Publications by authors named "Lucas Coroyer"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Interventricular septum mass presenting as a late acute coronary syndrome with ST-segment elevation: a case report.

Eur Heart J Case Rep 2021 May 12;5(5):ytab164. Epub 2021 May 12.

Radiology Department, Hopital Saint-Joseph, 185 Rue Raymond Losserand, 75014 Paris, France.

Background: Intracardiac masses are relatively rare but the diagnosis can be challenging for the cardiologist and the clinical presentation can be misleading. While most of the cardiac masses are benign, malignant masses are mostly metastatic tumours.

Case Summary: An 81-year-old man was admitted to the cardiology department for congestive heart failure with the complaint of recent dyspnoea. The initial electrocardiogram was suggestive of a late presentation of an anterior myocardial infarction. Blood test showed mild and stable elevation of troponin and brain natriuretic peptide. Doppler-echocardiography revealed an interventricular septal thickening. Contrast echocardiography revealed a mass with a possibly necrotic centre and peripheral hypervascularization. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) confirmed the existence of a cardiac tumour with a hypodense centre and also revealed the presence of a large tumour of the lung's left lower lobe with multiple enlarged lymph nodes associated with possible left adrenal gland metastasis. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of the pulmonary mass demonstrated a squamous cell lung cancer which was likely the primary cancer. The patient was discharged home waiting for chemotherapy to start but died a few days later at home of an unknown cause.

Discussion: Diagnosis of intracardiac mass is difficult, often requiring multiple imaging modalities. Contrast-enhanced echocardiography may help early diagnosis and can be easily implemented with other imaging modalities such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging or CT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehjcr/ytab164DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8189305PMC
May 2021

Virtual reality vs. Kalinox® for management of pain in intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a randomized study.

Ann Intensive Care 2021 May 13;11(1):74. Epub 2021 May 13.

Department of Cardiology and Critical Care, CERIC, Clinique Ambroise Paré, 27 boulevard Victor Hugo, 92200, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France.

Introduction: The management of pain and anxiety remains a challenge in the intensive care unit. By distracting patients, virtual reality (VR) may have a role in painful procedures. We compared VR vs. an inhaled equimolar mixture of NO and O (Kalinox®) for pain and anxiety management during the removal of chest drains after cardiac surgery.

Methods: Prospective, non-inferiority, open-label study. Patients were randomized, for Kalinox® or VR session during drain removal. The analgesia/nociception index (ANI) was monitored during the procedure for objective assessment of pain and anxiety. The primary endpoint was the ΔANI (ANI - ANI) during the procedure, based on ANIm (average on 4 min). We prespecified VR as non-inferior to Kalinox® with a margin of 3 points. Self-reported pain and anxiety were also analysed using numeric rate scale (NRS).

Results: 200 patients were included, 99 in the VR group and 101 in the Kalinox® group; 90 patients were analysed in both groups in per-protocol analysis. The median age was 68.0 years [60.0-74.8]. The ΔANI was - 15.1 ± 12.9 in the Kalinox® group and - 15.7 ± 11.6 in the VR group (NS). The mean difference was, therefore, - 0.6 [- 3.6 to 2.4], including the non-inferiority margin of 3. Patients in the VR group had a significantly higher pain NRS scale immediately after the drain removal, 5.0 [3.0-7.0] vs. 3.0 [2.0-6.0], p = 0.009, but no difference 10 min after. NRS of anxiety did not differ between the two groups.

Conclusion: Based on the ANI, the current study showed that VR did not reach the statistical requirements for a proven non-inferiority vs. Kalinox® in managing pain and anxiety during chest drain removal. Moreover, VR was less effective based on NRS. More studies are needed to determine if VR might have a place in the overall approach to pain and anxiety in intensive care units. Trial registration NCT, NCT03956264. Registered 20 May 2019, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03956264.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13613-021-00866-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8119554PMC
May 2021
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