Publications by authors named "Lucas Sjulson"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cocaine Place Conditioning Strengthens Location-Specific Hippocampal Coupling to the Nucleus Accumbens.

Neuron 2018 06 10;98(5):926-934.e5. Epub 2018 May 10.

NYU Neuroscience Institute, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address:

Conditioned place preference (CPP) is a widely used model of addiction-related behavior whose underlying mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we used dual site silicon probe recordings in freely moving mice to examine interactions between the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in cocaine CPP. We found that CPP was associated with recruitment of D2-positive nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons to fire in the cocaine-paired location, and this recruitment was driven predominantly by selective strengthening of coupling with hippocampal place cells that encode the cocaine-paired location. These findings provide in vivo evidence suggesting that the synaptic potentiation in the accumbens caused by repeated cocaine administration preferentially affects inputs that were active at the time of drug exposure. This provides a potential physiological mechanism by which drug use becomes associated with specific environmental contexts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2018.04.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154491PMC
June 2018

Cell-Specific Targeting of Genetically Encoded Tools for Neuroscience.

Annu Rev Genet 2016 Nov 6;50:571-594. Epub 2016 Oct 6.

Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3SR, United Kingdom; email:

Genetically encoded tools for visualizing and manipulating neurons in vivo have led to significant advances in neuroscience, in large part because of the ability to target expression to specific cell populations of interest. Current methods enable targeting based on marker gene expression, development, anatomical projection pattern, synaptic connectivity, and recent activity as well as combinations of these factors. Here, we review these methods, focusing on issues of practical implementation as well as areas for future improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-genet-120215-035011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5630135PMC
November 2016

In vivo optogenetic identification and manipulation of GABAergic interneuron subtypes.

Curr Opin Neurobiol 2014 Jun 14;26:88-95. Epub 2014 Jan 14.

NYU Neuroscience Institute, School of Medicine and Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY 10016, United States. Electronic address:

Identification and manipulation of different GABAergic interneuron classes in the behaving animal are important to understand their role in circuit dynamics and behavior. The combination of optogenetics and large-scale neuronal recordings allows specific interneuron populations to be identified and perturbed for circuit analysis in intact animals. A crucial aspect of this approach is coupling electrophysiological recording with spatially and temporally precise light delivery. Focal multisite illumination of neuronal activators and silencers in predetermined temporal configurations or a closed loop manner opens the door to addressing many novel questions. Recent progress demonstrates the utility and power of this novel technique for interneuron research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2013.12.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4024355PMC
June 2014

Reverse pharmacogenetic modulation of the nucleus accumbens reduces ethanol consumption in a limited access paradigm.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2014 Jan 1;39(2):283-90. Epub 2013 Aug 1.

1] Department of Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA [2] Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Smilow Neuroscience Program, NYU Neuroscience Institute, New York, NY, USA.

Bilateral stereotactic lesioning of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core reduces relapse rates in alcohol-dependent patients but may cause irreversible cognitive deficits. Deep brain stimulation has similar effects but requires costly implanted hardware and regular surgical maintenance. Therefore, there is considerable interest in refining these approaches to develop reversible, minimally invasive treatments for alcohol dependence. Toward this end, we evaluated the feasibility of a reverse pharmacogenetic approach in a preclinical mouse model. We first assessed the predictive validity of a limited access ethanol consumption paradigm by confirming that electrolytic lesions of the NAc core decreased ethanol consumption, recapitulating the effects of similar lesions in humans. We then used this paradigm to test the effect of modulating activity in the NAc using the Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) hM3Dq and hM4Di. We found that increasing activity with hM3Dq had no effect, but suppressing activity with hM4Di reduced alcohol consumption to a similar extent as lesioning without affecting consumption of water or sucrose. These results may represent early steps toward a novel neurosurgical treatment modality for alcohol dependence that is reversible and externally titratable, yet highly targetable and less invasive than current approaches such as lesioning or deep brain stimulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2013.184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3870771PMC
January 2014

Psychiatric consequences of actual versus feared and perceived bed bug infestations: a case series examining a current epidemic.

Psychosomatics 2012 Jan-Feb;53(1):85-91

Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2011.08.001DOI Listing
April 2012

Writing memories with light-addressable reinforcement circuitry.

Cell 2009 Oct;139(2):405-15

Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT, UK.

Dopaminergic neurons are thought to drive learning by signaling changes in the expectations of salient events, such as rewards or punishments. Olfactory conditioning in Drosophila requires direct dopamine action on intrinsic mushroom body neurons, the likely storage sites of olfactory memories. Neither the cellular sources of the conditioning dopamine nor its precise postsynaptic targets are known. By optically controlling genetically circumscribed subsets of dopaminergic neurons in the behaving fly, we have mapped the origin of aversive reinforcement signals to the PPL1 cluster of 12 dopaminergic cells. PPL1 projections target restricted domains in the vertical lobes and heel of the mushroom body. Artificially evoked activity in a small number of identifiable cells thus suffices for programming behaviorally meaningful memories. The delineation of core reinforcement circuitry is an essential first step in dissecting the neural mechanisms that compute and represent valuations, store associations, and guide actions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3920284PMC
October 2009

Rational optimization and imaging in vivo of a genetically encoded optical voltage reporter.

J Neurosci 2008 May;28(21):5582-93

Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

The hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) combines membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein and the hydrophobic anion dipicrylamine (DPA) to provide a promising tool for optical recording of electrical activity from genetically defined populations of neurons. However, large fluorescence signals are obtained only at high DPA concentrations (>3 mum) that increase membrane capacitance to a level that suppresses neural activity. Here, we develop a quantitative model of the sensor to guide its optimization and achieved an approximate threefold increase in fractional fluorescence change at a lower DPA concentration of 2 mum. Using this optimized voltage reporter, we perform optical recordings of evoked activity in the Drosophila antennal lobe with millisecond temporal resolution but fail to detect action potentials, presumably because spike initiation and/or propagation are inhibited by the capacitive load added even at reduced DPA membrane densities. We evaluate strategies for potential further improvement of hVOS quantitatively and derive theoretical performance limits for optical voltage reporters in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0055-08.2008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2714581PMC
May 2008

Photocontrol of neural activity: biophysical mechanisms and performance in vivo.

Chem Rev 2008 May 1;108(5):1588-602. Epub 2008 May 1.

Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr078221bDOI Listing
May 2008

Optical recording of action potentials and other discrete physiological events: a perspective from signal detection theory.

Physiology (Bethesda) 2007 Feb;22:47-55

Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Optical imaging of physiological events in real time can yield insights into biological function that would be difficult to obtain by other experimental means. However, the detection of all-or-none events, such as action potentials or vesicle fusion events, in noisy single-trial data often requires a careful balance of tradeoffs. The analysis of such experiments, as well as the design of optical reporters and instrumentation for them, is aided by an understanding of the principles of signal detection. This review illustrates these principles, using as an example action potential recording with optical voltage reporters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00036.2006DOI Listing
February 2007

Excitatory local circuits and their implications for olfactory processing in the fly antennal lobe.

Cell 2007 Feb;128(3):601-12

Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Conflicting views exist of how circuits of the antennal lobe, the insect equivalent of the olfactory bulb, translate input from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) into projection-neuron (PN) output. Synaptic connections between ORNs and PNs are one-to-one, yet PNs are more broadly tuned to odors than ORNs. The basis for this difference in receptive range remains unknown. Analyzing a Drosophila mutant lacking ORN input to one glomerulus, we show that some of the apparent complexity in the antennal lobe's output arises from lateral, interglomerular excitation of PNs. We describe a previously unidentified population of cholinergic local neurons (LNs) with multiglomerular processes. These excitatory LNs respond broadly to odors but exhibit little glomerular specificity in their synaptic output, suggesting that PNs are driven by a combination of glomerulus-specific ORN afferents and diffuse LN excitation. Lateral excitation may boost PN signals and enhance their transmission to third-order neurons in a mechanism akin to stochastic resonance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2006.12.034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2866183PMC
February 2007