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae).

PhytoKeys 2016 12(71):1-160. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology Department, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AB, United Kingdom.

The Caesalpinia group is a large pantropical clade of ca. 205 species in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae) in which generic delimitation has been in a state of considerable flux. Here we present new phylogenetic analyses based on five plastid and one nuclear ribosomal marker, with dense taxon sampling including 172 (84%) of the species and representatives of all previously described genera in the Caesalpinia group. These analyses show that the current classification of the Caesalpinia group into 21 genera needs to be revised. Several genera (, , and sensu Lewis, 2005) are non-monophyletic and several previously unclassified Asian species segregate into clades that merit recognition at generic rank. In addition, the near-completeness of our taxon sampling identifies three species that do not belong in any of the main clades and these are recognised as new monospecific genera. A new generic classification of the Caesalpinia group is presented including a key for the identification of genera, full generic descriptions, illustrations (drawings and photo plates of all genera), and (for most genera) the nomenclatural transfer of species to their correct genus. We recognise 26 genera, with reinstatement of two previously described genera ( Tod., R. Vig.), re-delimitation and expansion of several others (, , and ), contraction of s.s. and description of four new ones (, , and ), and make 75 new nomenclatural combinations in this new generic system.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.71.9203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5558824PMC
October 2016

A molecular phylogeny reveals the Cuban enigmatic genus Behaimia as a new piece in the Brongniartieae puzzle of papilionoid legumes.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2017 04 9;109:191-202. Epub 2017 Jan 9.

National Institute of Science and Technology in Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Studies in Ecology and Evolution (INCT IN-TREE), Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Barão de Jeremoabo, s.n., Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.

The papilionoid legume tribe Brongniartieae comprises a collection of 15 genera with disparate morphologies that were previously positioned in at least four remotely related tribes. The Brongniartieae displays a wide geographical disjunction between Australia and the New World and previous phylogenetic studies had provided conflicting results about the relationships between the American and Australian genera. We carry out phylogenetic analyses of (1) a plastid matK dataset extensively sampled across legumes to solve the enigmatic relationship of the Cuban-endemic monospecific genus Behaimia; and (2) multilocus datasets with focus on all genera ever referred to Brongniartieae. These analyses resulted in a well-resolved and strongly-supported phylogenetic tree of the Brongniartieae. The monophyly of all American genera of Brongniartieae is strongly supported. The doubtful position of the Australian genus Plagiocarpus is resolved within a clade comprising all Australian genera. Behaimia has been traditionally classified in tribe Millettieae, but our new molecular data and re-assessment of morphological traits have resolved the genus within the early-branching papilionoid tribe Brongniartieae. Characters including the pinnately multifoliolate (vs. unifoliolate) leaves, a sessile (vs. stipitate) ovary, and an indehiscent or late dehiscent one-seeded pod distinguish Behaimia from its closer relatives, the South American genera Cyclolobium and Limadendron.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2017.01.001DOI Listing
April 2017

A molecular-dated phylogeny and biogeography of the monotypic legume genus Haplormosia, a missing African branch of the otherwise American-Australian Brongniartieae clade.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2017 02 11;107:431-442. Epub 2016 Dec 11.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina, s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil.

A comprehensively sampled reassessment of the molecular phylogeny of the genistoid legumes questions the traditional placement of Haplormosia, an African monotypic genus traditionally classified within tribe Sophoreae close to the Asian-American geographically disjunct genus Ormosia. Plastid matK sequences placed Haplormosia as sister to the American-Australian tribe Brongniartieae. Despite a superficial resemblance between Haplormosia and Ormosia, a re-examination of the morphology of Haplormosia corroborates the new phylogenetic result. The reciprocally monophyletic deep divergence of the Haplormosia stem lineage from the remaining Brongniartieae is dated to ca. 52Mya, thus supporting a signature of an old single long-distance dispersal during the early Eocene. Conversely, we estimated a relatively recent long-distance dispersal rooted in the Early Miocene for the Australian Brongniartieae clade emerging from within a grade of American Brongniartieae. The Bayesian ancestral area reconstruction revealed the coming and going of neotropical ancestors during the diversification history of the Brongniartieae legumes in Africa and all over the Americas and Australia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.12.012DOI Listing
February 2017

Optimization of DNA extraction and PCR protocols for phylogenetic analysis in Schinopsis spp. and related Anacardiaceae.

Springerplus 2016 18;5:477. Epub 2016 Apr 18.

Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Campo Experimental Villarino, S2125ZAA Zavalla, Santa Fe Argentina ; IICAR, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET-UNR), Zavalla, Argentina.

The Anacardiaceae is an important and worldwide distributed family of ecological and socio-economic relevance. Notwithstanding that, molecular studies in this family are scarce and problematic because of the particularly high concentration of secondary metabolites-i.e. tannins and oleoresins-that are present in almost all tissues of the many members of the group, which complicate the purification and amplification of the DNA. The objective of this work was to improve an available DNA isolation method for Schinopsis spp. and other related Anacardiaceae, as well as the PCR protocols for DNA amplification of the chloroplast trnL-F, rps16 and ndhF and nuclear ITS-ETS fragments. The modifications proposed allowed the extraction of 70-120 µg of non-degraded genomic DNA per gram of dry tissue that resulted useful for PCR amplification. PCR reactions produced the expected fragments that could be directly sequenced. Sequence analyses of amplicons showed similarity with the corresponding Schinopsis accessions available at GenBank. The methodology presented here can be routinely applied for molecular studies of the group aimed to clarify not only aspects on the molecular biology but also the taxonomy and phylogeny of this fascinating group of vascular plants.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-2118-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4835408PMC
May 2016

A dated phylogeny of the papilionoid legume genus Canavalia reveals recent diversification by a pantropical liana lineage.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2016 May 6;98:133-46. Epub 2016 Feb 6.

Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Av. Transnordestina, s/n, Novo Horizonte, Feira de Santana 44036-900, Bahia, Brazil. Electronic address:

Canavalia is a pantropical legume genus of lianas comprising approximately 60 species distributed in a wide range of habitats. In the last taxonomic revision, the genus was divided into four subgenera: Canavalia (Pantropical), Catodonia (Neotropical, excepting one species also found in the Old World), Maunaloa (Hawaiian), and Wenderothia (Neotropical). In this study, we reconstructed the phylogeny of Canavalia using a broad taxon sampling and analyses of nuclear (ETS and ITS) and plastid markers (trnK/matK). We evaluated the infrageneric classification of the genus and investigated its biogeographical history using molecular dating analyses and ancestral area reconstructions. The phylogenetic analyses resolved subgenus Wenderothia as monophyletic. Subgenus Catodonia needs to be recircumscribed and the relationships between subgenera Canavalia and Maunaloa remain unclear. Canavalia arose during the Miocene with a mean stem age estimate of 13.8Ma and mean crown age estimate of 8.7Ma, and most extant species evolved during the Pleistocene. Several climatic and geological events are chronologically coincident with the divergence of the major clades of Canavalia (glacial/interglacial periods, Andes uplift and the formation of Pebas and post-Pebas systems, closure of the Isthmus of Panama, and change in the direction of ocean currents). Ancestral area reconstructions for the early divergence of the genus are equivocal, although, some evidence suggests Canavalia originated in the wet forests of South America and achieved its current pantropical distribution through recent transoceanic dispersal. The evolution of Canavalia is better explained by a series of several processes than by discrete historical events.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.02.001DOI Listing
May 2016

Microsatellite markers for Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Caesalpinioideae, Fabaceae).

Appl Plant Sci 2016 Jan 11;4(1). Epub 2016 Jan 11.

Departamento Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS), Av. Transnordestina s/n, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil.

Premise Of The Study: Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Fabaceae) is a South and Central American tree of great ecological importance and one of the most common species in several sites of seasonally dry forests. Our goal was to develop microsatellite markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure of this species.

Methods And Results: We designed and assessed 53 loci obtained from a microsatellite-enriched library and an intersimple sequence repeat library. Fourteen loci were polymorphic, and they presented a total of 39 alleles in a sample of 61 individuals from six populations. The mean values of observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.355 and 0.479, respectively. Polymorphism information content was 0.390 and the Shannon index was 0.778.

Conclusions: Polymorphism information content and Shannon index indicate that at least nine of the 14 microsatellite loci developed are moderate to highly informative, and potentially useful for population genetic studies in this species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/apps.1500062DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4716775PMC
January 2016

Molecular systematics of the Amazonian genus Aldina, a phylogenetically enigmatic ectomycorrhizal lineage of papilionoid legumes.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2016 Apr 31;97:11-18. Epub 2015 Dec 31.

Departamento de Botânica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Barão de Jeremoabo, s.n., Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina, s.n., Novo Horizonte, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil. Electronic address:

Aldina (Leguminosae) is among the very few ecologically successful ectomycorrhizal lineages in a family largely marked by the evolution of nodulating symbiosis. The genus comprises 20 species predominantly distributed in Amazonia and has been traditionally classified in the tribe Swartzieae because of its radial flowers with an entire calyx and numerous free stamens. The taxonomy of Aldina is complicated due to its poor representation in herbaria and the lack of a robust phylogenetic hypothesis of relationship. Recent phylogenetic analyses of matK and trnL sequences confirmed the placement of Aldina in the 50-kb inversion clade, although the genus remained phylogenetically isolated or unresolved in the context of the evolutionary history of the main early-branching papilionoid lineages. We performed maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of combined chloroplast datasets (matK, rbcL, and trnL) and explored the effect of incomplete taxa or missing data in order to shed light on the enigmatic phylogenetic position of Aldina. Unexpectedly, a sister relationship of Aldina with the Andira clade (Andira and Hymenolobium) is revealed. We suggest that a new tribal phylogenetic classification of the papilionoid legumes should place Aldina along with Andira and Hymenolobium. These results highlight yet another example of the independent evolution of radial floral symmetry within the early-branching Papilionoideae, a large collection of florally heterogeneous lineages dominated by papilionate or bilaterally symmetric flower morphology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2015.12.017DOI Listing
April 2016

A multilocus phylogenetic analysis reveals the monophyly of a recircumscribed papilionoid legume tribe Diocleae with well-supported generic relationships.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2015 Sep 28;90:1-19. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

Smithsonian Institution, 10th and Constitution Ave, Washington, DC 20013-7012, USA.

Deciphering the phylogenetic relationships within the species-rich Millettioid clade has persisted as one of the major challenges in the systematics and evolutionary history of papilionoid legumes (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae). Historically, the predominantly neotropical lianas of subtribe Diocleinae in the Millettioid legumes have been taxonomically tangled together with the largely heterogeneous tribe Phaseoleae. This work presents a comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis based on nuclear and chloroplast markers and includes all genera ever referred to Diocleae except for the monospecific Philippine Luzonia, resolving several key generic relationships within the Millettioid legumes. The first of two separate analyses includes 310 matK accessions and strongly supports the reestablishment of tribe Diocleae as a branch of the Millettioid clade. This work sheds greater light on the higher-level phylogeny of Diocleae and allows the recognition of three major lineages: the Canavalia, Dioclea, and Galactia clades. The second set of phylogenetic analyses utilized nuclear (ITS/5.8S and ETS) and plastid (matK and trnT-Y) DNA sequences to reveal (i) the monophyly of Canavalia and Cleobulia; (ii) the monophyly of Bionia with the exclusion of Bionia bella; (iii) the paraphyly of Dioclea with respect to Cleobulia, Cymbosema, and Macropsychanthus; (iv) the paraphyly of Cratylia with respect to the broadly polyphyletic Camptosema; and (v) the polyphyly of Galactia with species scattered widely across the tree.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2015.04.016DOI Listing
September 2015

Monomethyl ethers of 4,5-dihydroxypipecolic acid from Petaladenium urceoliferum: Enigmatic chemistry of an enigmatic legume.

Phytochemistry 2015 Aug 24;116:198-202. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AB, UK.

Leaves of Petaladenium (Leguminosae), an Amazonian monospecific genus recently revealed as a member of the Amburaneae clade among the earliest-diverging papilionoid legumes, were found to accumulate three monomethyl ethers of 4,5-dihydroxypipecolic acids. These were characterised by spectroscopic means as the (2S,4S,5R) and (2S,4R,5S) epimers of 5-hydroxy-4-methoxypipecolic acid and (2S,4R,5R)-4-hydroxy-5-methoxypipecolic acid. These compounds were not detected in any other genera in the Amburaneae clade or the wider Angylocalyceae-Dipterygeae-Amburaneae (ADA) clade of papilionoid legumes. Hydroxypipecolic acids, however, were detected in leaves of Myrocarpus and Myroxylon (sister genera in the Amburaneae clade), Angylocalyx and Xanthocercis (sister genera in the Angylocalyceae clade) and Monopteryx (Dipterygeae clade), and were also present in Petaladenium. Iminosugars, known to be accumulated by all four genera in the Angylocalyceae clade (Alexa, Angylocalyx, Castanospermum and Xanthocercis), were found to be characteristic of this group within the ADA clade.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2015.02.026DOI Listing
August 2015

Filling in the gaps of the papilionoid legume phylogeny: the enigmatic Amazonian genus Petaladenium is a new branch of the early-diverging Amburaneae clade.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2015 Mar 7;84:112-24. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica (PPGBot), Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina, s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil.

Recent deep-level phylogenies of the basal papilionoid legumes (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae) have resolved many clades, yet left the phylogenetic placement of several genera unassessed. The phylogenetically enigmatic Amazonian monospecific genus Petaladenium had been believed to be close to the genera of the Genistoid Ormosieae clade. In this paper we provide the first DNA phylogenetic study of Petaladenium and show it is not part of the large Genistoid clade, but is a new branch of the Amburaneae clade, one of the first-diverging lineages of the Papilionoideae phylogeny. This result is supported by the chemical observation that the quinolizidine alkaloids, a chemical synapomorphy of the Genistoids, are absent in Petaladenium. Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of nuclear ITS/5.8S and plastid matK and trnL intron agree with a new interpretation of morphology that Petaladenium is sister to Dussia, a genus comprising ∼18 species of trees largely confined to rainforests in Central America and northern South America. Petaladenium, Dussia, and Myrospermum have papilionate flowers in a clade otherwise with radial floral symmetry, loss of petals or incompletely differentiated petals. Our phylogenetic analyses also revealed well-supported resolution within the three main lineages of the ADA clade (Angylocalyceae, Dipterygeae, and Amburaneae). We also discuss further molecular phylogenetic evidence for the undersampled Amazonian genera Aldina and Monopteryx, and the tropical African Amphimas, Cordyla, Leucomphalos, and Mildbraediodendron.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.12.015DOI Listing
March 2015

Development of microsatellite markers in Cratylia mollis and their transferability to C. argentea (Fabaceae).

Appl Plant Sci 2013 Oct 4;1(10). Epub 2013 Oct 4.

Departamento Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS), Av. Transnordestina s.n., 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil.

Unlabelled:

Premise Of The Study: This work aimed to develop microsatellite markers for Cratylia mollis as tools to assess its genetic diversity and structure and to evaluate their potential cross-amplification in related species. •

Methods And Results: Microsatellite markers were developed using a microsatellite-enriched library and an intersimple sequence repeat library. From a set of 19 markers, 12 microsatellite loci were polymorphic and presented considerable variation in allele number (2-11), expected heterozygosity (0.226-0.883), and polymorphism information content per locus (0.212-0.870). Cross-amplification in C. argentea was successful in 16 loci, 12 of which were polymorphic (2-10 alleles). •

Conclusions: The polymorphism of this set of microsatellite markers for C. mollis, as well as their successful cross-amplification in C. intermedia and C. bahiensis and their transferability to C. argentea, supports their use in future comparative studies to understand the mechanism involved in population divergence and speciation in the genus.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/apps.1300015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4103464PMC
October 2013

Morphological analyses suggest a new taxonomic circumscription for Hymenaea courbaril L. (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae).

PhytoKeys 2014 18(38):101-18. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Programa de Pós-graduação em Botânica,Herbário, Km 03-BR 116, Campus. 44031-460, Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brasil.

Hymenaea is a genus of the Resin-producing Clade of the tribe Detarieae (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) with 14 species. Hymenaea courbaril is the most widespread species of the genus, ranging from southern Mexico to southeastern Brazil. As currently circumscribed, Hymenaea courbaril is a polytypic species with six varieties: var. altissima, var. courbaril, var. longifolia, var. stilbocarpa, var. subsessilis, and var. villosa. These varieties are distinguishable mostly by traits related to leaflet shape and indumentation, and calyx indumentation. We carried out morphometric analyses of 14 quantitative (continuous) leaf characters in order to assess the taxonomy of Hymenaea courbaril under the Unified Species Concept framework. Cluster analysis used the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) based on Bray-Curtis dissimilarity matrices. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) were carried out based on the same morphometric matrix. Two sets of Analyses of Similarity and Non Parametric Multivariate Analysis of Variance were carried out to evaluate statistical support (1) for the major groups recovered using UPGMA and PCA, and (2) for the varieties. All analyses recovered three major groups coincident with (1) var. altissima, (2) var. longifolia, and (3) all other varieties. These results, together with geographical and habitat information, were taken as evidence of three separate metapopulation lineages recognized here as three distinct species. Nomenclatural adjustments, including reclassifying formerly misapplied types, are proposed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.38.7408DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4086212PMC
July 2014

A molecular phylogeny of the vataireoid legumes underscores floral evolvability that is general to many early-branching papilionoid lineages.

Am J Bot 2013 Feb 1;100(2):403-21. Epub 2013 Feb 1.

Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Av. Transnordestina, s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44036-900, Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil.

Premise Of Study: Flowering traits can sometimes be overemphasized in taxonomic classifications. The fused and completely differentiated papilionate floral organs in the neotropical legume trees Vatairea and Vataireopsis were traditionally used in part to ascribe these genera to the tribe Dalbergieae. In contrast, the free and mostly undifferentiated floral parts of Luetzelburgia and Sweetia fit the circumscription of the "primitive" Sophoreae. Such divergent floral morphologies thought to divide deep phylogenetic lineages indeed may be prone to episodic transformation among close papilionoid relatives.

Methods: We sampled 26 of 27 known species of Luetzelburgia, Sweetia, Vatairea, and Vataireopsis in parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal ITS/5.8S and six plastid (matK, 3'-trnK, psbA-trnH, trnL intron, rps16 intron, and trnD-T) DNA sequence loci.

Key Results: The analyses of individual and combined data sets strongly resolved the monophyly of each of Luetzelburgia, Sweetia, Vatairea, and Vataireopsis. Vataireopsis was resolved as sister to the rest and the morphologically divergent Luetzelburgia and Vatairea were strongly resolved as sister clades. Floral morphology was generally not a good predictor of phylogenetic relatedness.

Conclusions: Luetzelburgia, Sweetia, Vatairea, and Vataireopsis are unequivocally resolved as the "vataireoid" clade. Fruit and vegetative traits are found to be more phylogenetically conserved than many floral traits. This explains why the identity of the vataireoids has been overlooked or confused. The evolvability of floral traits may also be a general condition among many of the early-branching papilionoid lineages.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/ajb.1200276DOI Listing
February 2013

Anti-leishmanial and immunomodulatory activities of extracts from Portulaca hirsutissima and Portulaca werdermannii.

Fitoterapia 2007 Dec 4;78(7-8):510-4. Epub 2007 Jul 4.

Laboratório de Engenharia Tecidual e Imunofarmacologia, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.

Ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts from aerial parts of Portulaca werdermannii and P. hirsutissima were tested in lymphoproliferation assays and axenic cultures of Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi. Both extracts of P. werdermannii and P. hirsutissima had a potent inhibitory activity on lymphocyte proliferation. On the contrary, only the chloroformic extract of both plants inhibited L. amazonensis growth, without effect on T. cruzi cultures. These results indicate these Portulaca species as potential sources of new active molecules for the treatment of leishmaniasis and immune-mediated pathologies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2007.05.005DOI Listing
December 2007

Post-zygotic reproductive isolation between sympatric taxa in the Chamaecrista desvauxii complex (Leguminosae-Caesalpinioideae).

Ann Bot 2007 Apr 1;99(4):625-35. Epub 2007 Mar 1.

Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Laboratório de Sistemática Molecular de Plantas, Rodovia BR116 Km 03, Feira de Santana, BA, 44031-460, Brazil.

Background And Aims: Differences in the mating systems and the mechanisms of reproductive isolation between Chamaecrista desvauxii var. graminea and C. desvauxii var. latistipula were examined in the Chapada Diamantina, Brazil. These taxa occur sympatrically, and their populations demonstrate marked morphological differences. The objective of the present work was to determine if reproductive isolation mechanisms exist between these two populations of C. desvauxii, and to determine the influence of these putative mechanisms on their genetic differentiation.

Methods: Field observations were made of floral biology, phenology and floral visitation, and experiments on intra- and interpopulation pollination and germination rates of the resultant seeds were performed. A genetic examination of the populations was undertaken using four allozyme loci.

Key Results: The varieties examined demonstrated overlapping of flowering periods during the months of June to September. The main pollinator for both varieties was the bee Bombus brevivillus. Both varieties are self-compatible, and a large number of fruits are formed in cross-pollinations with high seed germination rates. Inter-taxa pollinations result in high levels of fruit production, but no seeds are formed. Two of the four loci examined were diagnostic for the varieties, and exclusive high-frequency alleles were encountered at the other loci, leading to a high genetic distance between the two populations (0.495).

Conclusions: Pre-zygotic barriers were not found between the two varieties, and these remain isolated due to post-zygotic events. The two varieties demonstrate marked differences in their morphology, floral biology, phenology and genetic make-up, all of which indicate that they should be treated as two distinct species. A complete revision involving the other varieties of the C. desvauxii complex will be necessary in order to define these two taxa formally.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcm012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2802947PMC
April 2007

Phylogenetic relationships within Senna (Leguminosae, Cassiinae) based on three chloroplast DNA regions: patterns in the evolution of floral symmetry and extrafloral nectaries.

Am J Bot 2006 Feb;93(2):288-303

Institute of Systematic Botany, University of Zurich, Zollikerstrasse 107, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland;

Senna (Leguminosae) is a large, widespread genus that includes species with enantiostylous, asymmetric flowers and species with extrafloral nectaries. Clarification of phylogenetic relationships within Senna based on parsimony analyses of three chloroplast regions (rpS16, rpL16, and matK) provides new insights on the evolution of floral symmetry and extrafloral nectaries. Our results support the monophyly of only one (Psilorhegma) of the six currently recognized sections, while Chamaefistula, Peiranisia, and Senna are paraphyletic, and monotypic Astroites and Paradictyon are nested within two of the seven major clades identified by our molecular phylogeny. Two clades (I, VII) include only species with monosymmetric flowers, while the remaining clades (II-VI) contain species with asymmetric, enantiostylous flowers, in which either the gynoecium alone or, in addition, corolla and androecium variously contribute to the asymmetry. Our results further suggest that flowers were ancestrally monosymmetric with seven fertile stamens and three adaxial staminodes, switched to asymmetry later, and reverted to monosymmetry in clade VII. Fertility of all 10 stamens is a derived state, characterizing the Psilorhegma subclade. Extrafloral nectaries evolved once and constitute a synapomorphy for clades IV-VII ("EFN clade"). These nectaries may represent a key innovation in plant defense strategies that enabled Senna to undergo large-scale diversification.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/ajb.93.2.288DOI Listing
February 2006
-->