Publications by authors named "Louise Tangermann"

4 Publications

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Mutual effects of fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and fireworks on cause-specific acute cardiovascular mortality: A case-crossover study in communities affected by aircraft noise.

Environ Pollut 2021 Aug 30;291:118066. Epub 2021 Aug 30.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (SwissTPH), Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Ambient air pollution is the leading cause of environmental mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, the individual contributions to acute mortality of traffic-related air pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO) and fine particulate matter (PM) are still debated. We conducted a time-stratified case-crossover study for a population located around Zurich airport in Switzerland, including 24,886 adult cardiovascular deaths from the Swiss National Cohort. We estimated the risk of cause-specific cardiovascular mortality associated with daily NO and PM concentrations at home using distributed lag models up to 7 days preceding death, adjusted for daily temperature, precipitation, acute night-time aircraft noise, firework celebrations, and holidays. Cardiovascular mortality was associated with NO, whereas the association with PM disappeared upon adjustment for NO. The strongest association was observed between NO and ischemic stroke mortality (odds ratio = 1.55 per 10 μg/m, 95% confidence intervals = 1.20-2.00). Cause-specific mortality analyses showed differences in terms of delayed effect: odds ratios were highest at 1-3 days after exposure for most outcomes but at lags of 3-5 days for heart failure. Individual vulnerabilities to NO associated cardiovascular mortality also varied by cause of death, possibly highlighting the role of different behaviours and risk factors in the most susceptible groups. The risk of cardiovascular mortality was also increased on firework days and after public holidays, independent from NO and PM concentrations. This study confirms the association between ambient NO, as a marker for primary emissions, and acute cardiovascular mortality in a specific setting around a major airport. Future research should clarify the role of additional air pollutants including ultra-fine particles on cardiovascular diseases to inform most efficient control measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2021.118066DOI Listing
August 2021

The role of extreme temperature in cause-specific acute cardiovascular mortality in Switzerland: A case-crossover study.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Oct 23;790:147958. Epub 2021 May 23.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (SwissTPH), Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Since the 2003 heatwave in Europe, evidence has been rapidly increasing on the association between extreme temperature and all-cause mortality. Little is known, however, about cause-specific cardiovascular mortality, effect modification by air pollution and aircraft noise, and which population groups are the most vulnerable to extreme temperature. We conducted a time-stratified case-crossover study in Zurich, Switzerland, including all adult cardiovascular deaths between 2000 and 2015 with precise individual exposure estimates at home location. We estimated the risk of 24,884 cardiovascular deaths associated with heat and cold using distributed non-linear lag models. We investigated potential effect modification of temperature-related mortality by fine particles, nitrogen dioxide, and night-time aircraft noise and performed stratified analyses across individual and social characteristics. We found increased risk of mortality for heat (odds ratio OR = 1.28 [95% confidence interval: 1.11-1.49] for 99th percentile of daily Tmean (24 °C) versus optimum temperature at 20 °C) and cold (OR = 1.15 [0.95-1.39], 5th percentile of daily Tmean (-3 °C) versus optimum temperature at 20 °C). Heat-related mortality was particularly strong for myocardial infarctions and hypertension related deaths, and among older women (>75 years). Analysis of effect modification also indicated that older women with lower socio-economic position and education are at higher risk for heat-related mortality. PM increased the risk of heat-related mortality for heart failure, but not all-cause cardiovascular mortality. This study provides useful information for preventing cause-specific cardiovascular temperature-related mortality in moderate climate zones comparable to Switzerland.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.147958DOI Listing
October 2021

Does night-time aircraft noise trigger mortality? A case-crossover study on 24 886 cardiovascular deaths.

Eur Heart J 2021 02;42(8):835-843

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Socinstrasse 57, Basel 4002, Switzerland.

Aims: It is unclear whether night-time noise events, including from aeroplanes, could trigger a cardiovascular death. In this study, we investigate the potential acute effects of aircraft noise on mortality and the specific role of different night-time exposure windows by means of a case-crossover study design.

Methods And Results: We selected 24 886 cases of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) from the Swiss National Cohort around Zürich Airport between 2000 and 2015. For night-time deaths, exposure levels 2 h preceding death were significantly associated with mortality for all causes of CVD [OR = 1.44 (1.03-2.04) for the highest exposure group (LAeq > 50 dB vs. <20 dB)]. Most consistent associations were observed for ischaemic heart diseases, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and arrhythmia. Association were more pronounced for females (P = 0.02) and for people living in areas with low road and railway background noise (P = 0.01) and in buildings constructed before 1970 (P = 0.36). We calculated a population attributable fraction of 3% in our study population.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that night-time aircraft noise can trigger acute cardiovascular mortality. The association was similar to that previously observed for long-term aircraft noise exposure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa957DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7897463PMC
February 2021

Individual Aircraft Noise Exposure Assessment for a Case-Crossover Study in Switzerland.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 04 26;17(9). Epub 2020 Apr 26.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland.

Accurate exposure assessment is essential in environmental epidemiological studies. This is especially true for aircraft noise, which is characterized by a high spatial and temporal variation. We propose a method to assess individual aircraft noise exposure for a case-crossover study investigating the acute effects of aircraft noise on cardiovascular deaths. We identified all cases of cardiovascular death (24,886) occurring near Zürich airport, Switzerland, over fifteen years from the Swiss National Cohort. Outdoor noise exposure at the home address was calculated for the night preceding death and control nights using flight operations information from Zürich airport and noise footprints calculated for major aircraft types and air routes. We estimated three different noise metrics: mean sound pressure level (L), maximum sound pressure level (L), and number above threshold 55 dB (NAT) for different nighttime windows. Average nighttime aircraft noise levels were 45.2 dB, 64.6 dB, and 18.5 for L, L, and NAT respectively. In this paper, we present a method to estimate individual aircraft noise exposure with high spatio-temporal resolution and a flexible choice of exposure events and metrics. This exposure assessment will be used in a case-crossover study investigating the acute effects of noise on health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246478PMC
April 2020
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