Publications by authors named "Luciana Martel"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Patient-Centered Outcomes with Pituitary and Parasellar Disease.

Neuroendocrinology 2020 27;110(9-10):882-888. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Department of Medicine/Endocrinology, IIB-Sant Pau, Hospital Sant Pau, Research Center for Pituitary Diseases, Barcelona, Spain.

Over the last 2 decades, advances in the diagnosis and management of pituitary diseases have made it possible to attain an endocrine "cure" in a large proportion of patients. In other words, tumors can be excised or controlled with drugs, mass effects of the lesion on surrounding structures can be solved, and pituitary deficiencies can be substituted with all relevant hormones. While this is considered a satisfactory outcome for health care providers, patients often suffer from an aftermath of prior endocrine dysfunction exposure, with irreversible effects, both physically and psychologically, which have a great impact on their everyday life. Diagnostic delay, often of several years, adds a negative impact on health perception. This affects their social, professional, and family domains and determines their future life. Understanding that this may occur is important, and health care providers should offer information to prepare the patient for this difficult journey, especially in the case of acromegaly, Cushing disease, or hypopituitarism. In order to maintain a good quality of life (QoL) in the long-term, patients need to adapt to this new situation, something that may be difficult, since they often cannot continue with all the activities and rhythm they used to do. Depression is often the consequence of maladaptation to the new situation, leading to impaired QoL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000506809DOI Listing
February 2020

Quality of Life in Patients With Cushing's Disease.

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2019 11;10:862. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Endocrinology/Medicine Departments, Hospital Sant Pau, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER, Unidad 747), IIB-Sant Pau, ISCIII and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Cushing's disease (and by extension, Cushing's syndrome) is a rare disease due to a chronic cortisol excess, which usually has an important impact on quality of life (QoL). It can lead to numerous comorbidities that can interfere with daily life, as fatigability, myopathy, bone loss and fragility, increased cardiovascular risk, depression, and cognitive alterations. Of note, psychological alterations (including depression and anxiety) occur often, and are an important determinant of impaired quality QoL. QoL scores using different questionnaires are poorer in comparison to healthy controls, other pituitary adenomas and some chronic diseases. Even if some improvements can be observed after successful treatment, recovery does not seem to be complete, and comorbidities persist. This persistent QoL impairment has been found using both generic and disease-specific QoL questionnaires, and is also reported by the patients themselves, when asked directly. Multidisciplinary teams are essential to improve patients' well-being. Clinicians should take into account the whole scope of clinical problems and address the different comorbidites associated with the disease. Screening in the psychological sphere, with further intervention if necessary, can be helpful in the management of these patients. Interventions and programs have shown promising results, although there is a need for further development of new strategies for the benefit of these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2019.00862DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6917662PMC
December 2019

Quality of Life in Cushing's disease: A long term issue?

Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2018 Jun 4;79(3):132-137. Epub 2018 Apr 4.

Endocrinology/Medicine Department, Research Center for Pituitary Diseases, Hospital Sant Pau, IIB-Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Pare Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER, Unidad 747), ISCIII, Spain. Electronic address:

The purpose of this review is to describe how quality of life (QoL) is impaired in patients with hypercortisolism due to Cushing's syndrome of any aetiology, including pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease. It is worse in active disease, but improvement after successful therapy is often incomplete, due to persistent physical and psychological co-morbidities, even years after endocrine "cure". Physical symptoms like extreme fatigability, central obesity with limb atrophy, hypertension, fractures, and different skin abnormalities severely impair the affected patients' everyday life. Psychological and cognitive problems like bad memory, difficulties to concentrate and emotional distress, often associated with anxiety and depression, make it difficult for many patients to overcome the aftermath of treated Cushing's syndrome. Recent studies have shown diffuse structural abnormalities in the central nervous system during active hypercortisolism, thought to be related to the wide distribution of glucocorticoid receptors throughout the brain. Even though they improve after treatment, normalization is often not complete. Shortening the exposure to active Cushing's syndrome by reducing the often long delay to diagnosis and promptly receiving effective treatment is highly desirable, together with preparing the patient for the difficult periods, especially after surgery. In this way they are prepared for the impairments they perceive in every day life, and live with the hope of later improvement, which can be therapeutic in many instances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ando.2018.03.007DOI Listing
June 2018