Publications by authors named "Luciana F R Nogueira"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exogenous melatonin decreases circadian misalignment and body weight among early types.

J Pineal Res 2021 Jun 6:e12750. Epub 2021 Jun 6.

Department of Health, Life Cycles and Society, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Shift workers experience chronic circadian misalignment, which can manifest itself in reduced melatonin production, and has been associated with metabolic disorders. In addition, chronotype modulates the effect of night shift work, with early types presenting greater circadian misalignment when working night shift as compared to late types. Melatonin supplementation has shown positive results reducing weight gain in animal models, but the effect of exogenous melatonin in humans on body weight in the context of shift work remains inconsistent. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on circadian misalignment and body weight among overweight night shift workers, according to chronotype, under real life conditions. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial where melatonin (3 mg) or placebo was administered on non-night shift nights for 12 weeks in 27 female nurses (37.1 yo, ±5.9 yo; BMI 29.9 kg/m , ±3.3 kg/m ). Melatonin (or placebo) was only taken on nights when the participants did not work night shifts, that is, on nights when they slept (between night shifts and on days-off). Composite Phase Deviations (CPD) of actigraphy-based midsleep timing were calculated to measure circadian misalignment. The analyses were performed for the whole group and by chronotype. We found approximately 20% reduction of circadian misalignment after exogenous melatonin administration considering all chronotypes. Moreover, melatonin supplementation in those who presented high circadian misalignment, as observed in early chronotypes, reduced body weight, BMI, waist circumference, and hip circumference, without any change in the participants' calorie intake or physical activity levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpi.12750DOI Listing
June 2021

Effects of melatonin supplementation on eating habits and appetite-regulating hormones: a systematic review of randomized controlled clinical and preclinical trials.

Chronobiol Int 2021 May 2:1-14. Epub 2021 May 2.

Department of Epidemiology, Public Health Graduate Program, Catholic University of Santos, SP, Brazil.

Melatonin is a hormone involved in appetite regulation and food intake. Circadian chronorrupture caused by its absence has been associated with excessive food consumption, and there is evidence that exogenous melatonin supplementation can restore homeostasis. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to synthesize evidence from randomized controlled clinical and preclinical trials that evaluated the effects of exogenous melatonin supplementation on eating habits and appetite-regulating hormones. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO (number 42020175809). Medline, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Library were systematically searched from January 2020 to February 2021. Of 3.695 articles identified, 2 clinical and 13 preclinical trials (n = 15) met the inclusion criteria. The outcomes were total food intake, calories, macronutrients, cholesterol intake, leptin and ghrelin levels. Interventions ranged from 28 to 336 days and dose of melatonin varied between 0.2 µg/mL of drinking water and 10 mg/day. Clinical trials were conducted with healthy adults, and preclinical trials with rodents and dogs. Of the 15 articles, five assessed food intake and leptin, four assessed food intake only, five assessed leptin only, and one assessed leptin and ghrelin serum levels. The majority of the articles were judged as having low risk of bias. Although findings are heterogeneous and do not allow a robust conclusion, this review adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that exogenous melatonin may be a potential therapeutic agent against endocrine-metabolic disorders. This reversal is not necessarily associated with changes in food consumption, signaling that melatonin's metabolic effects may occur independently of energy intake. Further studies, especially with humans, are needed provide more evidences for melatonin supplementation in clinical practice, as well as to understand its role on eating habits and appetite-regulating hormones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07420528.2021.1918143DOI Listing
May 2021